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Old 07-24-2013, 11:06 AM   #1
WysDieDeur
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I would like to know more on the Inner Workings of Linux and its subsystems


Good day

I am quite new in the world of Linux as a user and/or administrator but I am more inclined towards learning the technical inner workings of it.

Do you perhaps know of a great source/sources for technical papers/documentation explaining how some parts of Linux works while focusing on more detailed descriptions and hopefully how that relates to the actual source code while showing code snippets to enforce the descriptions. A more fully technical paper would be very much appreciated.

The parts that I am currently interested in is:

1. Bootstrapping and Bootloaders (GRUB, LILO).
3. Filesystems preferably Ext4 with a focus on how it fits together and then journaling
2. Basic Kernel to maybe more advanced Kernel interaction and workings of the core excluding the more outlying (if I can call it like that) systems like networking, etc

I have searched so much during the last few weeks but always end up with only brief description of what is what but never really a very detailed description on how things work and hardly ever along with source code. Being new to this all is most probably also hindering how I filter the information to make it relevant.

I understand that the ask is big but whatever you know of will surely be of help.

Thank you so much
 
Old 07-24-2013, 11:26 AM   #2
Z038
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For Bootstrapping and Bootloaders, there is a good introductory overview here:

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-linuxboot/

See the Resources section at the bottom of that article. You'll find, for example, another introductory discussion about LILO and GRUB (legacy, not GRUB2):

http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/li...oad/index.html

While both of the above are designated as "Introductory" by IBM, they go into more detail than most similar articles you'll find on the web. These may lead you to other relevant material.

Many may quibble with me on this, but in general, I find IBM documentation to be superior to most else.
 
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Old 07-24-2013, 11:33 AM   #3
brianL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WysDieDeur View Post
2. Basic Kernel to maybe more advanced Kernel interaction and workings of the core excluding the more outlying (if I can call it like that) systems like networking, etc
There's quite a lot of documentation that comes with the kernel source. Might be useful to you. Download it and have a look.
https://www.kernel.org/
 
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Old 07-24-2013, 12:32 PM   #4
DavidMcCann
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You could always try Linux From Scratch. By the time you've made your own, you'll really know how it works.
http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/
 
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Old 07-25-2013, 04:20 AM   #5
kooru
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Hi and welcome to LQ!
Have you already seen here?
 
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Old 07-25-2013, 07:30 AM   #6
syg00
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1. Bootloaders (the non proprietary ones anyway) are independent of operating systems. Best pursued from the project themselves.
2. Likewise filesystems are nowadays outside of the kernel - some older examples aside. Even in the case of ext[234], Ted Ts'o maintains it as a separate project - he's always seemed approachable when I've attended his presentations.
3. The kernel is *huge* - I doubt anyone apart from Linus and Andrew Morton have a comfortable grasp of all/most of it. You need to zero in to a very small portion that is of interest. And you'll get as frustrated as hell trying to get a handle on that. You'll need to zero in even more when you find out what's involved.
kernelnewbies is an excellent resource to get you going.
The code develops at an amazing rate - the papers/books that do source code analysis quickly go out of date. this is a great book, but is years old now.

Good luck, and I hope you have persistence and a thick skin.
 
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Old 07-25-2013, 07:39 AM   #7
Firerat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidMcCann View Post
You could always try Linux From Scratch. By the time you've made your own, you'll really know how it works.
http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/
Just wanted to second this..
If you want to learn how a Linux/GNU system slots together LFS is a very good way to start
 
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Old 07-25-2013, 11:42 PM   #8
jamison20000e
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GNU\

Last edited by jamison20000e; 07-26-2013 at 11:22 AM. Reason: still between the lines ;)
 
Old 07-26-2013, 10:33 AM   #9
onebuck
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Member Response

Hi,

Welcome to LQ!

We have a lot of resources here at LQ, look at the top menu bar. Tutorials, Articles and the search function can help you.

Plus;
Quote:
Just a few more links to aid you to gaining some understanding. Sure some may seem beyond a newbie but you must start somewhere;



Linux Documentation Project
Rute Tutorial & Exposition
Linux Command Guide
Utimate Linux Newbie Guide
LinuxSelfHelp
Bash Beginners Guide
Bash Reference Manual
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Linux Home Networking



The above links and others can be found at '
Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!
Hope this helps!
 
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Old 07-26-2013, 05:02 PM   #10
szboardstretcher
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Onebuck's answer is great.

I would like to add, that for me, jumping in and having to do something is usually the driving force behind me having to learn something. So, with that in mind, I would say:

Get a server operating system (Centos, Ubuntu, Scientific Linux)
Install it in a virtual machine
Set it up to sync its time from pool.ntp.org
Disable selinux
Set up iptables to allow port 80
Setup and install Apache httpd, php, and mysql

Once you can serve up a webpage:
Install and configure varnish
Set up SNMP
Make some bash backup scripts to backup your machine
Turn the machine into a dnsmasq or powerDNS server

Once you have done all these things, you will have a good solid, basic understanding of how to setup networking, firewalls, use the shell, configuration, and debugging from log files.
 
Old 07-28-2013, 03:38 PM   #11
WysDieDeur
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Thank you to all for your input. I really appreciate it/
 
  


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