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Old 04-01-2010, 03:18 AM   #1
maxx223
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real temperature from amd k10 cores


I am using the standalone k10temp temperature sensor but it doesn't give the actual temperature of the cpu, just some "bogus" temp value that isn't very useful.

Does anyone know how you can calculate the real temperature from this reading?

Thanks
 
Old 04-01-2010, 03:45 AM   #2
business_kid
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Core Temperature is best viewed as resistances to ambient. Take from the cpu datasheet the core power dissapation (different from power consumption), and you can also get the core --> exterior thermal resistance in terms of degrees C per watt usually. Your heatsink, and thermal paste will also have a thermal resistance specified in degrees C per watt. Then do the math: If we're dissapating 10 watts at the core, and all resistances are 2 degrees C per watt, and the heatsink is at 50 degrees, that might be

50 +20 +20 +20 = 110
 
Old 04-02-2010, 01:59 PM   #3
maxx223
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Thanks for elaborating me on this issue. I still wonder how the bios can know the real temp and why the temp module can't use the same method that bios uses to retrieve this value?
 
Old 04-03-2010, 04:33 AM   #4
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You can't, you can only approximate as the core center is effectively another layer away from the outside of the core. Use 110 degrees as a disaster temperature. Bios that issue critical notices at 105 are pretty good. The actual core center could be close to 150 at that stage. Normal running is up to 70 degrees, overheated running is up to 105, and above that soon enough comes core meltdown.

If you have an interest in this, chase websites of chip manufacturers for application notes on temperature.
 
  


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