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Old 06-30-2012, 07:45 AM   #1
onebuck
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Thumbs up Understanding Linux Filesystems


Hi,

When migrating to a Gnu/Linux most Microsoft Windows user's have difficulties. First, remember that Linux is not Windows.

Especially with computer filesystem understandings. Some users are lacking knowledge about filesystems in general (UNIX filesystems basic understanding). Here is a simple article to get you started: The Linux Directory Structure Explained

You can get more links to information at: Linux File System

Especially;
Quote:
Understanding UNIX/Linux file system:
Part I <- Understanding Linux filesystems
Part II <- Understanding Linux superblock
Part III <- An example of Surviving a Linux Filesystem Failures
Part IV <- Understanding filesystem Inodes
Part V <- Understanding filesystem directories
Part VI <- Understanding UNIX/Linux symbolic (soft) and hard links
Part VII <- Why isn’t it possible to create hard links across file system boundaries?
Just a few more useful links;



Linux Documentation Project
Rute Tutorial & Exposition
Linux Command Guide
Linux Newbie Admin Guide
LinuxSelfHelp
Utimate Linux Newbie Guide


The above links and others can be found at 'Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!

HTH!

Last edited by onebuck; 06-30-2012 at 01:20 PM. Reason: correct link
 
Old 06-30-2012, 10:24 AM   #2
TobiSGD
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Nice work, but shouldn't this be rather in the Articles section?
 
Old 06-30-2012, 10:56 AM   #3
amani
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Articles -> Brief Guide would be better.
 
Old 06-30-2012, 01:08 PM   #4
honeybadger
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@onebuck -- hey the link that you posted as 'Linux Newbie Admin Guide' does not exist. Do you have an alternate link.
Thanks.

---------- Post added Jun 30th, 2012 at 02:08 PM ----------

@onebuck -- hey, the link that you posted as 'Linux Newbie Admin Guide' does not exist. Do you have an alternate link.
Thanks.
 
Old 06-30-2012, 01:19 PM   #5
onebuck
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Member Response

Hi,

@TobiSGD
I believe this thread is appropriate in <Linux-General>

@honeybadger
Correct link: Linux Newbie Admin Guide
 
Old 07-01-2012, 02:57 AM   #6
salasi
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...a great piece of work, so I feel a bit uncomfortable about making the suggestion that you should change it. However, here goes:

Primarily what your linked articles are about is the structure of the Linux FS and how directories are laid out. What it isn't about is a comparison of BTRFS, Ext4, Ext3, Nillfs, XFS, ramfs, tempfs, squashfs (do you ever get the feeling that we have enough of them, already?).

So, I'd like to see the word 'hierarchy' in the title to emphasise the layout bit and which files go where, rather than the 'what filesystem type should I use for my new install' aspect.
 
Old 07-01-2012, 07:25 AM   #7
onebuck
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Member Response

Hi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by salasi View Post
...a great piece of work, so I feel a bit uncomfortable about making the suggestion that you should change it. However, here goes:

Primarily what your linked articles are about is the structure of the Linux FS and how directories are laid out. What it isn't about is a comparison of BTRFS, Ext4, Ext3, Nillfs, XFS, ramfs, tempfs, squashfs (do you ever get the feeling that we have enough of them, already?).

So, I'd like to see the word 'hierarchy' in the title to emphasise the layout bit and which files go where, rather than the 'what filesystem type should I use for my new install' aspect.
Your points are valid and we as experienced Gnu/Linux users should share our understanding and perspectives. Salasi, I agree but most new users do not understand basic UNIX/Linux structures since most are coming from a different environment. I believe a new user should be aware of structures then build upon the knowledge with file system types. Comparison and personal choice for filesystems will evolve once the user(s) begins to get the feel for uses of a Gnu/Linux. The title was selected to expose to everyone, especially the new user.

For myself, I use the principle of 'KISS': Keep It Simple Stupid. Most of my systems use 'ext2/3/4' and I find no real need to change unless a specific application/use defines the need. The linked references, especially The Linux Directory Structure Explained does use some familiar terminology for a Microsoft OS user to give comparative definition(s) to make things a little easier to understand structure and hierarchy.

Sure filesystem comparisons would help a new user but after they do understand basic structure(S). Enhance the thread as it hopefully progresses.

I also use a modified 'KISS': Keep It Simply Slackware.
 
  


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