LinuxQuestions.org
Help answer threads with 0 replies.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General
User Name
Password
Linux - General This Linux forum is for general Linux questions and discussion.
If it is Linux Related and doesn't seem to fit in any other forum then this is the place.

Notices

Reply
 
LinkBack Search this Thread
Old 03-05-2008, 12:05 PM   #16
gcarrillo
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Location: Austin, TX
Distribution: Ubuntu, Solaris
Posts: 4

Rep: Reputation: 0
An itch scratched!


Thanks dragonslayer48dx!

The idea that /usr once contained users' directories seems totally likely to me and satisfies my curiosity concerning /usr and its expansion. And while such a discussion may seem nitpicky to some, the ability to read between these lines really does affect ones ability to really understand the system.
 
Old 03-06-2008, 05:27 AM   #17
indeliblestamp
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2006
Distribution: Fedora
Posts: 341
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 38
I very vaguely remember reading somewhere that /usr was the second-level heirarchy used for multi-user applications.
I mean like: /bin and /sbin and /lib are used for the core, really essential files that you'd need at init 1 for a basic boot-up. The next level of folders i.e. /usr/bin, /usr/sbin /usr/lib etc are used by apps running on runlevel 3 onwards (And one step deeper in the tree is /usr/local which also has a similar directory set).
That line of reasoning did make some sense for me.. / is for root's applications, /usr is for the users'.
 
Old 03-13-2008, 07:04 AM   #18
theYinYeti
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Location: France
Distribution: Arch Linux
Posts: 1,897

Rep: Reputation: 61
/ contains all resources needed to boot, and only that: boot into a bare environment.

Non-essential applications are in /usr. In big networks, /usr is often mounted from the network. With /usr mounted, the system is a lot more usable.

/usr/local is where the administrator of the local machine stores non-essential stuff for his machine only. So you have /usr that is mounted inside / and may come from the network, /usr/local that is mounted inside /usr and should NOT come from the network.
In most configurations though, as we usually deal with small networks, /usr is local, and /usr/local is on the same partition.

And /opt is another story

Yves.
 
Old 03-14-2008, 02:07 PM   #19
gcarrillo
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Location: Austin, TX
Distribution: Ubuntu, Solaris
Posts: 4

Rep: Reputation: 0
theYinYeti: that's interesting. I wonder then, if there's a 1:1 mapping of files between what's in "/" and what can be found in a miniroot. By your reasoning, we might expect this to be the case.
 
Old 03-17-2008, 11:37 AM   #20
sanalmadatheth
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: 0
how to make nano functionable in debian? how 2 schedule it for downloading on a particular time?
Dear friends....I'm a beginner...what commands should b typed in 'nano'to schedule it for downloading at 2'O clock at night.Pls help me.pls spare some time to answer me....

Last edited by sanalmadatheth; 03-17-2008 at 11:40 AM.
 
Old 03-17-2008, 11:42 AM   #21
sanalmadatheth
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: 0
dear friends what is meant by 'curses'(for eg.'btdownloadcurses")?
 
Old 03-17-2008, 02:55 PM   #22
exceed1
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Location: oslo
Distribution: debian,redhat
Posts: 199

Rep: Reputation: 31
usr stands for "user-specific resources" and it fits quite nicly i think. it might be other abbreviations that is used with "usr" though, but i wouldnt know about them other then the ones ive read in this thread

Last edited by exceed1; 03-17-2008 at 02:58 PM.
 
Old 06-24-2012, 09:00 AM   #23
Bodi00
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jun 2012
Posts: 1

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
usr Abreviation

According to linux-training.be/files/books/html/fun/ch09s08.html, it stands for Unix System Resources.
 
  


Reply

Tags
downloading, friends, how, nano, schedule


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
what does the T in T1 stand for? jmral23 Linux - Networking 7 11-23-2009 07:22 AM
I can stand it no longer! The_Landlord Linux - Newbie 2 01-30-2005 11:42 AM
Stand By? driftingremains Linux - General 3 01-11-2004 11:46 AM
what does rc.d stand for? german Linux - General 4 11-13-2003 07:55 AM
Can't stand RPMs needamiracle Linux - General 25 09-12-2002 05:10 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:02 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration