LinuxQuestions.org
Visit Jeremy's Blog.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General
User Name
Password
Linux - General This Linux forum is for general Linux questions and discussion.
If it is Linux Related and doesn't seem to fit in any other forum then this is the place.

Notices



Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 01-23-2006, 10:33 AM   #1
Luke771
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: Sol III, Milky Way
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 43

Rep: Reputation: 15
Triple boot Linux (Ubuntu 5.10), WinXP and MacOS (Tiger)


I have an AMD Duron 1600, 512 MB RAM and two 40GB HDDs, dual boot running Ubuntu 5.10 on hdb0 (Ext3) WinXP pro SP2 on hda0 (NTFS) with hda6 and hdb6 formatted as FAT32, and no free space left (but I do have Partition Magic that can resize partitions "almost" safely).
My hda drive is not very good, it still good enough to run Windows without any major problems but I get some I/O errors under Linux whent mounting the NTFS partition automatically with fstab (no biggie anyway, I mount it manually when I need it i.e. not often).
Now, what I'm planning to do is install Tiger on the same machine, making it a triple boot: I'm keeping my FAT32 paritions for data storage, as they are accsessible by all OSes, that way I only need a relatively small mac-partition to run Tiger and related programs while non-program files like video, music and so on will still be stored on FAT32 partitions.
Right now I am downloading Tiger-x86.tar.bz2, then I plan to resize my partitions on hdb (my "good hdd"), leave something like 7 or 8 GB of free space and install Tiger there.
The questions are:
Will 7 gig be enough? (I run WinXP on a 6GB partition (plus dedicated pagefile partition) and Ubuntu on another 6GB partition).
and most imprtant: How do I configure Grub (installed on MBR)?
I mean, when I install Tiger, it will probably modify the MBR, so I should back up the existing MBR, restore it after having installed Tiger and then manually add an entry pointing to Tiger: How do I do that?
I know I could google that up, but I didn't find any sufficiently foolprof walkthrough and I am no "real" computer geek myself; an "apprentice geek" maybe, but I still need help some times, and anyways, this is actually something that should be "easy-googled", and it will be when I get some answers, here :-)
Oh, yeah, AND I never installed any MacOS before (but I don't think that is a big problem)

OK, then, here come the questions again:
How much free space do I nead at least?
How do I back up and restore MBR and Grub?
How do I add an entry for Tiger in Grub?

Thanks for anwering

Last edited by Luke771; 01-23-2006 at 10:41 AM.
 
Old 01-24-2006, 03:27 AM   #2
bulliver
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Location: Edmonton AB, Canada
Distribution: Gentoo x86_64; Gentoo PPC; FreeBSD; OS X 10.9.4
Posts: 3,760
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 77
Quote:
How much free space do I nead at least?
7-8GB will be plenty...

Quote:
How do I back up and restore MBR and Grub?
It isn't necessary. If OS X does pooch your MBR, just boot your Ubuntu with a livecd, chroot to your '/' partition, and reinstall it to the MBR. If the MBR gets pooched, you will need a livecd to boot Ubuntu to restore the 'backup MBR' anyway right? Besides, I'm not even sure it is possible to back up an MBR in any meaningful way. I suppose you could 'dd' it somewhere, but where? I wouldn't stress about it.

Quote:
How do I add an entry for Tiger in Grub?
I've no idea, but I imagine you will need to chainload it, same as windows.
 
Old 01-24-2006, 07:46 AM   #3
Luke771
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: Sol III, Milky Way
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 43

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Thanks for the answer Bulliver; That fixes the part about backing up and restoring MBR.
The question about the Grub line stays, if someone wants to answer.
Restoring the pre- install MBR by running the Ubuntu istall CD in rescue mode and running
Code:
grub-install /dev/hda
should do the trick but I wonder if that will make the installer look for the installed operating system and create a new boot menu or it will simply restore the last boot menu, the one that the could have gotten screwed up by the MacOS install; in this case I should back /boot/grub/menu.lst up, manually restore it after installing Tiger and then run grub-install. I can try to just run grub-install and see what happens (with my menu.lst backup file safely stored on a FAT32 partition)...hmmm looks like it could work, but Murphy's law says that something will go wrong, and it will be the only thing I was not prepared for, which means that I am prepared for *all* the possible screw-ups, then everything will go smoothly because there is *nothing* left that could happen and I was not perpared for.
(OK, that's philosophy you find in dime-a-dozen books, I was only trying to be funny... and failed)
Anyways, the "Tiger-for-x86" file is at about 50% downloaded now, and I figured out that I can write a Grub menu line MacOS by copying the 3 or four lines that point to Windows and slightly modify them to make the entry point to Tiger instead and the menu show something like "MacOS Tiger" or something. The last part is a no-brainer, and I think I could at least try to figure out how to do the menu line by trial and error, but I would appreciate some help anyway.

So the question is still:
What is the line to make an entry in Grub pointing at MacOS Tiger?
I will install it in the free space located after the Linux partition on hdb? (Linux partition is hdb1).

And one more question is: I never istalled any MacOS before, is there something I should know? What problems can you typically get when installing MacOS on a multi boot system?
OK, I can look for those answers on some Mac forum, and I will, but I still would appreciate any anwers that can be posted here without turning this thread to an "iThread"; maybe something about the most common linux-mac dual boot problems (keeping in mind that I'm trying to triple boot with WinXP)

Last edited by Luke771; 01-24-2006 at 08:19 AM.
 
Old 01-24-2006, 08:52 AM   #4
bulliver
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Location: Edmonton AB, Canada
Distribution: Gentoo x86_64; Gentoo PPC; FreeBSD; OS X 10.9.4
Posts: 3,760
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 77
I don't think you fully understand how grub works. grub.conf presumably lives in the /boot or /etc directory of your Ubuntu install right, and the grub program itself lives in /sbin, so I can guarantee you it won't be touched by OS X (unless you accidently overwrite the entire Ubuntu install partition(s)) The only thing that will be overwritten is the wee bit of grub's executable code that lives on the MBR (this is the code your BIOS points the cpu to right after the POST test). Now this bit of code knows how to read your filesystem, where it finds your grub.conf and presents you with the menu you see.

So: the only thing you need to replace is this bit of code, and that is exactly what 'grub-install /dev/hda' does. And yes, you will need to update grub.conf manually. Grub does not 'look around' for OSs to boot, you have to tell it where they are. Maybe the slick Ubuntu install writes this file for you, but grub itself does not.

Quote:
Anyways, the "Tiger-for-x86" file is at about 50% downloaded now, and I figured out that I can write a Grub menu line MacOS by copying the 3 or four lines that point to Windows and slightly modify them to make the entry point to Tiger instead and the menu show something like "MacOS Tiger" or something. The last part is a no-brainer, and I think I could at least try to figure out how to do the menu line by trial and error, but I would appreciate some help anyway.
Exactly. Like I say, I am not too sure about this, but then, I don't think anyone is. OS X x86 is cutting edge, so there are no howtos for it. You are venturing into uncharted waters

But anyway, if an OS can't be directly booted like Linux, then it most likely needs to be chainloaded.

grub.conf entry will be like:
Code:
title Mac OS
root    (hdb2)
makeactive
chainloader +1
Quote:
And one more question is: I never installed any MacOS before, is there something I should know? What problems can you typically get when installing MacOS on a multi boot system?
Yeah, it goes like this: put in the cd, choose you language, and watch it copy files

Again, I have only used/installed it on PPC so this may be totally different. As for dual boot, again, I only know for PPC and grub does not work here. You need to use yaboot in place of grub on PPC hardware. I suggest you make backups of anything you cannot afford to lose from Ubuntu and Windows. Burn them to a cd, or otherwise make copies somewhere other than this PC. Don't want to discourage, but better safe than sorry right?

Last edited by bulliver; 01-24-2006 at 08:57 AM.
 
Old 01-24-2006, 10:31 AM   #5
Luke771
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: Sol III, Milky Way
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 43

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Thanks again
Quote:
The only thing that will be overwritten is the wee bit of grub's executable code that lives on the MBR (this is the code your BIOS points the cpu to right after the POST test). Now this bit of code knows how to read your filesystem, where it finds your grub.conf and presents you with the menu you see.
OK, I got it (kind of) I guess it will work by simply installing MacOS and adding the extra line to grub. I could need to run grub-install but brobably wont. And even if I will, I know what I can expect (well, ok, kinda...)
Quote:
I am not too sure about this, but then, I don't think anyone is. OS X x86 is cutting edge, so there are no howtos for it. You are venturing into uncharted waters
someone must do it sooner or later (Chris Columbus said the same thing, I guess :-))
Quote:
Yeah, it goes like this: put in the cd, choose you language, and watch it copy files
hummm... I think I can do that if I try really hard... but do I actually have to select and choose my language *manually*? There is no "english only" version? (Just kidding)
OK, I'm up to 71% now (what? I have 5 active downloads and a "so-called" 10Mbps connection that seldom gets more than 120 - 150 Kbps inbound right now Firestarter says that my overall activity is 62,5Kbps)
OK then, while I wait to complete the download I can plan some more details look for some more answers and do some back-ups.
Should I write down some kind of log and post it as an HOWTO?
I answer to myself: Maybe better send it to someone to check spelling & grammar, but OK, I will.

Last edited by Luke771; 01-24-2006 at 10:43 AM.
 
Old 01-24-2006, 12:08 PM   #6
bulliver
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Location: Edmonton AB, Canada
Distribution: Gentoo x86_64; Gentoo PPC; FreeBSD; OS X 10.9.4
Posts: 3,760
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 77
Quote:
Should I write down some kind of log and post it as an HOWTO?
Fer shur man
 
Old 01-25-2006, 01:08 AM   #7
Luke771
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: Sol III, Milky Way
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 43

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
OK, I'm doing it now, I have downloaded the compressed file and it is been uncompressed right now; I checked out the /boot/grub/menu.lst file: the WinXP entry looks like this:
Code:
title		WinXP
root		(hd0,0)
savedefault
makeactive
chainloader	+1
Then I guess the Mac Entry (aka iEntry) would be:
Code:
title		MacOS
root		(hd1,1)
savedefault
makeactive
chainloader	+1
I' m keeping a log of what I've done, so far it reads:

downloaded tiger-x86.tar.bz2
uncompressed to /hdb1/stuff/tiger

...and we'll be back right after this, stay tuned!

Last edited by Luke771; 01-25-2006 at 01:19 AM.
 
Old 01-25-2006, 01:16 AM   #8
Luke771
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: Sol III, Milky Way
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 43

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Houston, we have a problem.
The file that is slowly emerging from the uncompressing of Tiger-x86.tar.bz2 looks like a DVD image, and I haven't got no DVD burner: I'm going to try to mount the image and run from there, but I have not the slightest idea about how big a chance of getting it right I have...
(don't leave that couch, we 'll be right back!)
 
Old 01-25-2006, 07:49 AM   #9
Luke771
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: Sol III, Milky Way
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 43

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Where were we? The part where the decompressed .img file was over 3GB big?
Ok then, from the size of the .img file I figured out (and maybe I was even right) that it must be a DVD image, so I googled for some multi boot install HOWTO, and I found one that looked like a nice step-by-step explanation, starting from the download of the same file I had already downloaded and *not* including any DVD burning, @: http://www.uneasysilence.com/archive/2005/08/3972
Follownig the instructions, I ran:
Code:
dd if=hdb6/stuff/tiger-x86/ tiger-x86-flat.img of=/dev/hdb
I am kinda linux newbie, I learn fairly fast for a not-so-young-anymore guy but I have actually installed my first Linux distro only last november. The end of november, that is. Anyways, I noticed that the line pointed only to hdb without specifyng anything, and that where I did *the* mistake: I should have made some kind of a "mac partition" in the free space, at least a FAT32 one (to be converted later), and tweak the code line to point at it... but I did not.
The HOWTO didn't say a thing about making new partitions, it only talked about free space, and I had free space enough, right after my Ext3 partition (maybe I should have left the free space *before* anything else... whatever). There was actually a line about keeping at least a part of all the existing partitions within the first 7GB of space, but I couldn't figure out how to do that without deleting my file storage partition and keeping only Ext3, Swap and free space (hmmm... maybe next time). Both my file storage and swap partitions were well ouside the first 7GB, maybe that was the problem (and maybe it was not).
On reboot I got Grub Error 17, which I guess could be translated to "dude, where is my partition?",

At this point my HOWTO said to
Quote:
Use boot option -s [on a Linux Live CD], then while in text mode console run
Code:
passwd curtis
passwd deadmoo
passwd root
Quote:
They will have blank default passwords in this mode
Sounded kind of funny to me, but I did that anyway (mistake # 3. or four. or whatever) or at leat I tried to: None of my Linux liveCDs could boot with an -s option.
I tried both
boot -s
and
-s
but neither one worked.
Now I couldn't follow my HOWTO any more, and I had already screwed it up big time anyways, so I booted from Partition Magic and saw that the first hard drive, often called "the master" (sometimes "massa") was still fine because I hadn't even touched it (I had my back-up data on it).
The second drive, the hdb drive that's called "disk1" or "Mr. Slave" (I bought it from Mr. Garrison) was 100% FUBR.
PMagic showed the whole drive in yellow with the text "Error 108" on it (or maybe it was Error 88, or something), It was even labeled as "Bad".
Not cool, dude. Totally not cool.
I tried to make a new partition but the only thing I could get was more error messages about some problem in the partition table; I tried all the possible menus and right clicks I could find in PartitionMagic 8.05 with no luck, so for the first time since I've been using PMagic (about 7 years now) I had to exit with a drive that was still unusable.
I booted from the Ubuntu Install CD and used the Debian Partitioner that comes with it: that did the trick, I told the program to erase disk1 and install the OS there, and when it started copying files, I aborted the installation and booted from PMagic again: I was greeted by a pop-up message about some "big-partition-not-marked-as-extended" kind of problem, do you want to fix that?
Yes.
Reboot.
After that I could see a tiny Ext3 primary active partition at the beginning of the drive, not even one MB in size, and all the rest was one big yellowish never-seen-before kind of a logical partition.
I deleted everything, made a primary 6GB Ext3 active and a logical 2,5GB Swap partition for Linux; the remaining space became a logical FAT32 multi-platform file storage partition, rebooted from Ubuntu Install CD and installed the OS from scratch.
I had my back-up data on another physical drive (disk0 on the same machine) *and* the those data that I absolutely could not afford to lose had also been copied to CD, just in case, so the FUBR partition problem and the new install that followed were kind of annoyng but not real problems at all [FUBR = "F**đ Up Beyond Recognition"].
Next time I try something like that I'm going to get MacOS on a CD in the first place, then install it in a partition at the beginning of the master drive, leaving most of the disk as free space; then I will install Windows in a partition at the beginning of the the slave drive (also leaving lots of free space); then comes the partitioning of the free space on both drives, using Partition Magic: the free space on disk0 will be all FAT32 file storage while the free space on disk1 (hdb-slave) will be splitted between one Linux Ext3 primary and one Swap, one FAT32 file storage, and one 3GB NTFS dedicated windows pagefile partition, in that order and all logicals.
And only then I would run the Linux install.
That's the plan, at least. But I still don't know when I'm going to get started; right now I need to take a break from installing & partitioning, in the meantime I can read something more about multi booting - multi platform systems, I've already googled little more and found dozens of HOWTOs, some of them about Mac-Linux and others about Mac-Win systems, but nothing about triple booting, so far.
Well, my experiment didn't work, but it was worth a try, and I did learn something, so maybe next time it will get better, and it was kinda fun anyway, which is actually the only good reason to do stuff like that, I mean, if I only wanted to surf the web and send e-mail, I could stick with one OS (probably Linux) and be happy that way.
The How-to that I promised is still to be written, but postponed until I actually get my triple-boot system up and running; in the meantime I wrote down this ...paper? This file then, which without doubt can be called a HOW-NOT-TO, and I guess that those are at least as needed as real HOWTOs; it is good to have somone else make mistakes for you, so you can make new ones! (geek fun)
OK, end of chapter 1.

Last edited by Luke771; 01-26-2006 at 06:45 AM.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Triple boot WinXP, Linux and Linux BobNutfield Fedora 2 01-18-2006 02:51 PM
triple boot suse 9.3 with winxp/win me gernish123 Linux - Newbie 5 10-09-2005 09:10 PM
WINXP SP2 / FC 4 dual boot ieduarte73 Linux - Newbie 3 08-26-2005 02:51 PM
Triple boot winxp Suse32 and Suse64 Cell_alive Suse/Novell 5 11-27-2004 05:46 PM
Dual boot WinXP Pro and Linux mandrake 9.0 ShadoWolf Linux - General 9 03-13-2003 01:01 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:10 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration