LinuxQuestions.org

LinuxQuestions.org (/questions/)
-   Linux - General (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-general-1/)
-   -   how to repair external USB harddisk formatted as ntfs (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-general-1/how-to-repair-external-usb-harddisk-formatted-as-ntfs-4175452092/)

rupeshforu 02-28-2013 09:24 AM

how to repair external USB harddisk formatted as ntfs
 
Sir recently I have bought external USB harddisk of size one TB and it was previously formatted as ntfs.I have made all my backup of size 750GB. I am unable to read from this drive on windows8 and I am able to read from this drive on opensuse12.2 OS. I have tried a lot to make this harddisk working like running chkdsk in elevated mode, using partition recovery tools etc., but none worked.

Are there any tools or softwares in Linux to fix this problem without losing of data.


Regards,
Rupesh.

padeen 02-28-2013 08:14 PM

Can you still read it in opensuse? If so, then the data is safe.

When you say "it was previously formatted as ntfs", are you saying that it is no longer formatted as ntfs? If so, what filesystem is it formatted as now?

bloody 02-28-2013 10:40 PM

If you can read the partition from your Linux system, you can always copy all content to a local harddisk and then re-format the partition, in case there was something wrong with the partition.

You might wanna try "ntfsfix /dev/sdXN" to force Windows to do a full file system check next time you boot into Windows.

Maybe you should still backup the files from that partition before you proceed with any action that might apply changes to the fs which could result in some kind of data loss.

chrism01 02-28-2013 11:11 PM

It sounds like its been re-formatted using a Linux filesystem like ext3 or ext4.
Mount it on Suse and run
Code:

df -Th
If you can read it from Suse, do NOT try to 'fix' it.
If it is using a Linux fs, then MS will not be able to read it without the proper driver (not std on MS).

bloody 02-28-2013 11:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chrism01 (Post 4902114)
If you can read it from Suse, do NOT try to 'fix' it.

My above post was referring to ntfsfix which will do nothing but marking an NTFS file system as "dirty", so Windows will do a file system check during boot.

If the partition is not NTFS, ntfsfix will spew a few error messages but eventually abort without any action taken.

rupeshforu 03-01-2013 12:04 AM

Sir when I buy it I have checked filesystem type it was ntfs and now also when I run the command fdisk -l it is showing filesystem type as ntfs. I have done chkdsk in Windows8 elevated mode still I am unable to access the drive on Windows8 but I am able to access it on suse.

rupeshforu 03-01-2013 12:11 AM

I can't copy all the 750GB to other because I don't have space so please suggest how to make it readable from Windows OS`s.

bloody 03-01-2013 05:46 AM

fdisk -l only shows the partition type, but not which filesystem it really contains. The partition type is a numeric id that is added to the partition. fdisk is reading this and displays it in the output.

I suggest to run the "blkid" command (as root) in a shell which will output the eventual name of the filesystem ("TYPE=xxxx"), amongst other infos. It will tell if the file system really is ntfs, or something different.

If the file system is not ntfs, you will have no other option than to borrow a harddisk so you can backup all files before you change the filesystem, i.e., use mkntfs to format the partition with ntfs, or use Windows8 for that task.

Randicus Draco Albus 03-01-2013 06:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rupeshforu (Post 4902158)
I can't copy all the 750GB to other because I don't have space

If you need to, you can burn those files onto a DVD or a couple CDs.

Quote:

Sir recently I have bought external USB harddisk of size one TB and it was previously formatted as ntfs.I have made all my backup of size 750GB.
Did you do anything else?
Did you simply copy files to the drive or did you tinker with the drive first?
Did the drive work with Windows before you put your files on it?

bloody 03-01-2013 06:49 AM

750 GB onto "a" DVD? That's at least 160 DVDs (or "a couple" of 1072 CDs)..

lleb 03-01-2013 10:57 AM

copy/paste your results from df -Th from your Linux with that external HDD plugged in and mounted. that will help us help you further.

If it is ext2/3 there are some tools that you can install on the windows computer to gain access to the data, but if it truly is formatted NTFS and windows can not read it, sorry then windows is just being windows and there will not be much you can do.

purevw 03-01-2013 01:14 PM

If you try to read a Windows disk that was not a disk on your current computer, there may be a problem with "ownership". You may be able to have Windows take ownership of the filesystem on the disk, depending on what version of 8 you are running. Linux can read it because fuse ignores many of the file permissions.

In your Windows file manager, right click on the drive, and look for "security". If your version of Windows has that feature, you can find the permissions and ownership information and change it.

Randicus Draco Albus 03-01-2013 04:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bloody (Post 4902362)
750 GB onto "a" DVD? That's at least 160 DVDs (or "a couple" of 1072 CDs)..

:doh:
I saw GB and thought MB. My bad. Ignore me and carry on.

But given the OP's posting history both here and at DebianForumNet, asking exactly what he has done was the main purpose of the post. Was anything done to the drive before or after storing every package in the repositories on it?

iHateInventNames 03-01-2013 10:13 PM

try testdisk program

rupeshforu 03-02-2013 05:08 AM

I am providing the output of blkid below
linux-k4gi:~ # blkid /dev/sdc1
/dev/sdc1: LABEL="Elements" UUID="1ADC8962DC893951" TYPE="ntfs"
linux-k4gi:~ #

I am providing the output of fdisk -l below
linux-k4gi:~ # fdisk -l /dev/sdc

Disk /dev/sdc: 1000.2 GB, 1000202043392 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121600 cylinders, total 1953519616 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x0002846e

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdc1 * 2048 1953519615 976758784 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
linux-k4gi:~ #

I am providing the output of df -Th below
linux-k4gi:~ # df -Th
Filesystem Type Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
rootfs rootfs 217G 121G 96G 56% /
devtmpfs devtmpfs 3.7G 60K 3.7G 1% /dev
tmpfs tmpfs 3.7G 1.0M 3.7G 1% /dev/shm
tmpfs tmpfs 3.7G 760K 3.7G 1% /run
/dev/sdb9 ext3 217G 121G 96G 56% /
/dev/sdb8 ext3 20G 173M 19G 1% /home
tmpfs tmpfs 3.7G 760K 3.7G 1% /var/lock
tmpfs tmpfs 3.7G 760K 3.7G 1% /var/run
tmpfs tmpfs 3.7G 0 3.7G 0% /media
/dev/sdc1 fuseblk 932G 702G 230G 76% /run/media/root/Elements
/dev/sr0 iso9660 4.4G 4.4G 0 100% /run/media/root/openSUSE-DVD-x86_640167
linux-k4gi:~ #

On examining suggest what to do now.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:49 AM.