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Ztcoracat 08-25-2012 02:33 AM

Major Directory Trees
 
:)Hi:
I have done my Debian Distro reading but still have questions-

I understand that there are 3 major directories and 3 sets of sub-directories; containing index. One; Binary; (.gz & bz2)
Since the binary pkg's residise in the top level of the pool directory I'm confused about this.

After looking at all the different Linux trees I found on a Google page I was still uncertain and only one of them made sense to me. Sorry I haven't been able to copy/paste; just purchased this Sony & don't know how yet-(an ordeal all of it's own;lol)

I read about the sub directories that are meant for source pkg's and the other sub directories intended for the installation systems index files.

Does each distribution have the same number of index files?

Would these be on the far right of the tree (if I were standing on the roots) or the far left?

If this pool directory is at the top of the tree (where the modules are) what files are in between the first branch at the bottom and the last branch at the top?

Any information would be much obliged-

pixellany 08-25-2012 06:00 AM

Quote:

I understand that there are 3 major directories and 3 sets of sub-directories; containing index. One; Binary; (.gz & bz2)
I don't understand this---can you show us where you found it?
Quote:

Sorry I haven't been able to copy/paste
It's almost always ctrl-C for copy and ctrl-V for paste**.

To get us all on the same page, please open a terminal and enter "ls /". Post the results here.**

For reference, this is the output of "ls /" on my system:
Code:

[mherring@herring_desk ~]$ ls /
bin  dev  home  lib64      media  opt  root  sbin  sys  usr
boot  etc  lib  lost+found  mnt    proc  run  srv  tmp  var

"/" is the root of the filesystem so, in my case, there are 20 top-level directories



**In the typical virtual terminal, it's ctrl-shift-copy and ctrl-shift-paste. Or just select the text, right-click, and select copy or paste.

Ztcoracat 08-25-2012 11:51 AM

I'm writing to you from my new laptop and don not have a Linux distro on it.
I've only had this Sony Vaio for 2 days. It has Windows 7 on it and I don't know how to open a terminal in Windows.

I had Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Linux on my desktop for the past 3 years. I installed Debian 2 weeks ago on my desktop.

My Desktop PC has Debian Squeeze on it.

This is the Debiann page that I read and found "6.8 What are all those directories inside dists/stable/main?"

http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/de...html#s-dirtree

Thank you for telling me about Ctrl+C and Ctrl+v-
And; Thank you for showing me the ls; / output on your system.

I picked up a large poster board and started to create a large tree with paper and clue. At the end of each branch I glued small pieces of paper to resemble files. I started this poster board to help myself understand the Linux tree. So far I only have the root user at the bottom of the tree. This is the tree that I am duplicating on my poster board and it's website. It's the only tree that made any sense to me- On the Google page I'm referring to the all black tree.

https://www.google.com/search?q=linu...z06AGmjoGICg&s

I'm not were my Desktop is but I can post the terminal results you asked me for later after 6p.m.

Ztcoracat 08-25-2012 05:50 PM

Here's what the output of my terminal is for ls /

Code:

bin  etc        lib    lost+found  opt  sbin    sys  var
boot  home        lib32  media      proc  selinux  tmp  vmlinuz
dev  initrd.img  lib64  mnt        root  srv      usr
ztcoracat@mock:~$

I see mine is slightly different than yours; looks like I have more to learn-

pixellany 08-25-2012 06:14 PM

Quote:

This is the Debiann page that I read and found "6.8 What are all those directories inside dists/stable/main?"

http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/de...html#s-dirtree
That is information for the Debian web site-----not for the Linux file system.

I would not worry too much about differences between your file system and someone else's---just get used to how your system does things, and then you can branch out.

for more info, do a Google search using "linux file system".

Randicus Draco Albus 08-25-2012 06:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ztcoracat (Post 4763749)
I understand that there are 3 major directories and 3 sets of sub-directories; containing index. One; Binary; (.gz & bz2)
Since the binary pkg's residise in the top level of the pool directory I'm confused about this.

The first link is information about the Debian FTP archives. It explains how the package repositories are organised. It has nothing to do with the Linux file system. It is more information than you need to know.
Learning about the structure of the Linux file system on the other hand, is very useful.

Edit
pixellany posted before I did, making my post somewhat redundant.

Ztcoracat 08-25-2012 07:28 PM

I'm on my way; going to Google to find:
Code:

" Linux file system"
Thank You; for helping me to get things straight.

Ztcoracat 08-25-2012 07:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Randicus Draco Albus (Post 4764287)
The first link is information about the Debian FTP archives. It explains how the package repositories are organised. It has nothing to do with the Linux file system. It is more information than you need to know.
Learning about the structure of the Linux file system on the other hand, is very useful.

Edit
pixellany posted before I did, making my post somewhat redundant.


Sometimes redundancy is a good thing. The act of repeating something over and over again is IMO a good teacher.
It helps one to get better at what they do or in this case what I'm trying to learn.

I had to fabricate a porcelain fused to metal crown 20 times or more before I could permanently cement it onto a person's natural tooth structure.
Now,I can (theoretically speaking)fabricate a crown with my eyes closed.


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