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Having trouble installing a piece of hardware? Want to know if that peripheral is compatible with Linux?

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Old 07-07-2008, 02:06 PM   #1
claudermilk
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Budget build compatibility


I'm updating an ancient server running RH7 to newer hardware to run either Ubuntu 8.04, or more likely openSuSE 11 & wanted to double check component compatibility. I expect it should be ok, but can't find anything specific. So the list goes:

MSI P6NGM-FD mobo with nVidia 7100 northbridge/video, nForce 630i southbridge, Realtek8211BL LAN, and Realtek ALC888 audio (don't much care about audio).
Intel Celeron E1200 1.6GHz dual-core
Lite-On LTD-163 DVD-ROM
NEC NR-7900A CD-RW
Seagate Barracuda ST380013AS SATA II drives (3x)
 
Old 07-07-2008, 03:06 PM   #2
BobNutfield
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These components are fairly in widespread use and any recent Linux distro should work and perform just fine with them. The Realtek audio is no problem (I have it myself on a laptop), and the LAN is no problem. Some Realtek wireless can be very troublesome, but not the wired flavor. The SATA drives are no issue. Either of the two distros mentioned will handle this hardware just fine. I haven't used OpenSuse 11 except as a liveCD, but I know Ubuntu well, and it will work fine with that hardware.

Bob
 
Old 07-07-2008, 05:14 PM   #3
onebuck
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Hi,

I agree with Bob. You should look at the 'HCL' the link is on the menu bar.
 
Old 07-07-2008, 09:55 PM   #4
IsaacKuo
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One thing I do is read the customer reviews of hardware on NewEgg (even if I intend to buy from elsewhere). I read through, skimming to find the ones where the reviewer was using Linux. If they're short and sweet, simply saying it worked with Ubuntu or Fedora or whatever, then that's good. Obviously, it's best when the reviewer is using the exact same Linux distribution you intend to use.
 
Old 07-07-2008, 10:02 PM   #5
lazlow
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If you are already used to RH I would consider Centos. Centos is RHEL(RedHat Enterprise Linux) with the logos removed. It has a five year support life(at least) and is free to download/update. The current version is 5.2. RH dropped the RHX after RH9 and switched to RHELX.
 
Old 07-08-2008, 01:27 PM   #6
claudermilk
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Thanks for the replies. Looks like Newegg ran out of that mobo openbox. So, I'm now looking at an AMD build using the BIOSTAR MCP6P-M2 and AMD Sempron 2.0GHz (now gives about a $35 advantage to AMD). The chipsets are similar, just different model numbers so I expect they ought to work as well. Missed the HCL here, and it's much more complete than anywhere else; I found enough fairly close hardware to make me believe either mobo ought to work fine. Once I get things set up, I'll post to the HCL to help expand it.
 
Old 07-08-2008, 03:41 PM   #7
onebuck
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Hi,

You could look at geeks.com or tigerdirect.com.
 
Old 07-08-2008, 06:41 PM   #8
Electro
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You should use a multi-processor system and include ECC memory. Sempron are only a single processor. I suggest a AMD Athlon X2 4050e.

When I look for a motherboard, I look at what hardware it contains for the NIC, sound card, video, IEEE-1394, and storage controller.

Seagate SATA hard drives have problems in Linux. Also they are not good for a server and OK for desktops. Western Digital Raptor series is a lot better for a server.
 
Old 07-09-2008, 11:42 AM   #9
claudermilk
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I realize it's a single-core. Dual-cores are quite nice--that's what I'm running on my main workstation, however, does a lightly-loaded web server really need the power? My current server is an ancient HP with a 350MHz P1 (yes, really) and does fine serving pages; I think the single 2GHz processor ought to be plenty for my needs. The 4050e is 2x the cost. I looked at the dual-core Celeron because it was pretty cheap--the second core was an unexpected bonus; now that the uber cheap mobo is gone the Intel route is about 20%+ more expensive due entirely to mobo & processor.

With the drives, as I said, I'm stealing existing hardware to keep costs down. The Raptors, while nice & fast instantly double the total build cost. What exactly are the problems the Seagate SATAs have in Linux, and are there workarounds? I've had good luck with the drives to date (9 drives between two desktops & a portable device), though I have had issues with the SiI 3114 & the drives in a Windows environment--the 3132 chipset works much better. The mobo I'm looking at appears to use the nVidia SATA controller.

This is a home server with a couple of small, lightly-trafficked websites. It's not going to be handling heavy loads. I may also use it as a print server and/or file server for the home network. So, I don't need ultimate performance out of it. I am making compromises to keep costs down. I do appreciate the comments, and am taking every one under consideration.
 
Old 07-09-2008, 12:19 PM   #10
IsaacKuo
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I use a 1.8Ghz Sempron for my main workstations and HTPCs. They're no slouches, and will provide plenty of computing power for a lightly loaded web server.

(My file server is similar in power to your current server. It has a 333mhz Celeron. I could put a spare 550mhz Pentium 3 into it instead, but I don't need the extra horsepower for a file server.)
 
Old 07-09-2008, 09:26 PM   #11
onebuck
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Hi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by Electro View Post
You should use a multi-processor system and include ECC memory. Sempron are only a single processor. I suggest a AMD Athlon X2 4050e.

When I look for a motherboard, I look at what hardware it contains for the NIC, sound card, video, IEEE-1394, and storage controller.

Seagate SATA hard drives have problems in Linux. Also they are not good for a server and OK for desktops. Western Digital Raptor series is a lot better for a server.
Most servers that I've worked on use 'WD' HDD. The ones with Seagate have issues, especially with heat.
 
Old 07-09-2008, 10:11 PM   #12
lazlow
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While Seagate drives tend to run hotter (designed that way), I have not had any issues with them. That being said, I think all drive manufactures have good models and bad models. When 250GB drives were the sweet spot there was a WD that was a real lemon, most WD drives are fine.
 
Old 07-09-2008, 11:03 PM   #13
onebuck
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Hi,

I don't disagree with your statements. I just have found most of my problems with Seagate have been heat related for servers.
 
Old 07-12-2008, 12:16 PM   #14
claudermilk
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If heat is all that it is, I'll be fine. These drives have been running in a way overloaded box for a couple of years with no issues at all. Thanks for all the comments.
 
  


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