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Old 05-26-2010, 09:06 PM   #1
Rob83
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Linux geared towards lay men


I'm a Linux newbie. I took a class on Linux at my college which is how I ended up here. The one thing that sticks out most to me about Linux OS's is how much potential they have if they were more geared towards everyday people.

For example using installation processes similar to Windows or Os X. Most people don't have any clue about RPM (I'm not too familiar with it myself).
I find that the way Puppy is set up (which is what I use along with Windows) in a way that most people could easily use it given a decent instruction manual or guided tour.

I think the Linux community as a whole (regardless of which distro) should come together with a unified approach that appeals to everyday users with no real technical background.

Thoughts????
 
Old 05-26-2010, 09:12 PM   #2
lumak
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Linux already is user friendly. I started with Fedora and found the installation process painless and intuitive. The most annoying part about the install process was trying to understand why it wanted to partition my harddrive a certain way.

The problem is when people are familiar with windows and try and take a windows look at linux. It would be akin to taking a windows look at mac. you just can do it and understand everything. Taking a fresh look is all anybody needs to do.

The people using gnu/Linux are already working in unison within the individual projects, working together on one OS mantra would ruin everything and hinder creativity.

to a windows user an rpm is no different than those worthless msi or exe files that install a program. Renaming it to another extension wouldn't solve anything. Think about it. If you were new to computers, would rpm, msi, exe, zip, tgz, abc, efa, gha, gnu look any different to you? At least with rpm you end up with a uniform install method that the OS knows about and where all the files went. With msi and exe, it's up to the program to decide if it wants to tell windows where it installed everything.

I suppose binding the F1 key in the major OS distros to some master help file would solve the problem for interested users... at least that's Microsoft's approach to customer service.

Last edited by lumak; 05-26-2010 at 09:17 PM.
 
Old 05-26-2010, 09:25 PM   #3
brucehinrichs
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Have a look at this. Gives one some perspective.
 
Old 05-27-2010, 05:09 AM   #4
alli_yas
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Quote:

The problem is when people are familiar with windows and try and take a windows look at linux. It would be akin to taking a windows look at mac. you just can do it and understand everything. Taking a fresh look is all anybody needs to do.
Very true - when I started using Linux, I suffered this same problem.

The thing about Linux is that if you try to take the Windows view on it, you definitely will not be leveraging its power.

Think of Windows as a car where you're the passenger; versus Linux where you're the driver of that car - with Linux, you are in complete control of your OS at varying levels from a high level down to the lowest level.

Yes there are distros that are "geared" toward lay men (typical examples would be Ubuntu and Mint - even Fedora is heading that way) - but the thing is; yes it may be easier to use these distro's; but you'll still be using them like a Windows user; and in that way you wont be gaining the maximum that you can from the OS.
 
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Old 05-27-2010, 05:27 AM   #5
catkin
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It's like going to live in another country. At first you look for the things you are familiar with and don't find some of them. You miss the things you used to be able to do and now can't. If you are open and explore the ways of the new country you gradually find new ways of doing old things and new possibilities, things you couldn't do in your old country. The art of adapting is learning new habits. After a while, if you return to the old country, you find some of its ways inconvenient at best and annoying at worst.
 
Old 05-27-2010, 06:18 AM   #6
MTK358
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http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...9/#post3972803
 
Old 05-27-2010, 07:53 AM   #7
pixellany
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For people who have never installed or setup any OS, my guess is that--on average--Linux can be installed and configured in about 1/2 the time it takes for Windows.

With a fast internet connection I can have a complete** Arch system running in less than an hour. The last time I did an equivalent Windows XP setup, it took 3 hours.


**"complete" means internet, wireless, browser, e-mail, and office suite.
 
Old 05-27-2010, 06:04 PM   #8
vigi
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One of the best features of linux is being able to isolate your /home partition and reload or change your OS without loosing and data or customization. If you reload or change windows, you generaly have to sit there reloading programmes and setting it back to how to like it. This can take longer than loading any gnu-linux.
 
Old 05-28-2010, 09:05 AM   #9
Rob83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lumak View Post
Linux already is user friendly. I started with Fedora and found the installation process painless and intuitive. The most annoying part about the install process was trying to understand why it wanted to partition my harddrive a certain way.

The problem is when people are familiar with windows and try and take a windows look at linux. It would be akin to taking a windows look at mac. you just can do it and understand everything. Taking a fresh look is all anybody needs to do.

The people using gnu/Linux are already working in unison within the individual projects, working together on one OS mantra would ruin everything and hinder creativity.

to a windows user an rpm is no different than those worthless msi or exe files that install a program. Renaming it to another extension wouldn't solve anything. Think about it. If you were new to computers, would rpm, msi, exe, zip, tgz, abc, efa, gha, gnu look any different to you? At least with rpm you end up with a uniform install method that the OS knows about and where all the files went. With msi and exe, it's up to the program to decide if it wants to tell windows where it installed everything.

I suppose binding the F1 key in the major OS distros to some master help file would solve the problem for interested users... at least that's Microsoft's approach to customer service.

From a stand point of user interface, yes Linux is user friendly. The RPM's that require you to type in commands to install are not. To the
average person it's far more easier to just point and click.

If the average user was new to computers then yes, rpm would be just as easy to use if they weren't so use to the msi and exe.
 
Old 05-28-2010, 09:10 AM   #10
Rob83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany View Post
For people who have never installed or setup any OS, my guess is that--on average--Linux can be installed and configured in about 1/2 the time it takes for Windows.

With a fast internet connection I can have a complete** Arch system running in less than an hour. The last time I did an equivalent Windows XP setup, it took 3 hours.


**"complete" means internet, wireless, browser, e-mail, and office suite.
O yes for sure. The laptop I'm using right now came with Vista but with the hardware I have on it, Vista was just too slow. So I got rid of it completely. I installed Xp first but had to find drivers (even the ethernet controller). With Puppy Linux I was able to install in less than half the time with Xp, and I didn't need to find any drivers. Everything just worked and worked well.
 
Old 05-28-2010, 09:30 AM   #11
brucehinrichs
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Quote:
From a stand point of user interface, yes Linux is user friendly. The RPM's that require you to type in commands to install are not. To the
average person it's far more easier to just point and click.

If the average user was new to computers then yes, rpm would be just as easy to use if they weren't so use to the msi and exe.
Did you read the link I gave you?

Windoze was just as difficult and unfamiliar when you first started it.
 
Old 05-28-2010, 09:35 AM   #12
snowpine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob83 View Post
The RPM's that require you to type in commands to install are not. To the
average person it's far more easier to just point and click.
Can't you double-click the RPM? (just like Windows)
Have you tried the Add/Remove Software application?
 
Old 05-29-2010, 12:29 AM   #13
Rob83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brucehinrichs View Post
Did you read the link I gave you?

Windoze was just as difficult and unfamiliar when you first started it.
My history with Windows is this : The first version I used was 3.11 back when I was a kid. I kept that version because I didn't have a huge need for software way back when. Around 2000, 2001 I got a new desktop with Windows Me. Going to college the first time around, I used Windows 2000 and later Xp.

We all know that the user interface for Windows 95, 98, Me, and 2000 is almost exactly the same. It's always been point - click - and you are done. The menus, and other GUI components were largely the same. Xp had more to offer than the previous versions but you still had a start menu, my computer, etc. And of course Vista ,and 7 look largely the same too. You still have start, my computer, control panel, etc.

I never ever remembered having a hard time using Windows, even as a kid using a desktop for the first time. With Linux you have similarities but soo many flavors (which is one of the things that draws me to it)
 
Old 05-29-2010, 12:33 AM   #14
Rob83
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Originally Posted by snowpine View Post
Can't you double-click the RPM? (just like Windows)
Have you tried the Add/Remove Software application?
No I haven't tried that. But I will.
 
Old 05-29-2010, 07:16 AM   #15
MTK358
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob83 View Post
We all know that the user interface for Windows 95, 98, Me, and 2000 is almost exactly the same. It's always been point - click - and you are done. The menus, and other GUI components were largely the same. Xp had more to offer than the previous versions but you still had a start menu, my computer, etc. And of course Vista ,and 7 look largely the same too. You still have start, my computer, control panel, etc.
The thing is that point-and-click is good for many things, but quite terrible for others.
 
  


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