LinuxQuestions.org
LinuxAnswers - the LQ Linux tutorial section.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General
User Name
Password
Linux - General This Linux forum is for general Linux questions and discussion.
If it is Linux Related and doesn't seem to fit in any other forum then this is the place.

Notices



Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 04-16-2011, 11:01 AM   #1
themanwhowas
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Distribution: CentOS 5, BT5, Slackware 12.0
Posts: 207

Rep: Reputation: 29
Read only OS


Hey guys.

If i wanted my Linux install to act as non persistent, as in I boot from the hard drive as normal but any changes i make won't save, is it as simple as changing the filesystems to 'r' in fstab? Would I have to have some partitions rw, /var perhaps? I imagine read only /var would throw me tons of errors. Any other partitions I need?

Thanks
 
Old 04-16-2011, 11:30 AM   #2
Snark1994
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2010
Location: Wales, UK
Distribution: Arch
Posts: 1,632
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 345Reputation: 345Reputation: 345Reputation: 345
Quote:
Originally Posted by themanwhowas View Post
I boot from the hard drive as normal but any changes i make won't save
I think the point here is that you won't be able to make changes... IMO a better way would be to have a script that "restores" the computer's state from a separate backup partition when you boot it up
 
Old 04-16-2011, 01:17 PM   #3
themanwhowas
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Distribution: CentOS 5, BT5, Slackware 12.0
Posts: 207

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 29
This is a good point, but i was thinking more like a live cd. You can install stuff, create files etc. Perhaps i could somehow unpack a live cd iso to a hard drive?
 
Old 04-16-2011, 05:19 PM   #4
elliott678
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2005
Location: North Carolina
Distribution: Arch
Posts: 977

Rep: Reputation: 72
Look into Tinycore, the base system loads into RAM from the initrd. Any changes won't survive a reboot unless you use the backup tool.
 
Old 04-16-2011, 10:46 PM   #5
themanwhowas
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Distribution: CentOS 5, BT5, Slackware 12.0
Posts: 207

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 29
Thanks, I'll give it a look see
 
Old 04-16-2011, 11:01 PM   #6
anomie
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2004
Location: Texas
Distribution: RHEL, Scientific Linux, Debian, Fedora, Lubuntu, FreeBSD
Posts: 3,930
Blog Entries: 5

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
In addition to TinyCore, for some variety check out Slax, Slitaz, and DSL. But - yes - if you want to start from a clean slate upon reboot, a live environment (probably CD) is a good way to go.
 
Old 04-17-2011, 04:53 PM   #7
jefro
Guru
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Posts: 12,093

Rep: Reputation: 1521Reputation: 1521Reputation: 1521Reputation: 1521Reputation: 1521Reputation: 1521Reputation: 1521Reputation: 1521Reputation: 1521Reputation: 1521Reputation: 1521
Every live cd/dvd could be usually made to do what you want. That is to use the image of the live cd and save it to your hard drive. The problem is that the normal way is set to root and allows read/write to local disks. You could fix that.

Simply using grub4dos would allow many iso's to be run directly. Almost every how to at pendrivelinux would work too for a hard drive as it does for a usb.

Last edited by jefro; 04-18-2011 at 06:46 PM.
 
Old 04-17-2011, 07:06 PM   #8
XavierP
Moderator
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Location: Kent, England
Distribution: Lubuntu
Posts: 19,176
Blog Entries: 4

Rep: Reputation: 430Reputation: 430Reputation: 430Reputation: 430Reputation: 430
http://kiosk.mozdev.org/
http://www.internetling.com/2008/04/...-distribution/
http://www.ehartwell.com/InfoDabble/...efox_and_Linux
The links above discuss creating a kiosk setup with Linux - this gives you the ability to restore settings on reboot and is designed for internet cafes and libraries. It may be an easier way to do this.

I found these links by putting "Linux kiosk" (minus the quotes) into Google.
 
Old 04-18-2011, 09:19 PM   #9
themanwhowas
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Distribution: CentOS 5, BT5, Slackware 12.0
Posts: 207

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 29
Thanks guys
 
Old 04-18-2011, 09:38 PM   #10
enine
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Distribution: Slackware 14.1
Posts: 821
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 91
I did a read only setup a few years ago. Just kept looking through the init scripts until I found the place where it remounted root as r/w and commented that out.
I found there was a few things, mostly in var that needed to write so I did a search on how to create a ram drive, set that up early in the init and then would link the files there and touch them in the init so they were created in the ramdisk each time. was actually pretty easy.
 
  


Reply

Tags
filesystem, persistent, read only


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Program to read total read/write cycles for compact flash card timetraveler Linux - Hardware 0 05-06-2010 10:49 PM
silo read error on block <number>... results in a short read peterlowrie Linux - Hardware 0 02-07-2010 08:39 PM
Raid disk problem : Attempt to read block from filesystem resulted in short read ElmPie Linux - General 5 08-26-2008 06:21 AM
kernel panic unable to mount root (yes ive read/read other posts) dmx9595 Linux - General 4 01-17-2004 06:07 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:58 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration