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Old 08-12-2004, 12:44 PM   #1
digitalgravy
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mkdir command


I read the man page, but I wanted to know the proper syntax for making multiple directories and some with sub directories.

ie, a calendar setup
Calendar
>2002
>2003
>2004
->Jan
->Feb
->Mar
->Apr
->May
->June
->Jul
etc.

Thanks in advance.
 
Old 08-12-2004, 12:48 PM   #2
david_ross
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You just use:
mkdir -p Calander/2004/Jan Calander/2004/Feb Calander/2004/Mar

and so on...
 
Old 08-12-2004, 12:57 PM   #3
digitalgravy
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I saw online somewhere that there was something like this:

mkdir -p calendar{2000 2001 2002 2003}

But I cant find it. It might have been with [] or maybe {}.

Do you know about this at all?

Thanks
 
Old 08-12-2004, 12:59 PM   #4
Dark_Helmet
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And here's a neat little shell expansion trick (although it is kinda ugly):

mkdir -p Calendar/200{2,3,4}/{Jan,Feb,Mar,Apr,May,Jun,Jul,Aug,Sep,Oct,Nov,Dec}
 
Old 08-12-2004, 01:00 PM   #5
digitalgravy
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That is what I was looking for!

Thanks both of you!
 
Old 08-12-2004, 01:03 PM   #6
Dark_Helmet
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Hehehe... responded while I was typing. What happens using the curly braces is that the shell expands the text so there will be one item for each value separated by a comma. So, with your example (replacing the spaces with commas and adding a forward slash):

mkdir -p calendar/{2000,2001,2002,2003}

The shell expands that to:

mkdir -p calendar/2000 calendar/2001 calendar/2002 calendar/2003

By repeating the curly braces, you "double up" so to speak.

mkdir -p calendar/{2000,2001}/{Jan,Feb,Mar}

becomes:

mkdir -p calendar/2000/Jan calendar/2000/Feb calendar/2000/Mar calendar/2001/Jan calendar/2001/Feb calendar/2001/Mar
 
  


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