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-   -   how to hide a file using file permissions in linux without using dot (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-general-1/how-to-hide-a-file-using-file-permissions-in-linux-without-using-dot-713332/)

davender84 03-21-2009 05:55 AM

how to hide a file using file permissions in linux without using dot
 
i want to hide a file using file permissions pls suggest me how can i do this
thanks in adv.

unSpawn 03-21-2009 06:30 AM

Next time it would be efficient to post what you have tried yourself. As unprivileged user you will be able to hide files from other users using access permissions by changing the "other" and "group" bits. For example running 'chmod 0400 ~/somefile' as unprivileged user sets the file permissions to readable for you but not other unprivileged users ...but you can not use discretionary access permissions to hide a file from root. (If the files contents are worth it you could opt for file encryption instead. While GnuPG is one of the most secure and compatible forms, you could also use something simple like
Code:

openssl enc -e -bf -in ~/someFileName -out ~/someOtherFileName
which works on all platforms having access to OpenSSL.)

sundialsvcs 03-21-2009 08:37 AM

The only way that I know of to "hide" a particular file is to prefix the name with a period.

The entire content of a directory can be concealed from view with permissions, applied to the directory.

davender84 03-23-2009 02:49 AM

thanks
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by unSpawn (Post 3483010)
Next time it would be efficient to post what you have tried yourself. As unprivileged user you will be able to hide files from other users using access permissions by changing the "other" and "group" bits. For example running 'chmod 0400 ~/somefile' as unprivileged user sets the file permissions to readable for you but not other unprivileged users ...but you can not use discretionary access permissions to hide a file from root. (If the files contents are worth it you could opt for file encryption instead. While GnuPG is one of the most secure and compatible forms, you could also use something simple like
Code:

openssl enc -e -bf -in ~/someFileName -out ~/someOtherFileName
which works on all platforms having access to OpenSSL.)


thanks for your advice and support

dv502 03-26-2009 12:13 AM

@ davender84

You can move your sensitive files to a USB flash drive.


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