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Old 12-22-2006, 01:32 PM   #1
asgarcymed
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Linux - How to add a new user with the same root/super-user's privileges?


In Linux (Unix), a normal (limited) user is a miserable that can do nothing - everything is denied! I tried to use only the root/super-user account, but my distro obligates me to have at least a user other than root. I know that it is possible to add a new user with the same root/super-user's privileges, but I do not know how. Can you please help me to get rid of normal (limited) user's annoyances?
Thanks.
 
Old 12-22-2006, 01:34 PM   #2
XavierP
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There is a very very good reason that the normal user account is limited - security. Why not create the normal user and then look at either using "su" when you need root access or using "sudo"?
 
Old 12-22-2006, 01:41 PM   #3
reddazz
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In addition to "su" and "sudo", you can use kdesu or gnomesu/gksu to run apps as root whilst logged in as a normal user.
 
Old 12-22-2006, 02:18 PM   #4
MOS JEFF-INITELY
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by adding a normal user to the root wheel group it will make it like super user.
try this:

open /etc/passwd
change:
user:x:123:324::/home/user
to
user:x:0:0::/home/user

however .. once again this is not considered safe for security purpose .. Im assuming your representing with a Windows machine and feel you should have more users with root privilege .. this is a little more dangerous in Linux/Unix/AIX/Solaris than it is in Windows.

hope this helps,
 
Old 12-22-2006, 02:32 PM   #5
Tinkster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asgarcymed
In Linux (Unix), a normal (limited) user is a miserable that can do nothing - everything is denied! I tried to use only the root/super-user account, but my distro obligates me to have at least a user other than root. I know that it is possible to add a new user with the same root/super-user's privileges, but I do not know how. Can you please help me to get rid of normal (limited) user's annoyances?
Thanks.
If you have "annoyances" as a normal user you're using
your machine in the wrong way. What kind of day-to-day
activities do you need root level privileges for?

The distinction between a normal user and root is there
for various (very good) reasons, most of them around security
and protection of the installation.

Also: which distro are you using?


Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 12-22-2006, 02:33 PM   #6
phil.d.g
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Quote:
by adding a normal user to the root wheel group it will make it like super user.
try this:

open /etc/passwd
change:
user:x:123:324::/home/user
to
user:x:0:0::/home/user
That essentially makes user an alias for root, the system will consider root and user to be the same user. On most Linux systems adding a user to the wheel group doesn't really make any difference.
sudo is the way to go.

Furthermore you only need root privileges to do administrative tasks, a regular user account is adequate for normal use.
 
Old 12-22-2006, 05:28 PM   #7
Emerson
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Security is not a joke.
Novice users do not know why running any OS as administrator/root is a stupid idea and think they can ignore this requirement.
I remember on some forum someone complained his Linux box was rootkitted and hijacked in an hour. He did not understand why creating user test with password test and adding this user to the wheel group is a bad idea ...

Last edited by Emerson; 12-22-2006 at 05:40 PM.
 
Old 12-23-2006, 03:30 AM   #8
asgarcymed
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Smile Thank you guys!

Thank you a lot! You helped me much! I am using Mandriva Linux (by far my favorite distro) and I need to install new rpm's, see the system logs (/var/log/) and other administrative tasks. I am no much more than a newbie in Linux/unix, yet; but I am an advanced user in Windows and I "fell in love" with Linux! Linux is much more fun and powerful! I want to become a master of Linux, so I am hardly studying it.
"su" is annoying; "sudo" is much better; editing /etc/passwd file to set user's UID and GID to 0 is the most easy way, however more dangerous... Thank you a lot! Best regards!
 
Old 12-23-2006, 07:45 PM   #9
jiml8
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The single most important reason why Windows installations are so commonly torn up is because Windows encourages users to log in as Administrators. When they do this, they (and any bad software they inadvertently load on their computers) has full and unrestricted access to the system, well beyond what a user needs routinely.

Thing is, becoming an Administrator in Windows when you need to is such a pain that no one ever bothers.

On my Windows systems, my kids are users only. And I never have problems with torn up and infested systems. The kids do indeed catch the viruses, but those things can't do anything because they don't have access rights. I log on as an administrator all the time, but I know what I am doing and pay attention.

A very major advantage of Linux (indeed, any *nix) is that it encourages you to log in as a User, and makes it possible to become root when you need to, only when you need to, and only for so long as you need to. The result is that Linux systems are less prone to infestation because any bad program that does get loaded won't have access rights that would let it do bad things.

Windows encourages a very bad habit; Linux encourages a very good habit. Do it the Linux way. Log in as a user and only become root when you need to.
 
  


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