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Old 05-11-2012, 05:24 PM   #1
dwmolyneux
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Question Using qemu to boot a full hardware installed Windows partion on dual boot system


This is more a curiosty type question to know if it would be possible.

I have a dual boot system with Linux Mint 12 and Windows XP.

I sometimes find that while I'm under Linux that I also need access to my Windows OS but not able to reboot just to access it.

I know that from a terminal you can run:
Code:
qemu -hda /dev/sda
that will bring up the grub bootloader to select the Windows partion to boot.

The problem I have ran in to is that qemu changes the hardware so that it causes the Blue Screen of Death when windows starts to load.

Is there an option or a way to config qemu to use the same hardware that windows expects when booting?
 
Old 05-11-2012, 05:43 PM   #2
Ser Olmy
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qemu is a hypervisor. The "hardware" in a virtual machine created by a hypervisor is all, well, virtual.

Unless the hypervisor is able to emulate the exact same hardware you happen to have inside your PC (extremely unlikely), the answer to your question is "no".

However, it may be possible to emulate hardware that Windows XP supports, avoiding the BSOD. Also, you could boot to Windows and install the necessary drivers for the virtualized hardware. In both cases, the same Windows installation should be able to boot successfully in the virtualized environment as well as on the bare metal hardware.

Unfortunately, you'd probably just run in to another problem, as (perceived) changes in the hardware configuration causes OEM versions of Windows to require reactivation. You'd be reactivating at every reboot.
 
Old 05-12-2012, 10:19 PM   #3
jefro
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Ser Olmy is correct. MS terms it the HAL.

The only other way is to find a copy of xp and create a new install. Finding xp copies is getting hard.
 
Old 05-12-2012, 11:18 PM   #4
dwmolyneux
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yes finding copies of windows xp is getting hard but luckly I do have 2 that were used on a couple of machines that are no more. This frees them up to be used for such a case.

I about a month ago I did try to do an install via qemu of windows xp but it gave me an error. As it was just a curiousity thing, I didn't do to much to trouble shoot it.

if qemu -hda /dev/sd* will boot it then what would I need to actauly install from the cd?
 
Old 05-13-2012, 08:54 AM   #5
allend
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Quote:
yes finding copies of windows xp is getting hard but luckly I do have 2 that were used on a couple of machines that are no more. This frees them up to be used for such a case.
Actually, this is not the case. When Windows XP is installed and registered, the product key is locked to that machine. You can change a graphics card, a network card, a disk drive but not a motherboard. Windows XP sees installation in a virtual machine as an installation onto a machine with a new motherboard. So Microsoft expects you to purchase and register a new product key. The perceived change in motherboard is also the cause of the BSOD due to HAL changes that you have observed when trying to access an existing Windows XP install.

You can do a virgin install of Windows XP in a virtual machine and you will get 30 days of use without registration. The nagging to register is annoying.

Microsoft does not like pirate copies of Windows XP that have the registration requirements removed, but with Windows XP official support ending in April 2014, users are being left with no choice if they have essential software that will not run in Windows7 (even in XP emulation).

One random reminiscence - During torrent storms pirates often shelter in bays.
 
Old 05-13-2012, 09:06 AM   #6
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by allend View Post
Actually, this is not the case. When Windows XP is installed and registered, the product key is locked to that machine.
This is technically incorrect. The key is not in any way bound to the hardware. The installation is. When you make a fresh install you can use the old keys. There may be legal restrictions in doing that, but that is dependent on where you live, in some countries you are not allowed to use a key for a different machine, in some countries (for example Germany) there is no problem in using the keys.
 
Old 05-13-2012, 09:28 AM   #7
allend
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Quote:
This is technically incorrect. The key is not in any way bound to the hardware. The installation is. When you make a fresh install you can use the old keys.
OK - Would have been better written as:
When Windows XP is installed and registered, the product key is locked to that machine for the life of the installation.
The definitive statement is here. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/307890

I should also have used the term activation rather than registration.

Last edited by allend; 05-13-2012 at 09:30 AM.
 
Old 05-13-2012, 09:57 AM   #8
onebuck
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Member response

Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by allend View Post
Actually, this is not the case. When Windows XP is installed and registered, the product key is locked to that machine. You can change a graphics card, a network card, a disk drive but not a motherboard. Windows XP sees installation in a virtual machine as an installation onto a machine with a new motherboard. So Microsoft expects you to purchase and register a new product key. The perceived change in motherboard is also the cause of the BSOD due to HAL changes that you have observed when trying to access an existing Windows XP install.

You can do a virgin install of Windows XP in a virtual machine and you will get 30 days of use without registration. The nagging to register is annoying.

Microsoft does not like pirate copies of Windows XP that have the registration requirements removed, but with Windows XP official support ending in April 2014, users are being left with no choice if they have essential software that will not run in Windows7 (even in XP emulation).

One random reminiscence - During torrent storms pirates often shelter in bays.
For OEM not retail Xp. If the license is a OEM the EULA states the license dies with that hardware. Retail purchase allows use of Xp on multiple machines. Meaning you can install on more than one machine but must insure that none will operate simultaneously. Retail package Xp would allow the use & registration of a VM install;
Quote:
A Windows XP license can only be used once on one
(1) computer. A second installation requires a second
license, even if its installed on the same computer.

From the Windows XP EULA:

1.1 Installation and use. You may install, use, access,
display and run one copy of the Software on a single
computer, such as a workstation, terminal or other
device ("Workstation Computer"). The Software may not
be used by more than two (2) processors at any one
time on any single Workstation Computer.

Please read your End-User License Agreement by going
to Start > Run and type: WINVER , and hit enter. Then
click on "End-User License Agreement".

If you already have a retail copy of Windows XP, you can obtain
an additional license by visiting the following Microsoft Web site: http://www.microsoft.com/products/in...romotions/wal/
You would retire on other licensed machines/insure that no simultaneous use of the licensed product key on multiple machines then re-register for the VM. Same issue as with upgrade equipment i.e; Motherboards, hard disk or sub-system support then the WPA would be activated/invoked therefore requiring registration of the license. Unless you have a corporate license copy or MSDN.

Plus you could legally run two copies (1-2 CPU Xp Pro) on the same multi-core system but not more than two therefore a VM would be possible (but why). Better way;
Quote:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_XP_Mode#Windows_XP_Mode
Windows XP Mode (XPM)[31] is a virtual machine package for Windows Virtual PC containing a pre-installed, licensed copy of Windows XP Professional with Service Pack 3 as its guest OS. Previously, both the CPU and motherboard of the host had to support hardware virtualization,[5] but an update in early 2010 eliminated this requirement.[32] Pre-installed integration components allow applications running within the virtualized environment to appear as if running directly on the host,[17][33] sharing the native desktop and Start Menu of Windows 7 as well as participating in file type associations. Windows XP Mode applications run in a Terminal Services session in the virtualized Windows XP, and are accessed via Remote Desktop Protocol by a client running on the Windows 7 host.[34][35]
Applications running in Windows XP Mode do not have compatibility issues, as they are actually running inside a Windows XP virtual machine and redirected using RDP to the Windows 7 host. For 64-bit editions of Windows 7, XP Mode may be used to run 16-bit applications; it includes NTVDM.
Windows XP Mode is available free of charge to users of Windows 7 Professional, Enterprise, and Ultimate.[30] Users of other editions of Windows 7 are not eligible to download and use it.[32][36] This restriction does not apply to Windows Virtual PC itself.
Windows XP Mode can also be run with the VMware Player and VMware Workstation. However, VMware products only import Windows XP Mode on Windows 7 Professional, Enterprise, or Ultimate to adhere with Microsoft licensing requirements.[37]
I can see the advantage of Win7 hosting a WinXp VM. Better too just purchase additional WinXp license for $35/per install for retail tag(not boxed) while you can.

It's getting were you need to be a lawyer or befriend one.
 
Old 05-13-2012, 12:11 PM   #9
jefro
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"if qemu -hda /dev/sd* will boot it then what would I need to actauly install from the cd" (?)

Generally for qemu you need to add in the -boot option and the added cdrom information. Linux and windows use similar but different terms. See qemu docs for full list of options.

If your only line was -hda /dev/sdx then we assume that the hda is the boot device. We don't know what is on that from here.
 
  


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