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stranger_6_7 04-12-2007 12:26 AM

Releasing a product to Open Source Community
 
Hi,

Though this seems to be the general question related to open source. I am unable to find the right answer for my question. We have developed a application using LAMP. We are in the process of releasing this product to the open source community. What are the guidelines,licenses and the rules to release a product to the Open Source Community.


Thanks for the help
stranger.

Hangdog42 04-12-2007 07:37 AM

Well, it is really as simple as picking (or creating) a license and starting to announce it. If you haven't settled on a license, I'd suggest looking at the OSI website as they have a lot of licenses that are good, open source licenses. Of course if you've used any existing open source code in your project, that may dictate what license you use, particularly if the existing code was released under the GPL.

As far as hosting the project, you could look at Sourceforge or Freshmeat. They don't take everything, but it might be worth looking into.

stranger_6_7 04-26-2007 06:16 AM

Hi,

I have few more questions for which i am unable to find the answer. Can you please update me with this.

If i release my application under GPL or Apache or LGPL or BSD . Can i make my application commercial in future when a new release with advanced features added to my application.

Can any end user integrate this tool into their commercial product or application . Which of the above licenses doesn't allow him to do so?

And finally, no end user must be able to commercialize my tool in future. Only i should have the rights to do that. And my brand name and copyrights should exist for ever.

Thanks in Advance for the help
Stranger

Findus 04-26-2007 07:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stranger_6_7
Hi,

I have few more questions for which i am unable to find the answer. Can you please update me with this.

If i release my application under GPL or Apache or LGPL or BSD . Can i make my application commercial in future when a new release with advanced features added to my application.

Can any end user integrate this tool into their commercial product or application . Which of the above licenses doesn't allow him to do so?

And finally, no end user must be able to commercialize my tool in future. Only i should have the rights to do that. And my brand name and copyrights should exist for ever.

Thanks in Advance for the help
Stranger


I don't know much about the details of any of the licenses available , but you could just do what Hangdog42 suggested, and make your own license. Then you would be able to grant or deny whatever rights you wanted.

- Delphi

Hangdog42 04-26-2007 07:59 AM

Just keep in mind that I'm a biologist, not a lawyer, so you should take my answers with a grain of salt........

Quote:

If i release my application under GPL or Apache or LGPL or BSD . Can i make my application commercial in future when a new release with advanced features added to my application.
As long as you "own" all of the code (you haven't incorporated anyone else's work) you certainly can change licenses in the future. What you can't do is make that change retroactive. So if I downloaded your GPL code, and later you moved to a more restrictive commercial license, I would still be able to use the code I originally downloaded under the terms of the GPL. If other people have contributed code to your project, then you either need to get their permission to move to a different license or you have to remove their code.

Quote:

Can any end user integrate this tool into their commercial product or application . Which of the above licenses doesn't allow him to do so?
You definitely want to do some more digging on this, but I believe that none of those licenses prevent another user from incorporating your code into their product. However most of them would prevent them from using your code and not releasing it to the public. If you want to prevent people from ever using your code in their products, you really aren't making an open source product and shouldn't use an open source license.

That said, there are some real abominations out there that pretend to be open source licenses, but really aren't. The one I'm most familiar with is the SugarCRM license. That essentially ties the code license to their trademarks and prevents users from releasing modified code.

Quote:

And finally, no end user must be able to commercialize my tool in future. Only i should have the rights to do that.
Check further into the OSI site I linked to earlier. I've seen some licenses that do this, but I don't think any of the ones you listed will. I think the Trolltech license for the QT widgets are a good example. Those are free for non-profit use, but commercialization requires a license fee to Trolltech.

If keeping control of your code is a major concern for you, I wouldn't use the BSD license. That pretty much releases code for anyone to use as they see fit with almost no obligation. It is probably the least restrictive of open source licenses.

Quote:

And my brand name and copyrights should exist for ever.
A completely separate issue from the code license and no open source license I'm aware of deals with these.

stranger_6_7 04-27-2007 01:41 AM

Hi Hangdog,

These were the answers i am looking for.

Thanks for the information and for the answers you have given to my every question.
This is enough for me to decide and consider the license i have to use for my application.I would like to disturb you whenever i have any queries in open source license.

Thanks for the help

Regards
stranger.


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