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Old 11-02-2006, 08:01 AM   #1
lo900
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why linux distros are not compatible together?


Hi

I am Senior Sys Admin for Windows systems (113 severs and 8000+ users) I've been 16+ years in the computer field, few years back I fell in love with Linux (many reasons), and I want to be Linux Sys Admin too (a good one).

I have tried RH 9 then RH4 Centos 4.4 Fedora 3, 4 , 5 also Debian 3 and now Ubuntu "Dapper" it is now on my laptop.

my problem is how to become Linux Sys Admin, not RedHat Sys Admin or Debian Sys Admin ?

I have found that Linux distros are not compatible regarding file trees, maybe the general naming only but not file types and its contains (like config files or the logs, or the packeging of the software are not the same (for Ex. there is software packegrd for RH and another or dib ..etc)

I think you get my point.

why all those great developers re inventing the wheel for each distro.?

I am confused, and sad too

(excuse my English please) thanks


Lo900
 
Old 11-02-2006, 08:09 AM   #2
rickh
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If there was only one "Linux," it would be just like Windows or Apple. The broad range of distributions is a primary strength of this OS.

As a SysAdmin, you will find that the similarities are far more numerous than the differences.
 
Old 11-02-2006, 10:38 AM   #3
introuble
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Everyone is inventing a different type of tire, if you wish, which they think is the best model yet.

Spend a lot of time with Linux, try different distributions, get time to know each, and know a few intimately. Ultimately you'll realise that if given a distribution you haven't touched before, using previous experience/knowledge, and making analogys [not to mention some things are pretty much universal], you'll be able to handle that new distribution in a few hours/days by reading the documentation of the things which set it appart.
 
Old 11-02-2006, 12:51 PM   #4
haertig
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lo900
why all those great developers re inventing the wheel for each distro.?
Because there is no such thing as "the perfect wheel" for every situation. They're not reinventing it, they're fine tuning it for a purpose. The wheels on my car, while fine for driving around town, would not work well deployed on a troop transport on a battlefield. The concept of the wheel is the same in both circumstances, but the execution is not.

The Windows and MAC OS'es use the same wheel for most everything because it fits their needs. End users are not allowed to change these wheels, even though a different one might be better for a given application. This is part of the plan for these OS'es. It creates standardization and control, but at the expense of flexibility, adaptability, and expandability on the end-user side of the equation. Perfect for a commercial venture that makes its money doing things for, and selling things to, users. There is nothing wrong with this model. It is what it is ... a "commercial, for-profit" way of doing things. The last thing they want is some user improving on something they are trying to sell for a profit.

Linux users understand that it's just a wheel, and usually have no problem adapting to wheels made out of titanium rather than steel, or 16 inch diameter ones as opposed to 15 inchers. It's just a round thing that rolls in concept. The color, size or decoration may be noticeable, but superfluous to its basic purpose.
 
Old 11-03-2006, 12:55 AM   #5
lo900
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you make me look at it in deferent way now.

thanks,

Lo900
 
Old 11-03-2006, 01:29 AM   #6
pixellany
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Think of Linux and Open Source as the world biggest erector set. You are given the ability to put it together any way you want it. You also have the choice of standardized distros for the corporate environment where the IT folks are IN CONTROL.

In Windows, about all you can do is tweak the registry---I'm getting sick just thinking about it....
 
Old 11-04-2006, 01:35 AM   #7
lo900
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I have found this on the net, GoboLinux

for me it make some sense

any idea why linux will not use at least something similar?

Lo900
 
Old 11-04-2006, 09:14 AM   #8
pixellany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lo900
I have found this on the net, GoboLinux

for me it make some sense

any idea why linux will not use at least something similar?

Lo900
Interesting....
I think that they can be accused of being different just to be different, but their approach does make some sense.

The key thing in the Linux and OpenSource world is that you have a choice...
 
Old 11-04-2006, 01:05 PM   #9
tekhawkgaming
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really the only thing thats diffrent from distro to distro is the admin GUIs that each distro uses and some small differnces in where the files are stored "fedora" being one of the best at not keeping things where other distros have them

and then you have suse which wants you to partty your hard drive with a home / and swap not a bad idea and work for most people just learning linux

at the same time if every distro conformed would we have XGL today

and in all reality if you learn how to do it through command line then you can move from one distro to the next with little to no learning curve

my self i use Suse 10.1 at home and on my home server and most pcs i bui;ld for people how ever i install ubuntu for most businesses that i set up networks server and work stations for feeling that ubuntu is vary stable amd that gnome is great for that type of area

me being a kde lover i install it on most pcs that i set up for people becuase most people like to make their home pc their pc and i feel kde lets you do this best and suse "thanks to the packman repo and their non-oss repo" make it really easy to get it up to home user levels "mp3 etc" and Amarok is the best music player ive ever used and it works best on KDE desktops


-----------
need to set up a sig lol

http://www.tekhawk.com
 
Old 11-04-2006, 02:26 PM   #10
Grife
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I've wondered exactly the same thing. At least keep the damn root folder similar in every distribution, please. Like in this Ubuntu I have folder called "media" under /. Oookay... wasn't there in BestLinux 3 years ago when I last time played with linuxes.
 
Old 11-04-2006, 02:54 PM   #11
robbbert
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Quote:
I am Senior Sys Admin for Windows systems (113 severs and 8000+ users)...

my problem is how to become Linux Sys Admin, not RedHat Sys Admin or Debian Sys Admin ?
I'm understanding that, completely, but: Learn to choose.

Either generalize, or specialise.

/Me, as a --not-so-former -- Windows developer, is specialising in Debian-based Linux administration (that is, Ubuntu--NOT RHEL and not SEL), database development (that is, PostgreSQL and Firebird--but NOT mySQL, Oracle, Derby or others), and web development (that is, J2EE with MyFaces and Hibernate--but NOT Struts, and not JDO or other upcoming streams).

I'm hoping to will have learned enough by the way, to get into the other aforementioned fields--when time would tell there's a special need. (In other words, I'm relying on "implicit" training in other fields.)

However, it's about getting the big picture--and then, about choice.

P.S.: A homogeneous large company with 8,000 Ubuntu client PCs probably wouldn't run worse than with your Windows environment.

Thanks
Robert

Last edited by robbbert; 11-04-2006 at 02:56 PM.
 
Old 11-04-2006, 03:20 PM   #12
robbbert
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I'd like to add to my post:

I (with one colleage) have been the one who got our company the "Microsoft Partner" status. That means, we're getting all their software for free--for development purposes, at least.--So there wouldn't be a need for me to change.

As a "Microsoft guy", I would use the latest version of Windows, SQL Server, Visual Studio, and Office--nevertheless, I've chosen to change to FOSS (free and open source software).

Reasons: My personal, financial situation became harder and I wasn't able to buy a current PC. Using Ubuntu (and amending it to my needs, I was able to still have a modern, full-fledged working environment.)
Todays, customers come in and ask for solutions, offering only 20-50% of the price they were willing to pay just few years ago.--I believe, that if SQL Server costs $15,000, and if PostgreSQL serves equally well, customers could spare the license fees, and thus, add some bucks to the development costs.--The same with Microsoft Office, and, at last, with the complete Windows operation system.

I really believe the costs for amending open source solutions are often lower than just going with the big, commercial guys.

Thanks again
 
  


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