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sudo_su 02-09-2013 08:32 AM

Linux Study scenario
 
Dear members,

I have seen my friends studying CCIE, they have downloaded pdf which are released almost few times a month, in that pdf there are scenarios given and then a ticket for it to solve problem.

I found it very useful because thats the best way to learn via trouble shooting and for persons who dont have linux environment in their workplace, its the best way to learn.

I want to know if there are some documents like such available for linux, that will really help learning linux via trouble shooting.

thanks you

Thor_2.0 02-09-2013 10:49 AM

Quote:

I want to know if there are some documents like such available for linux, that will really help learning linux via trouble shooting.
Yup, there is: experience :D believe me, stuff will go south for the winter...

What I can give as advice is: get one or more old(er) PC's (second hand for example) install something like Fedora. I learned the most from that one, it's bleeding edge and (honestly) it's a great system to...beta test on. Stuff (upon release) is sometimes still in beta stage...you'll learn a heap with that one. Next, Arch Linux. It's about as close as you can get to freeBSD, if not more...
Arch demands a lot of learning curve, but once you've tasted that one, you're sold... :)

And, then there's...this forum, stuffed with helpfull folks that are beyond knowledgable (me NOT included, I still do most of the asking here :) )

Thor

rabirk 02-09-2013 06:27 PM

It would be great to have a more formal system for studying Linux, but I haven't found one. I think the reason is that Linux comes in so many forms and is used in so many ways, from Android phones to supercomputers. There are of course many books in print and online about Linux, usually focused on certain desktop uses or server distributions. So I think Thor_2.0 is probably right. Pick one of the base distributions, like Arch, Debian, or Slackware, and work through the online documentation to get it to do what you want it to do. The troubleshooting will possibly come naturally. This comes from somebody who has been using Linux for less than a year.

Thor_2.0 02-10-2013 05:56 AM

Quote:

The troubleshooting will possibly come naturally
Oh, believe it , it will, and whenever you hit a wall, we'll be here to help...an other great learning tool: this forum :)

chrism01 02-11-2013 02:11 AM

I would recommend bookmarking www.linuxtopia.org; a lot(!) of free to read books/manuals.
You're going to need to refer to them....

kooru 02-11-2013 02:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Thor_2.0 (Post 4887666)
Yup, there is: experience :D believe me, stuff will go south for the winter...

What I can give as advice is: get one or more old(er) PC's (second hand for example) install something like Fedora. I learned the most from that one, it's bleeding edge and (honestly) it's a great system to...beta test on. Stuff (upon release) is sometimes still in beta stage...you'll learn a heap with that one. Next, Arch Linux. It's about as close as you can get to freeBSD, if not more...
Arch demands a lot of learning curve, but once you've tasted that one, you're sold... :)

And, then there's...this forum, stuffed with helpfull folks that are beyond knowledgable (me NOT included, I still do most of the asking here :) )

Thor

i quote all, only i add you can use Slackware to learn :)
Here some documentations to start: http://www.tldp.org/


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