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Old 05-12-2005, 10:43 PM   #1
Cinematography
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making a backup of user / program settings


My last copy of Linux died. I had to install a new copy of Linux so I could get my files from the old copy. I would like to format and start fresh now. Before I do that, I would like to save the user/program settings from my old copy of Linux.

Is there an EASY way I can backup user/program settings?

Last edited by Cinematography; 05-13-2005 at 08:24 PM.
 
Old 05-12-2005, 10:57 PM   #2
Matir
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Moving them from distro to distro is not the easiest task as files have a tendency to be in slightly different locations on different systems. However, you'd want to keep your entire home directory (perhaps make a preserving-style tarball of the thing) and probably the files in /etc. These would at least give you a place to store settings to refer to later.
 
Old 05-12-2005, 10:58 PM   #3
btmiller
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In general, global configuration files go in the /etc directory. Individual users' configurations go in files or directory prefixed by a . (dot) in their home directory. You should back up the appropriate configs for /etc and of course copy over user home dirs you will need.
 
Old 05-12-2005, 11:01 PM   #4
mrcheeks
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Basically you just want to do a :
Code:
tar jcvf home-backup.tar.bz2 ~/.*
and a zip of global configuration files in /etc that you might need.
 
Old 05-12-2005, 11:22 PM   #5
Cinematography
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Quote:
Originally posted by Matir
Moving them from distro to distro is not the easiest task as files have a tendency to be in slightly different locations on different systems.
How about if I'm moving from Mandrake to Mandrake?

Quote:
Originally posted by btmiller
In general, global configuration files go in the /etc directory. Individual users' configurations go in files or directory prefixed by a . (dot) in their home directory. You should back up the appropriate configs for /etc and of course copy over user home dirs you will need.
Are these directories hidden? I can't seem to find them.

Quote:
Originally posted by mrcheeks
Basically you just want to do a :
Code:
tar jcvf home-backup.tar.bz2 ~/.*
and a zip of global configuration files in /etc that you might need.
Beautiful command line. What if I wanted to just backup the files in my home directory and not the files on my desktop? I have a huge video editing directory on my desktop that I would like to backup later.

Thanks a lot for the replies, folks.
 
Old 05-12-2005, 11:28 PM   #6
Matir
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Directories and files beginning with a '.' are indeed hidden. Those in your home directory are generally configuration, preference, startup, and history files. I would add 'p' to the tar command line to preserve permissions, though!
 
Old 05-13-2005, 03:41 AM   #7
Cinematography
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Quote:
Originally posted by Matir
Directories and files beginning with a '.' are indeed hidden. Those in your home directory are generally configuration, preference, startup, and history files. I would add 'p' to the tar command line to preserve permissions, though!
Is there a way I could see these files so I can see what I'm doing with them? Or backup just my program/os settings?

Last edited by Cinematography; 05-13-2005 at 06:07 AM.
 
Old 05-13-2005, 12:21 PM   #8
Cinematography
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*bump* ^_^
 
Old 05-13-2005, 08:01 PM   #9
Cinematography
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Old 05-13-2005, 11:10 PM   #10
Matir
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ls -A in the console will show the hidden files as well.
 
Old 05-14-2005, 12:01 AM   #11
Cinematography
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Quote:
Originally posted by Matir
ls -A in the console will show the hidden files as well.
[tony@localhost tony]$ -A
bash: -A: command not found

 
Old 05-14-2005, 12:11 AM   #12
mrcheeks
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is
Code:
ls -A
not
Code:
-A
 
Old 05-14-2005, 12:12 AM   #13
Matir
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Sorry for the lack of clarity.
 
Old 05-14-2005, 12:13 AM   #14
mrcheeks
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by the way if you are using gnome or kde, just use the view or display menu of your file manager to display hidden files.
 
Old 05-14-2005, 12:33 AM   #15
Cinematography
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Quote:
Originally posted by mrcheeks
is
Code:
ls -A
not
Code:
-A
Oh good god... After 2 days of hell I'm finally making some progress. I can now see the files I want to backup. Thank you guys very much.

And now.... for my last question.... How do I backup JUST those program setting directories into a tar file?
 
  


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