LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Hardware
User Name
Password
Linux - Hardware This forum is for Hardware issues.
Having trouble installing a piece of hardware? Want to know if that peripheral is compatible with Linux?

Notices

View Poll Results: Proc. cores vs. Clock speed. Which would you favor?
8 cores (2 x intel clovertown e5310 1.60Ghz quad-core Xeon) 10 40.00%
4 cores (2 x intel woodcrest 5130 2.0Ghz dual-core Xeon) 5 20.00%
4 cores (1 x intel kentsfield X3220 2.4Ghz quad-core Xeon) 7 28.00%
2 cores (1 x intel woodcrest 5160 3.0Ghz dual-core Xeon) 3 12.00%
Voters: 25. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 09-12-2007, 01:59 AM   #1
jhwilliams
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Location: Portland, OR
Distribution: Debian, Android, LFS
Posts: 1,168

Rep: Reputation: 206Reputation: 206Reputation: 206
cores vs. clockspeed


Given the smp support in linux, would you tend to more processor cores, or more clockspeed per cpu? Specifcally, how do specific applications you use take advantage of threading?
 
Old 09-12-2007, 05:38 AM   #2
oskar
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2006
Location: Austria
Distribution: Ubuntu 12.10
Posts: 1,138

Rep: Reputation: 49
I would take the 8 cores just so I could brag about it.
 
Old 09-12-2007, 05:42 AM   #3
LauMars
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2007
Location: /root/
Distribution: Arch, CentOS, Debian, FreeBSD, Slackware, Solaris, SuSE (Open & SLES)
Posts: 115

Rep: Reputation: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by oskar View Post
I would take the 8 cores just so I could brag about it.
hehe same here
 
Old 09-12-2007, 06:58 AM   #4
jhwilliams
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Location: Portland, OR
Distribution: Debian, Android, LFS
Posts: 1,168

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 206Reputation: 206Reputation: 206
Wink

That's what I'm leaning towards. Imagine doing an /cat/cpuinfo and watching it scroll.
 
Old 09-30-2007, 07:18 PM   #5
Furrage
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2007
Posts: 11

Rep: Reputation: 0
8 Cores sounds cooler. I look forward to app that can take advantage of this.
 
Old 10-02-2007, 02:24 AM   #6
LaughingBoy
Member
 
Registered: May 2006
Location: Adelaide, South Australia
Distribution: Fedora 6-17 x64 / Ubuntu 10.x x64
Posts: 95

Rep: Reputation: 16
How about the AMD options? I've worked on a Tyan S4882 with 4x Dual core 800-series CPUs. Now, that's a nice work horse...
 
Old 10-02-2007, 03:30 AM   #7
townie
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2007
Distribution: Ubuntu 8.10 beta and Debian etch
Posts: 75

Rep: Reputation: 15
i go with the 3 rd options 4 cores at 2.4 ghz cause its kinda in the middle of the spectrum
 
Old 10-02-2007, 05:02 AM   #8
Caesar Tjalbo
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2006
Location: Enschede, The Netherlands
Distribution: sidux
Posts: 91

Rep: Reputation: 16
Just out of curiosity: as a desktop user with no large calculations or compilations to do, what's the point in having more than 2 cores? Or high clockspeed for that matter? I understand faster is better but it doesn't happen that often that I'm waiting on an application which doesn't involve lots of disc activity and I believe faster also means more power & cooling needed, in that I'd gain the most from having lots of fast RAM, I think.
So, what can I use more cores for?
 
Old 10-03-2007, 01:29 AM   #9
LaughingBoy
Member
 
Registered: May 2006
Location: Adelaide, South Australia
Distribution: Fedora 6-17 x64 / Ubuntu 10.x x64
Posts: 95

Rep: Reputation: 16
Arrow Share it around!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Caesar Tjalbo View Post
Just out of curiosity: as a desktop user with no large calculations or compilations to do, what's the point in having more than 2 cores? Or high clockspeed for that matter? I understand faster is better but it doesn't happen that often that I'm waiting on an application which doesn't involve lots of disc activity and I believe faster also means more power & cooling needed, in that I'd gain the most from having lots of fast RAM, I think.So, what can I use more cores for?
One core for the O.S. to play with and page (if necessary), and the other for the application you are using.

If you're not doing any major grunt work (games / photo manipulation / video copying), then 2x cores of the slowest you can find would be fine.

Have a look at the new AMD BE series. The BE2300 or BE2350 consume no more than 45W (compared to 69-85) and don't need to spin fans as fast, so they're quieter too.

HTH,

L.B.
 
Old 10-03-2007, 07:54 AM   #10
townie
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2007
Distribution: Ubuntu 8.10 beta and Debian etch
Posts: 75

Rep: Reputation: 15
also generally the more cores you have teh greater the cache on the processor allowoing for faster memory retrieval.. but if you have high speed ram and a high speed memory bus on your bored then there isnt much point other then for bragging rights
 
Old 10-03-2007, 08:09 AM   #11
jay73
Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Location: Belgium
Distribution: Ubuntu 11.04, Debian testing
Posts: 5,019

Rep: Reputation: 130Reputation: 130
Yep, give me the octo core with 256MB of RAM and a single hard drive. Do you get what I mean? Most people will find that other components are the bottleneck .
 
Old 10-03-2007, 09:47 AM   #12
Caesar Tjalbo
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2006
Location: Enschede, The Netherlands
Distribution: sidux
Posts: 91

Rep: Reputation: 16
I have too little technical background to fully understand the issues around multi-core. With a bit of googling it's easy to find some information but it usually focuses on 2 angles:
- multi-core processing works great for applications that have been designed/programmed with multiple threads/processes (whatever's more appropriate here) in mind,
- the Linux SMP kernel with scheduler performs load balancing, distributing threads/processes over the cores available.

What I'm missing here is how much effect a desktop user will experience by running several apps that haven't been developed specifically for parallel processing ('enough' apps to put an interesting load on the system, whatever that may be). Or a different view: what's the role of the window manager on a multi-core system? Is the WM simply unaware of the amount of CPUs and has it have the kernel sorting things out or do I need a multi-core WM in order to see all cores being used effectively?

A recent entry on the Coding Horror blog has something about clockspeed vs 2 - 4 cores. It's Windows centric and raises more questions than it answers (see comments) but it's on topic here:
Code:
http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/archives/000942.html
in short: a 3.0GHz 2-core often gives better performance than a 2.4GHz 4-core. YMMV, of course.
 
Old 10-03-2007, 12:49 PM   #13
jay73
Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Location: Belgium
Distribution: Ubuntu 11.04, Debian testing
Posts: 5,019

Rep: Reputation: 130Reputation: 130
Well, it may be important that current quad cores are not "pure" quad core yet afaik. Just like Pentium D, they simply stitch two CPUs together rather than integrating them into a proper unit.
 
Old 10-04-2007, 09:33 AM   #14
fobbio
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Oct 2007
Distribution: RHEL/Fedora Core
Posts: 26

Rep: Reputation: 15
Higher counts on cores allow you to do more at once. But there is a catch, packing too many cores on a single die does diminish the entire CPU's efficiency when it comes to getting data from memory. You're effectively dividing your FSB by the number of cores.

But then again, Tillera has a 64 Core chip already out, with plans to roll out a 128 core chip before 2010.
 
Old 10-04-2007, 11:41 AM   #15
evildarknight
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Location: Paradise Mauritius
Distribution: Debian lenny, Jlime,Delilinux
Posts: 57

Rep: Reputation: 15
8 cores the way to go.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
linux on multiple cores reslowgr Linux - Server 1 01-20-2007 03:35 PM
how to find number of cores in CPU narensr Linux - Hardware 5 08-24-2006 01:09 PM
Cores on Fedora jonty_11 Fedora 2 11-05-2004 09:25 AM
Problems with centrino clockspeed chichibabin Linux - Laptop and Netbook 3 02-07-2004 02:14 AM
Question : catching cores Saeven Linux - General 2 06-13-2002 04:29 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:24 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration