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Old 06-27-2008, 06:32 PM   #1
mongoosecage
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After SDcard changed to ext2 from ntfs, card can't be mounted


I changed my SD card from ntfs to ext2 for the familiar linux project on my hp1930/1940. Now it can't be mounted on Ubuntu even. Is there any fix to this.

I know it was a stupid risky move but I just wanted to see a penguin on my pocketpc rather than a window.
 
Old 06-27-2008, 10:05 PM   #2
r00tb33r
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Originally Posted by mongoosecage View Post
I changed my SD card from ntfs to ext2 for the familiar linux project on my hp1930/1940. Now it can't be mounted on Ubuntu even. Is there any fix to this.

I know it was a stupid risky move but I just wanted to see a penguin on my pocketpc rather than a window.
While you are not really describing how exactly you are trying to mount it and how it fails, if you are worried that you lost usability of the card, fdisk can help you fix that. Many devices like cameras will format it for you. Try a standard USB SD reader and see if it you can mount.
 
Old 06-28-2008, 08:16 AM   #3
mongoosecage
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While you are not really describing how exactly you are trying to mount it and how it fails, if you are worried that you lost usability of the card, fdisk can help you fix that. Many devices like cameras will format it for you. Try a standard USB SD reader and see if it you can mount.
Yea well its not being read through the card reader. I dont even know whats the mount point exactly. As you suggested I might try putting it into a camera of some sort.
 
Old 06-28-2008, 01:01 PM   #4
r00tb33r
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Yea well its not being read through the card reader. I dont even know whats the mount point exactly. As you suggested I might try putting it into a camera of some sort.
Actually before you do anything, plug it into your computer and open /etc/mtab and see if its mounted, or otherwise read on.
There. Well sounds like you need to know how to manually mount a filesystem.
Now as you probably might know, in Linux we use so called "device files" to represent a device, or a certain memory range on it. For example, depending on the kind of hard drive you have, IDE drives will have hdX naming, hdXN will be their partitions, or for SATA and SCSI sdX and sdXN, where X is the drive channel on bus, alphabetical starting from "a", and N which is the partition number on the drive. When using fdisk always specify the device file of the drive, such as /dev/hda, without any partition numbers. When using mkfs to format the partitions created in fdisk, specify the device file with the partition number, such as hda1.
I've never used internal card readers on Linux so let's assume you are using a simple USB SD reader dongle. For me USB drives identify in device files in two ways, sdXN and ubXN. While most flash drives get ubXN, I have one that identifies as an external hard drive and gets sdXN, and so does my external hard drive.
Using fdisk try ub(a though z although you shouldnt have to try more than couple) and sd(a-z likewise) until you find the drive that matches in size your SD card and has the partition layout you think you have.
If you locate your SD card, try mounting the ext2 partition if indeed you have one by entering "mount [device file] [mount point]" if you don't know a good mount point, make one, "mkdir /mnt/mynewmntpt" and mount it there.
If you get an error saying that it's already mounted, you probably have an automounter that already took care of that and the only way I can guess where it is is by looking in /etc/mtab. Otherwise do "umount [devicefile]" with the partition number to unmount that filesystem. And try to mount it yourself.
I hope I've done it for you since my answer is alot more specific than your question.
 
  


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