LinuxQuestions.org
Visit Jeremy's Blog.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General
User Name
Password
Linux - General This Linux forum is for general Linux questions and discussion.
If it is Linux Related and doesn't seem to fit in any other forum then this is the place.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 04-18-2007, 07:00 PM   #1
WOP1337
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2006
Location: Tustin, CA
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 40

Rep: Reputation: 15
what does commercial linux/unix have that free ones dont?


taking away support, what does any commercial linux/unix have that a free one does not? are the commercial ones faster in some way? or if you know what you are doing with lets say Slackware or FreeBsd, could it be used for a supercomputer?
 
Old 04-18-2007, 07:52 PM   #2
MS3FGX
Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Location: NJ, USA
Distribution: Slackware, Debian
Posts: 5,852

Rep: Reputation: 351Reputation: 351Reputation: 351Reputation: 351
There is no real difference other than support.

Some distributions that have free and pay versions will strip features out of the free version to try and get people to by the pay version, but there is no technical reason for that, it is an artificial limitation.

There is, by nature of the way open source works, nothing you can do on one distributions that you can't do on another. Things might be a little different between each one, but the whole concept of the GPL ensures that no distribution can create a proprietary feature that the other's cant copy if they chose.
 
Old 04-18-2007, 08:30 PM   #3
chadl
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Location: US
Distribution: Gentoo AMD64 Testing
Posts: 129

Rep: Reputation: 16
There are some UNIX flavors such as Solaris that have fancy features (such as predictive healing, etc), but in almost every case there is a free program that will do the same thing.

When you pay for such software, when your boss comes breathing down your neck asking why X is not working, you can say that you will call up the company and ask them, rather then fixing it yourself (and taking the blame if your fix does not work).
 
Old 04-18-2007, 08:37 PM   #4
MS3FGX
Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2004
Location: NJ, USA
Distribution: Slackware, Debian
Posts: 5,852

Rep: Reputation: 351Reputation: 351Reputation: 351Reputation: 351
Incidentally, that is one of the primary reasons that small businesses are reluctant to switch over to Linux or OSS in general. They want somebody to clearly point the finger at when something goes wrong.

Same reason those business would rather by overpriced Dells than have somebody build their computers for them (or at the very least get them from one of the smaller computer manufacturers).

They want to know there is a huge company out there that will fix any problems they have, regardless of how well they actually will do that.
 
Old 04-19-2007, 04:33 AM   #5
ethics
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Location: London
Distribution: Arch - Latest
Posts: 1,522

Rep: Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by WOP1337
taking away support, what does any commercial linux/unix have that a free one does not? are the commercial ones faster in some way? or if you know what you are doing with lets say Slackware or FreeBsd, could it be used for a supercomputer?
They can also provide you with some form of protection against certain technologies through their licensing of such. For example Mp3 Codecs do not come standard with a lot of distros (whilst perhaps not useful for your scope, it illustrates the point and could be used for anything else).

Some commerical distros are also singulary supported by certain apps. Such as Orcale only supported it's use on Red Hat until they released their own distro.

I'd hate to have to explain why X won't work on Y when Y wasn't on their supported list to begin with. (which ties in to accountability for problems, as has already been mentioned).

I've never used a commercial disto, i have never need to.

When you have the choice to compile your own programs and kernel, how much 'better' can any other distro really be, in a technical sense.
 
Old 04-19-2007, 05:45 AM   #6
bigrigdriver
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Jul 2002
Location: East Centra Illinois, USA
Distribution: Debian Squeeze
Posts: 5,783

Rep: Reputation: 311Reputation: 311Reputation: 311Reputation: 311
Commercial distros may include proprietary (third party) software which is not included in the free version.

In re support, with commercials distros you get installation support. You can buy more comprehensive support contracts.
 
Old 04-19-2007, 06:08 AM   #7
dasy2k1
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: 127.0.0.1
Distribution: Ubuntu 12.04 X86_64
Posts: 958

Rep: Reputation: 35
you often get a printed manual aswell.

our fully comercial solaris sysyems at my work (very old solaris 2.6)
came with several manuals, (taking up a whole bookcase,)
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LXer: LightZone for Linux delivers commercial quality photo conversion for free LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 02-14-2007 04:31 PM
LXer: Retool your Linux skills for commercial UNIX LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 08-01-2006 01:54 AM
is my stage1 gentoo a 32bit or 64bit OS ? commercial games dont work ! qwijibow Linux - General 1 01-10-2005 11:50 PM
free linux/unix books for newbies chongluo General 1 04-06-2004 02:32 PM
Free UNIX/Linux/OS X Networking Utility??? cmf5150 Linux - Networking 2 01-05-2004 02:22 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:05 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration