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Old 05-31-2002, 11:24 AM   #91
wartstew
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Location: Albuquerque, NM USA
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While on this subject, I'm currently at work on this VIA Apollo based machine with a 40 Gig IBM Deskstar (IDE) in it and here are the benchmarks I get:

/dev/hda:
Timing buffer-cache reads: 128 MB in 0.94 seconds =136.17 MB/sec
Timing buffered disk reads: 64 MB in 1.65 seconds = 38.79 MB/sec

Although this 850Mhz Duron based system seems to really scream on Slackware-8, this benchmark seems too high to be real! This is using the 2.2.19 kernel recompiled with all the VIA specific stuff enabled. I also have all the usual hdparm optimizations (DMA, 32 bit, mul.. etc.) enabled.

So what is going on here?

I have some 7200 RPM ultrawide drives at home on an LSI controller and get buffered disk reads in the 17.x mb/s range.

I think the buffered reads indicate the limits of the drive, not the OS or other hardware, cache reads show the full performance potential of the rest of the hardware (and OS).

Last edited by wartstew; 05-31-2002 at 12:03 PM.
 
Old 05-31-2002, 11:33 AM   #92
wartstew
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Quote:
Originally posted by keef_keef
Laptop, Redhat 6.2, Toshiba MK1214GAP 12GB drive

64 MB is 15.46 seconds = 4.14 MB/sec !

Although toshiba say's it has a 66.7MB's UDMA transfer rate
Laptop drives are always slow. This is do to the less physical sectors per track on the smaller diameter disks, as well as the much slower RPM of the disks (usually 4200 RPM). The slow RPM is to conserve power I guess.
 
Old 05-31-2002, 11:57 AM   #93
wartstew
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Re: got it...

Quote:
Originally posted by bako
For some strange reason it does work when I rename the symlink to S01hdspeedup

Anyone??? can I only create Sxx scripts in the rcx.d dir's and why is that??? (I was thinking the letter S and the numbers were to set the startup sequence like S01scriptname is started before S99scriptname and something like T12scriptname would be started after S99scriptname)
You are on the right track. "S" in front is for "Startup". "K" is for "Kill" (I guess), which is for shutdown.

In the earlier case, you were tweaking the drive only as you were shutting down.

After the SysV type init script figures out wheather or not to run the "S" or "K" scripts, it does sort the files in alphabetical order as you stated.
 
Old 07-01-2002, 07:35 PM   #94
safrout
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mine is

1)for the drive which has on it linux os

it is segate 13 gega

/dev/hdb:
Timing buffered disk reads: 64 MB in 3.43 seconds = 18.66 MB/sec


2) for the drive having windows on it

it is samsung 13 gega also

/dev/hda:
Timing buffered disk reads: 64 MB in 2.93 seconds = 21.84 MB/sec
 
Old 07-01-2002, 07:38 PM   #95
safrout
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try this

everyone who is bored with slow hard drives

can try these steps and see if it will do what it should do :

/===================================\
| Speeding Up Your Linux Partitions |
| By Craig Keough |
| With a few notes by R a v e N |
| http://blacksun.box.sk |
\===================================/

So, you installed LINUX and the speed is not what you heard it was. Am I correct ?
The default installation of any distribution is designed to work on a broad range of computer setups and therefore has minimal optimizations (Same as Windows9x by the way).
Freshly-installed boxes come with a default kernel and default settings, which are supposed to be as compatible as possible. By optimizing your settings, you can do wonders. For example: RedHat 6.2 comes with a 660k kernel, but you can easily reduce it down to somewhere around 500k, even less. This should speed up your performance greatly.
But today we're about to do something completely different.

We will begin by tweaking your hard drive for the fastest performance, so if you are using
KDE, then exit to the console. ( because of the nature of these tweaks your computer could become unstable resulting in corrupted or lost data, therefore it should be done without X-Windows running)

if you are logged in as a normal user, type su at the command prompt then enter the password.

The command we will be using is : hdparm

You can get a list of all the commands for hdparm by typing it by itself and hitting enter,

A further explanation of these commands can be obtained by typing man hdparm

The next step will be to determine what your hard drive is called, hda, hdb, etc.
If you already know GREAT otherwise :
type dmesg this will display all the information that was displayed during boot.

If you have 1 hard drive then more than likely it is called: hda
If you have 2 hard drives then more than likely it is called: hdb

Lets assume it is hda.

Now type: hdparm -I /dev/hda
This will read all sorts of information directly from the drive, telling us what it can support.
Before you use a particular tweak, make sure you check this information to make sure your drive supports it.

Do a speed test by typing: hdparm -t /dev/hda
Repeat this a few times and get a general idea of the speeds and write them down
so when we are finished you can compare the results.

I got the results of : 4.31 MB/s

Next Type in: hdparm /dev/hda
This output tells you what the defaults are set at, you will notice that I/O
support reads 16-bit, its probably not using DMA and the unmask irq is probably 0 (off),
along with multicount being disabled.
Most newer hard drives can use these settings, so we will be turning them on.

type in: hdparm -c3 -m16 /dev/hda
This will turn on multireads and turn on the 32-bit flag w/sync

Now do your speed test again, what a great improvement !!!

You may want to stop here because the next few tweaks could make your computer lock up
if they are not supported.

We need to turn DMA on by typing: hdparm -d1 /dev/hda
We can also turn on multiword DMA2 by typing hdparm -d1 -X34 /dev/hda

Set the unmask irq bit to on by typing: hdparm -u1 /dev/hda
Do: man hdparm to understand what this does.


And the last setting will be to set the PIO mode of your drive, so look at the inforamtion
from doing hdparm -I /dev/hda and see which pio modes it supports.
Type in hdparm -p4 /dev/hda
Replace 4 with the highest number supported by your drive.


Run: hdparm -t /dev/hda
At this point I got a reading of 19.43 MB/s
Which is a drastic improvement.

Now we dont want to type in these parameters every time we reboot, so we will add them to a startup script.

Change to /etc/rc.d
I simply added them to the end of the rc.local script, because It is the last script that
is executed and any fscking is done before that point.

You can combine all these settings on one line or you can put each on a separate line
if you want to make it easier to understand. Also make sure you put in a comment
saying what these settings are for so you can find them easier if you need to change them.

Example: hdparm -c3 -m16 -d1 -X34 -u1 -p4 -kK /dev/hda

PLEASE NOTE: do these things at your own risk, i am not responsible.



==============
if any one have more about this , please post it here. and if any one can tell au about the technecal stuff like: DMA and IRQ ..etc. please do that ...
guys, when i did this in my old kernel 2.4.5 it didnt work. i was asking if any of you have any recources about modefing and configuring new kernels on you your box, you know what to do....
 
Old 07-01-2002, 08:39 PM   #96
DavidPhillips
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Or you can use the file /etc/sysconfig/harddisks on some systems
 
Old 07-02-2002, 09:35 PM   #97
doublefailure
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[root@eugene hdparm-5.2]# hdparm -t /dev/hda

/dev/hda:
Timing buffered disk reads: 64 MB in 5.20 seconds = 12.31 MB/sec
[root@eugene hdparm-5.2]# hdparm -t /dev/hda

/dev/hda:
Timing buffered disk reads: 64 MB in 4.53 seconds = 14.13 MB/sec
[root@eugene hdparm-5.2]# hdparm -t /dev/hda

/dev/hda:
Timing buffered disk reads: 64 MB in 5.26 seconds = 12.17 MB/sec


how do i know which hard drive i have?
and what driver i'm using??

i have a vaio laptop
thank you...
 
Old 07-02-2002, 09:37 PM   #98
doublefailure
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[root@eugene hdparm-5.2]# hdparm -c 1 -d 1 -k 1 /dev/hda

/dev/hda:
setting 32-bit IO_support flag to 1
setting using_dma to 1 (on)
setting keep_settings to 1 (on)
IO_support = 1 (32-bit)
using_dma = 1 (on)
keepsettings = 1 (on)
[root@eugene hdparm-5.2]# hdparm -t /dev/hda

/dev/hda:
Timing buffered disk reads: 64 MB in 4.10 seconds = 15.61 MB/sec
[root@eugene hdparm-5.2]# hdparm -t /dev/hda

/dev/hda:
Timing buffered disk reads: 64 MB in 4.08 seconds = 15.69 MB/sec
[root@eugene hdparm-5.2]# hdparm -t /dev/hda

/dev/hda:
Timing buffered disk reads: 64 MB in 4.00 seconds = 16.00 MB/sec
[root@eugene hdparm-5.2]# hdparm -t /dev/hda

/dev/hda:
Timing buffered disk reads: 64 MB in 4.17 seconds = 15.35 MB/sec
[root@eugene hdparm-5.2]#
 
Old 07-03-2002, 12:52 PM   #99
Sifvion
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/dev/hda:
Timing buffered disk reads: 64 MB in 1.62 seconds = 39.51 MB/sec
 
Old 07-03-2002, 10:45 PM   #100
Poorman
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64mb in 20.67 seconds = 3.10 mb/sec

maxtor 40gig 7200rpm

Poorman
 
Old 07-03-2002, 11:01 PM   #101
jct842
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tried several times for speed and best is:
/dev/hda:
Timing buffered disk reads: 64 MB in 1.89 seconds = 33.86 MB/sec
[root@localhost tux]# :
am new to linux as of about nov of 2001, after reading other posts i am going to leave mine alone.
have a western ata100 7200rpm 20gig drive.
it aint broke bad enough for me to mess it up anymore
than it is!
 
Old 08-02-2002, 06:07 PM   #102
kendo
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Maxtor
(5400 rpm)
EIDE
Timing buffered disk reads: 64MB in 2.33 seconds =27.47 MB/sec
 
Old 08-03-2002, 12:37 AM   #103
A-dummy
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SAMSUNG IDE 20GB

Timing buffered disk reads: 64 MB in 9.01 seconds = 7.10 MB/sec

This is after i made changes suggested by safrout & David....thanks guys....before that it was
3.43MB/sec.....
 
Old 08-15-2002, 11:28 AM   #104
luigi9999
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ON MY SERVER
Timing buffered disk reads: 64 MB in 4.21 seconds = 15.20 MB/sec

(Maxtor 40gb 7200 ATA/100 ... but the system only supports DMA66)

ON MY WORKSTATION
Timing buffered disk reads: 64 MB in 1.67 seconds = 38.32 MB/sec

(same drive, but on a newer mainboard that does ATA/100)

i know that ATA/100 is SUPPOSED to be able to transfer at 100mb/sec... but i figure that this is dependant on how fast the drive can supply data - usually limited by the rotational speed of the drive... 7200rpm in this case. (am i right here, or am i missing something?)

from what i've seen, 5400rpm ata/100 typically gets you around 30mb/sec maxed out, and 7200 ups that by - suprise! - 1/3, to almost 40mb/sec. if anyone gets higher than that on this class of drive - MESSAGE ME!!

hard disk is usually the biggest bottleneck in a system, so IT'S WORTH YOUR ATTENTION!!

 
Old 08-15-2002, 02:16 PM   #105
HellBound
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/dev/hda5:
Timing buffered disk reads: 64 MB in 2.26 seconds = 28.32 MB/sec

I have a Samsung 40gig 7200RPM IDE HD
 
  


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