LinuxQuestions.org
Visit Jeremy's Blog.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Hardware
User Name
Password
Linux - Hardware This forum is for Hardware issues.
Having trouble installing a piece of hardware? Want to know if that peripheral is compatible with Linux?

Notices



Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 03-20-2013, 05:51 PM   #1
Tecolote
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Posts: 69

Rep: Reputation: 0
Are IDE/PATA & SATA DVD burners compatible?


By compatible, I mean can I use an internal IDE/PATA DVD burner to copy a DVD or CD to an internal SATA DVD burner...or vice versa? I'm looking at the data transfer speed differences, and suspect this will not work, but need a definitive answer.
 
Old 03-20-2013, 06:11 PM   #2
273
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2011
Location: UK
Distribution: Debian Sid AMD64, Raspbian Wheezy, various VMs
Posts: 3,576

Rep: Reputation: 806Reputation: 806Reputation: 806Reputation: 806Reputation: 806Reputation: 806Reputation: 806
Not a definitive answer, sorry, but trying to copy directly from one optical medium to another sounds like a recipe for fail to me. Have you managed to get this to work on any system?
Otherwise, the "normal" way to do this involves an ISO image on your hard drive and will work no matter which optical drives you have.
If I'm mistaken then apologies and if you use the faster drive to read there's no more reason it ought to fail than normal.
 
Old 03-20-2013, 06:17 PM   #3
rknichols
Senior Member
 
Registered: Aug 2009
Distribution: CentOS
Posts: 1,624

Rep: Reputation: 677Reputation: 677Reputation: 677Reputation: 677Reputation: 677Reputation: 677
I think you would have a hard time finding a new SATA DVD burner and media combination that could write faster than an older PATA DVD drive could read. The interface data rates will not be the limiting factor. And in any event, a drive can be instructed to write at a slower rate, which generally produces a more reliable burn anyway.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 03-21-2013, 12:05 AM   #4
haertig
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2004
Distribution: Debian, Ubuntu, LinuxMint, Slackware, SysrescueCD
Posts: 2,032

Rep: Reputation: 309Reputation: 309Reputation: 309Reputation: 309
I've done this lots of times. Why do you think there would be a problem?

The easiest way to kill a CD/DVD being burned is to run the buffer of data feeding the burning process dry. This can happen if the buffer is not being filled as fast as it is being emptied. This should not normally be an issue going from optical drive to optical drive because just about every drive I've seen reads faster than it writes. But these days, with "burn free" technology in most every optical drive, it is not so much of an issue. Maybe if you have a damaged source CD/DVD that requires multiple attempts to read sectors you might have a problem. The bigger issue will be if you are using your computer for something else during the burning process and the computer just can't keep up with the data transfer needed. For example, it would probably not be a good idea to be multi-tasking and transcoding a video at the same time you are attempting to burn a DVD. Some powerful computers might be able to handle that task, but it would be problematic for many.

Also, don't think that a SATA drive is going to burn any faster than a PATA drive. While the interface may be faster, it is the drive and media itself that is the bottleneck. Even the fastest optical drive in the world isn't operating anywhere near the SATA interface speed. Nowhere near the PATA interface speed either. Your expectations would be like putting a bicycle on a straight and level six lane highway and expecting it to suddenly go 300 mph simply because the road itself might be able to support that speed. The bicycle can't, and that's what limits things. The bicycle will go just as fast on a two lane highway as it will on a six lane highway.

For that matter, if you have a mechanical hard drive like most of us do (not one of the new solid state ones) you don't need a SATA-III interface. That mechanical harddrive won't even keep up with SATA-II speeds, let alone SATA-III.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-04-2013, 05:21 PM   #5
Tecolote
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Posts: 69

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by haertig View Post
I've done this lots of times. Why do you think there would be a problem?

The easiest way to kill a CD/DVD being burned is to run the buffer of data feeding the burning process dry. This can happen if the buffer is not being filled as fast as it is being emptied. This should not normally be an issue going from optical drive to optical drive because just about every drive I've seen reads faster than it writes. But these days, with "burn free" technology in most every optical drive, it is not so much of an issue. Maybe if you have a damaged source CD/DVD that requires multiple attempts to read sectors you might have a problem. The bigger issue will be if you are using your computer for something else during the burning process and the computer just can't keep up with the data transfer needed. For example, it would probably not be a good idea to be multi-tasking and transcoding a video at the same time you are attempting to burn a DVD. Some powerful computers might be able to handle that task, but it would be problematic for many.

Also, don't think that a SATA drive is going to burn any faster than a PATA drive. While the interface may be faster, it is the drive and media itself that is the bottleneck. Even the fastest optical drive in the world isn't operating anywhere near the SATA interface speed. Nowhere near the PATA interface speed either. Your expectations would be like putting a bicycle on a straight and level six lane highway and expecting it to suddenly go 300 mph simply because the road itself might be able to support that speed. The bicycle can't, and that's what limits things. The bicycle will go just as fast on a two lane highway as it will on a six lane highway.

For that matter, if you have a mechanical hard drive like most of us do (not one of the new solid state ones) you don't need a SATA-III interface. That mechanical harddrive won't even keep up with SATA-II speeds, let alone SATA-III.
Was definitely hoping I'd not need to have three dvd burners to copy DVDs, so very glad to hear an internal IDE/PATA burner will copy to an internal SATA burner. Do you have any preferences for brands/model numbers of either? I was wanting Plextor, but keep reading horror stories of Linux problems, and the more I research it, the more burners seem not to be Linux friendly.
 
Old 04-04-2013, 05:31 PM   #6
Tecolote
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Posts: 69

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Hello

Quote:
Originally Posted by 273 View Post
Not a definitive answer, sorry, but trying to copy directly from one optical medium to another sounds like a recipe for fail to me. Have you managed to get this to work on any system?
Otherwise, the "normal" way to do this involves an ISO image on your hard drive and will work no matter which optical drives you have.
If I'm mistaken then apologies and if you use the faster drive to read there's no more reason it ought to fail than normal.
No, this will be my first home PC. Been stuck with public computers, so never copied a DVD, or even burned one, and of course, never used Linux. So if I understand you, you're saying I don't need two DVD burners? I put in the DVD, download contents to hard drive, replace DVD with blank one, then burn it? I always assumed some insist on having two burners because it was necessary to copy CDs/DVDs. Not true?
 
Old 04-04-2013, 05:47 PM   #7
273
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2011
Location: UK
Distribution: Debian Sid AMD64, Raspbian Wheezy, various VMs
Posts: 3,576

Rep: Reputation: 806Reputation: 806Reputation: 806Reputation: 806Reputation: 806Reputation: 806Reputation: 806
I'll admit I'm not entirely sure about CDs but for DVDs you can most certainly copy the image to your hard drive then burn it to as many discs as you want and I think you can do it for CDs also. Most DVD copying software for Linux gives you the option "create .iso image only" or similar. Then you just burn from the .iso as you would to create a Linux install disc.
I was likely wrong about copying drive-to-drive being flaky as my experience of it was a while back and I may have been using flaky media. Copying via .iso was a lot more reliable.
 
Old 04-04-2013, 08:09 PM   #8
SharpyWarpy
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2003
Location: Florida
Distribution: Fedora 18
Posts: 862

Rep: Reputation: 90
Personally I recommend you copy the DVD to your HDD first. This can be done easily with
Code:
mplayer dvd://1 -dumpstream -dumpfile title1.vob
Then see if the size is right, 4.4gb is a safe number. If it's too big you'll have to demux and shrink the video part with tcrequant, but maybe you won't have to do that. If the size is within limits then demux with
Code:
tcextract -i title1.vob -t vob -x ac3 > title1.ac3 2> /dev/null
and then
Code:
tcextract -i title1.vob -t vob -x mpeg2 > title1.m2v 2> /dev/null
. You'll remux them with
Code:
mplex -f 8 -o title1.mpg title1.m2v title1.ac3
. Play it back with
Code:
mplayer title1.mpg
to see if audio and video are in sync. If so you're ready to run dvdauthor
Code:
dvdauthor -t -f title1.mpg -o dvd_fs
then run
Code:
dvdauthor -T -o dvd_fs
The last two steps create the dvd file system in directory "dvd_fs". You can then burn with
Code:
growisofs -Z /dev/sr0 -dvd-video dvd_fs
where /dev/sr0 is your burner. Your burner might be either drive, /dev/sr0 or /dev/sr1.
 
Old 04-04-2013, 09:16 PM   #9
haertig
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2004
Distribution: Debian, Ubuntu, LinuxMint, Slackware, SysrescueCD
Posts: 2,032

Rep: Reputation: 309Reputation: 309Reputation: 309Reputation: 309
You do not need two drives to copy either DVDs or CDs. I have two drives, but usually only use one. I recommend the LiteOn brand as these are known for being able to read damaged disks better that many other brands. For WRITING to media, the NEC drives have a good reputation (but they also have a poor reputation for READING damaged media).

Quote:
Originally Posted by SharpyWarpy View Post
Code:
mplayer dvd://1 -dumpstream -dumpfile title1.vob
Assuming you want the second title (as an example, because you can no longer assume the first title is what you want these days), and assuming you want the English soundtrack (which is not always the the first audio track these days, which is what the default is set to for mplayer and tcextract), and assuming your source drive is /dev/sr0, being more specific in what you ask for is always better:

mplayer -nocache -dumpvideo -dumpfile movie.m2v dvdnav://2///dev/sr0
and
mplayer -nocache -alang en -dumpaudio -dumpfile movie.ac3 dvdnav://2///dev/sr0

There is not need to create the intermediate vob file (that just wastes disk space that you may not have, if only temporarily). Newer DVD's often require "dvdnav" rather than "dvd" (actually, it is the copy protections use of bad sectors that requires this), and dvdnav additionally requires nocache.

Quote:
Code:
mplex -f 8 -o title1.mpg title1.m2v title1.ac3
This will sometimes give errors if mplex needs to split the output files, because you haven't given it anything to split to.

Better to use:

mplex -f 8 -O 500 -o movie%.mpg movie.m2v movie.ac3

That "-O 500" part you may or may not need to get the audio and video in sync. "-O 500" is what you would use if the audio was falling 500 milliseconds AHEAD of the video. You would use "-O -500" if the audio was 500 milliseconds BEHIND the video. If they were in sync, leave out the -O option. If you need more than 500 milliseconds of adjustment, obviously change that 500 in the example to whatever number you need. I have found that more often than not, 500 is the value you need. But there are cases when that is not enough or too much. You probably don't need more resolution than increments of 500 when adjusting sync, say, 500, 1000, or 1500. Your eye/ear just is not that accurate to where you could tell the different between, say 376 and 500 as a sync adjustment.

Quote:
Code:
dvdauthor -T -o dvd_fs
Some builds of dvdauthor will require you to specify the output format by prepending VIDEO_FORMAT=NTSC in front of the dvdauthor command (or in some other manner set that environment variable). This was a bug in some builds of dvdauthor which is probably fixed, but if your version is not fixed, this workaround is nice to know.

If your mplex command resulted in split output files, you will need to adjust the dvdauthor command to take that into account. Typically I use the -x option to dvdauthor to specify an XML file that contains the necessary instructions.

Quote:
Code:
growisofs -Z /dev/sr0 -dvd-video dvd_fs
After burning, some systems may eject the DVD and then suck it back in, causing it to start playing. If yours does this, and you don't desire it, add the following option to the growisofs command:

-use-the-force-luke=notray
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Using command-line to tell if a drive is 3.5/2.5 and ide/sata/pata ? MikeyCarter Linux - Software 3 07-22-2011 04:48 PM
Move a Windows XP system from IDE (PATA) to SATA pnellesen General 1 12-20-2009 06:22 AM
sr_mod for dvd drive to use ide-cd of old pata driver set-howto deepclutch Linux - Hardware 5 11-16-2007 05:33 AM
SATA + PATA IDE Drives Not Playing Nice Together Mahonri Linux - Hardware 5 05-22-2007 05:40 PM
Any DVD burners compatible? xemophora Linux - Hardware 4 08-17-2003 05:07 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:32 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration