LinuxQuestions.org

LinuxQuestions.org (/questions/)
-   Linux - General (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-general-1/)
-   -   Linux Administrator Job (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-general-1/linux-administrator-job-681044/)

latinmusic74 11-04-2008 09:53 AM

Linux Administrator Job
 
I would like to know:

What other technologies does a LINUX Administrator needs to learn in a regular job?


What does a LINUX Administrator do in a regular day?

"I found this job description:

5+ years Linux System administration and engineering experience DNS fundamentals, BIND Network fundamentals, including diagnostics with Unix tools RedHat Linux ES 3, 4, and 5 Working knowledge of complex web hosting configuration components, including firewalls, load balancers, web and database servers Well versed in Apache web server, PHP, MySQL VMWare - ability to deploy, support, and diagnose real issues for a production environment Experience with JBoss a plus NIS, NFS, BIND, Sendmail SNMP, TFTP, Iptables, Quagga, Syslog, Snort, Splunk Proficiency with fiber channel switches and SANs
Additional Qualifications for Linux Administrators:
Familiarity with Cisco CatOS and IOS Excellent written and verbal communication skills Demonstrated analytical/problem solving ability Time management and organizational skills Ability and desire to learn new skills quickly"

Companies want the candidate to also know other technologies like PHP, MYSQL, SAN, JBOSS........

trickykid 11-04-2008 10:24 AM

Linux Administrators usually handle the administration of services provided to clients, employees, etc.

I suppose the main things needed to know and the basics are the OS itself, services like DNS, MTA, HTTP and Database knowledge.

You'll usually want to be proficient with some type of scripting or programming language. You can usually get away with knowing shell scripting and or perl/python/ruby and so on.

You need a solid understanding of Hardware which also include storage devices, either its a SAN, NAS with iSCSI, fiber.

Networking is a huge plus to have, from the basics to Cisco technology along with security knowledge.

Other applications or services like JBoss, Tomcat and such in which a companies products might run on is helpful as most administrators will support and monitor the applications, etc.

Backups is good knowledge to have along with a good disaster recovery plan.

VMware and other virtualization technologies is good to have as well.


My typical day is me monitoring systems, checking backup statuses, making sure the applications are working, installation of new servers and or redeploying new/existing applications on servers, checking security integrity, etc.

I support RHEL systems running Oracle databases with Websphere as our main component that our product runs on in a clustered environment. The backups I manage use Veritas Netbackup Enterprise using a small SAN to perform disk based backups over iSCSI. We IBM blade servers along with some Sun machines all running 64 bit RHEL. We also have a few systems running within VMware ESX.

Right now I just got done with some Websphere training and will try to dive into the process of automating our Websphere installs and deployments as we manually configure these now, which take too long. The scripting required for this is going to enable me to learn Python as the scripting language used on the back side for Websphere is Jython.

Maybe that gives you a quick overview of a daily Linux administrators life.

Ranguvar 11-04-2008 10:39 AM

Helpful, even for basic Linux desktop know-how: http://www.draxeman.com/sag.html

chrism01 11-04-2008 08:20 PM

A little light reading :)
http://www.linuxtopia.org/online_boo...ion/index.html

nenupharvn 05-03-2010 09:49 PM

Administrative job descriptions
 
These are many positions of Administrative department. It can include:
1. Administrative clerk
2. Administrative assistant
3. Administrative executive
4. Administrative coordinator
5. Administrative specialist
6. Administrative director
7. Administrative officer
8. Administrative supervisor
9. Administrative associate
10. Administrative manager
11. Administrative assistant manager

Based on the above positions can help you to set up Administrative dept, design job descriptions, Administrative interview questions.

I hope that this comment can help some info for our communities.

Rgs

nenupharvn

Dogs 05-03-2010 11:04 PM

Trickykid, what do you know of the expectations placed on new *nix administrators?

new = no previous experience in system/network administration

As in, what must a new administrator know before he could approach the position professionally?



Consider, for example, these requirements pulled from a job listing in my area.. --


The items in bold are ambiguous to me.


Job Description:

Providing technical support for Level I-III issues via helpdesk and the telephone.

Monitoring servers for stability
and taking both proactive and reactive measures to correct and prevent issues.

Providing fellow system administrators and support representatives with technical support and guidance.

Assisting clients in transferring accounts to our servers.

1.Installing, configuring, and maintaining services such as Apache, MySQL, and Exim across thousands of servers.
Required Skills:

-Excellent written and verbal communication skills in the English language.

-Ability to work well with a team in a fast paced, constantly changed environment and follow instructions from supervisors and senior colleagues.

-Outstanding customer service skills and a dedication to the customer service experience.

-Dependable to be at work during assigned shifts and to complete work as expected.

-Advanced knowledge of cPanel/WHM control panel.

-Advanced knowledge of the Linux operating system.

-Knowledge of bash and Perl shell scripting.

-Advanced knowledge of Exim.

-Advanced knowledge of Apache.

-Flexible schedule.

-Understanding of PHP and HTML.






If I can read and understand, and for the most part recite from memory, the scripts associated with bootup (runlevels and so forth), does that mean I have knowledge of BASH?

If I can read and understand, but not necessarily write without the assistance of a syntax book, PHP scripts, does that mean I have an understanding of PHP?

If I can install 2 dozen different versions of Linux and update/configure them, but I admittedly lack much experience with tools such as iptables and nmap, does that mean I have advanced knowledge of the *nix operating system?

If I use cPanel for managing a web server and SQL, and know pretty much everything about the features, but not about the code that cPanel is, does that mean I have advanced knowledge of cPanel?



Is this an accurate assessment of the calls to the administrator that takes place during these I-leveled issues?

I = "Hey, admin, I'm so so so sorry to bother you, I was just trying to access my e-mail because --- long and detailed story here and then I forgot my password.. What do I do?"

II "ADMIN! ROUTER DIED!"

III "ADMIN!!!! WTF!!!!"


What does he mean by stability? I can check logs, interrogate a process, etc etc.. Is that "monitoring", and irregular stats/etc is instability?



What exactly is an account transfer? User accounts? Bank accounts? Contract accounts?

cheltz 05-04-2010 01:29 PM

Linux Admin Posting
 
I have been working with Unix for over 17 years and have had a bunch of jobs. Truth is those ads are "usually" posted by someone who has no idea what it says. They are regurgitating information some IT person copy and pasted from somewhere. "Usually" very little thought is put into those ads. If you qualify for some subset inside those qualifications, go for it. You will find when you get an interview the actual job has little to do with what the ads says.

Dogs 05-04-2010 01:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cheltz (Post 3957075)
I have been working with Unix for over 17 years and have had a bunch of jobs. Truth is those ads are "usually" posted by someone who has no idea what it says. They are regurgitating information some IT person copy and pasted from somewhere. "Usually" very little thought is put into those ads. If you qualify for some subset inside those qualifications, go for it. You will find when you get an interview the actual job has little to do with what the ads says.


How common is it for the guy that does the interview to also know what the ad says?

What about the guy that looks at the resume? (assuming the interview and resume reviewer are not the same person)


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:46 PM.