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phantombudgie 09-29-2009 11:27 AM

Duplicate kernel entries of Ubuntu 9.04 in GRUB loader
 
The GRUB loader displays a list of available systems:

Ubuntu 9.04, kernel 2.6.28-15 generic
Ubuntu 9.04, kernel 2.6.28-15 generic (recovery mode)
Ubuntu 9.04, kernel 2.6.28-14 generic
Ubuntu 9.04, kernel 2.6.28-14 generic (recovery mode)
Ubuntu 9.04, kernel 2.6.28-11 generic
Ubuntu 9.04, kernel 2.6.28-11 generic (recovery mode)
Ubuntu 9.04, memtest 86+
Other operating systems:
Windows Vista (loader)


I assume that the kernel 2.6.28-11 and 2.6.28-14 entries are redundant, but how do I remove them? They appeared after Ubuntu updated itself.

{BBI}Nexus{BBI} 09-29-2009 12:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by phantombudgie (Post 3700646)
The GRUB loader displays a list of available systems:

Ubuntu 9.04, kernel 2.6.28-15 generic
Ubuntu 9.04, kernel 2.6.28-15 generic (recovery mode)
Ubuntu 9.04, kernel 2.6.28-14 generic
Ubuntu 9.04, kernel 2.6.28-14 generic (recovery mode)
Ubuntu 9.04, kernel 2.6.28-11 generic
Ubuntu 9.04, kernel 2.6.28-11 generic (recovery mode)
Ubuntu 9.04, memtest 86+
Other operating systems:
Windows Vista (loader)


I assume that the kernel 2.6.28-11 and 2.6.28-14 entries are redundant, but how do I remove them? They appeared after Ubuntu updated itself.

You need to edit your /boot/grub/menu.lst file.

Look for an entry like this:
Code:

## controls how many kernels should be put into the menu.lst
## only counts the first occurence of a kernel, not the
## alternative kernel options
## e.g. howmany=all
##      howmany=7
# howmany=all

Remove the # from the last line and replace the number 7 with the number of entries you would like to see.

i.e. howmany=1 to see only one entry etc.

You need to be root in order to edit the file. Before editing the file, make a backup.

To edit the file, start a terminal and type:
Code:

sudo gedit /boot/grub/menu.lst
press enter input your root password, the file will then open and you can begin editing.

AlucardZero 09-29-2009 02:45 PM

Quote:

You need to edit your /boot/grub/menu.lst file.
Um, yes but no.

The 2.6.28-11 and 2.6.28-14 entries are for backup if 2.6.28-15 doesn't work. You can hide them by editing menu.lst, but that won't remove them from the system. Open up Synaptic and remove some of the old kernels.

phantombudgie 10-01-2009 07:21 PM

I tried both. The only things I could find in Synaptic relating to the old kernels were a couple of header files, which I removed. Rebooting still showed the same options.

Editing the menu.lst file to howmany=1 also did not change anything after rebooting. Maybe I needed to change a couple of other options in there?

I then edited the file further, deleting the entries at the end of the file containing information about the old kernels. This seems to have done the trick and my computer still works, so I assume I haven't done anything too silly!

Thanks for pointing me in the right direction.


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