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Old 06-02-2013, 10:08 PM   #16
DavidLee1A
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My pleasure.
 
Old 06-03-2013, 03:02 AM   #17
mariose
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Thanks boet!
 
Old 06-03-2013, 03:32 AM   #18
pan64
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I would say an important point is missing: you should be interested. You will never know linux, it is nonsense, You will know parts of the system, you will be familiar with some tools, techniques (and so on...). You need to understand how they work, how to use them ... But without real interest and willing to know it and master it you will never be an expert.
 
Old 06-03-2013, 11:45 AM   #19
just.srad
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Thanks Habitual, for your useful tips on the Google search as well as the recommendation of zim-wiki and other utilities.
 
Old 06-03-2013, 11:49 AM   #20
just.srad
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Thanks onebuck for your tips too... :-)
 
Old 06-03-2013, 09:07 PM   #21
shane25119
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I've been using Linux for about 10 years (8 of them as my primary operating system). In that time, I've learned by a lot of repetition, if I do it enough times it just kind of sticks. Otherwise, I've gotten pretty good at searching through various help forums- you'll find the ones that are best for you. I tend to like this one best, it's written in a very "newbie friendly" way.

In my day job, I'm an academic and I play with some fancy stats (mostly in R, some Stata) and have recently started programming to manipulate data. I find the best way to learn that is to find a tutorial, download the tutorial data and work through the examples while typing all the code (no copy and paste) and documenting it in my own words. It's a great reference and forces me to learn it.

I'm also a big fan of saving bash scripts of particularly difficult command line problems- that way I can go back and rerun it when I need to do it again six months down the line.

Hope this helps.
 
Old 06-05-2013, 10:10 PM   #22
just.srad
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If we need to explore more than one subject of interest , let say Shell scripting, Python , Network security and SSH. (This is my example, and you may have your own curriculum of research/study)

Here we have four subjects. Would you all suggest to complete a topic first before going for the next. Or we could have a go on all the 4 topics? ( I would like to know what's individual take. )

If we go for the 4 topics at a time.. how would you plan to tackle the challenges along the way. ?

I believe there would be stop/pause along the study journey, or you might hit a stubborn hurdle. How would you decide to skip it and ignore it altogether? Or you might try to find a way to encounter it.

Any good strategy in studying of any subject of interest?



Thanks once again for anyone's valuable input.
 
Old 06-08-2013, 12:41 AM   #23
chrism01
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If you need a quick n dirty soln right now for some job, the just learn what you can from eg google or LQ and then update when time permits.

Ideally you'd want to do one thing at a time, but that can get tedious.

You could reserve say x hrs per week per subject; enough time per subject to get somewhere, short enough to allow time for the next.
You may need to prioritise to get a needed soln.

Note also that there will be some overlap eg N/W security & ssh go hand-in-hand; its a bash env so you need basics regardless of eg learning Python.
Similarly if you want to automate ssh as opposed to just manual logins...
 
Old 06-10-2013, 06:52 PM   #24
just.srad
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Thanks Chris, your advise sound great especially on " You could reserve say x hrs per week per subject; enough time per subject to get somewhere, short enough to allow time for the next. You may need to prioritise to get a needed soln."

What i really need right now is the motivation and planning.

Based on my past, even though i plan i didn't carry it out to the full..( i think it's due to lack of faith)

Plan and Do is like a quantum leap. (Leap of Faith).

Anyway, appreciate for all the kind folks here for their time in giving your suggestion and input.

Justin
 
Old 06-11-2013, 05:50 AM   #25
chrism01
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Best thing is to find a project you want/need to do and learn whatever you need to, to do it.
If you use Linux at work, that's easy

At home is different; try reading various 'Q & A's at LQ and go deeper for something that gets your attention.
 
Old 06-15-2013, 09:43 PM   #26
just.srad
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Thanks Chris =)


There is a book i would like to share here. It;s related to learning.

The title of the book is " The Art of Learning". (By: Josh Waitzkin)

It's really an inspirational and i read it like a spiritual text.

It is written in detail on the author's journey in learning path.

Last edited by just.srad; 06-16-2013 at 06:20 AM.
 
  


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