LinuxQuestions.org

LinuxQuestions.org (/questions/)
-   Linux - General (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-general-1/)
-   -   Can Linux write to NTFS windows partitions? (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-general-1/can-linux-write-to-ntfs-windows-partitions-66337/)

Stevetgn 06-18-2003 08:17 AM

Can Linux write to NTFS windows partitions?
 
I have a dual boot Windows XP / Linux Mandrake 9.1 system
Linux won't write or copy files (it will read ok) to my /mnt/win_d2/ ("E" Drive on second Hard drive in Windows). Will linux not write to NTFS partition or do I need to setup some permisions. If so how

Thanks in advance

Steve

contrasutra 06-18-2003 09:05 AM

If you write to NTFS in linux, you will most likely kill your partition. Its possible to do with a kernel recompile, but not recommended.


Short answer: No, you can't write to it, only read.

Stevetgn 06-18-2003 09:40 AM

what about FAT32?

acid_kewpie 06-18-2003 09:42 AM

fat32 is a trivial file system, it can be safely written to no problem.

Stevetgn 06-18-2003 10:54 AM

In windows I converted it to FAT32 but now in Linux I can't see any of my files or folders in that drive...why? they're still there in windows!

trickykid 06-18-2003 11:01 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by Stevetgn
In windows I converted it to FAT32 but now in Linux I can't see any of my files or folders in that drive...why? they're still there in windows!
Well if you were loading it using the NTFS you need to remount the drive and tell it to mount it as a vfat filesystem.

Check your fstab if you have it mounted automatically at bootup and change it to suit your needs.

slightcrazed 06-18-2003 11:05 AM

I know I have seen cases where the partition table is changed, and what was hda5 becomes hda7 or something like that. I had a similar situation a while back (after a Win2k reinstall - somehow I don't seem to miss those AT ALL), and I just had to play around with fstab until I found the correct partition.

slight

trickykid 06-18-2003 11:12 AM

Quote:

Originally posted by slightcrazed
I know I have seen cases where the partition table is changed, and what was hda5 becomes hda7 or something like that. I had a similar situation a while back (after a Win2k reinstall - somehow I don't seem to miss those AT ALL), and I just had to play around with fstab until I found the correct partition.

slight

Why play around with a guessing game when you can just do a : fdisk -l to find the listed partition that way.... ;)

slightcrazed 06-18-2003 01:26 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by trickykid
Why play around with a guessing game when you can just do a : fdisk -l to find the listed partition that way.... ;)
Cause I was a :newbie: at the time, and I am probably only a hair above :newbie: now. :p :p

*writes down fdisk -l in small linux command reference notebook*

thanks trickykid.

:D

slight

Killalotta 01-30-2004 09:02 AM

Running linux again for the first time in 4 or 5 years. Wanted a decent file server. I.e. not WinBlows. ;)

Anyways, I'm quite interested in getting r/w access on an NTFS volume. (There's no friggin' way that I'm going to copy that 50+G of data back and forth...)

I've found a couple of interesting web sites. Anybody have experience with either of the following two projects?

http://www.jankratochvil.net/project/captive/
http://linux-ntfs.sourceforge.net/status.html

Please let me know. Thanks.

huibert.alblas 02-04-2004 03:04 AM

It is possible to write to NTFS
 
Hi,

if you are not affraid of trying something new,
you should try captive.

see: http://www.jankratochvil.net/project/captive/

This enables you to read/write NTFS partitions directly.
I needs the original winntfs.sys and other files,
which are copyrighted by Microsoft, and not freely distributable.

On the other hand, you seem to allready have an Win NT* (2000, XP, whatever)
system, so you allready own these files, and you can use them
in this way.

I'm posting this, because it is important to debuk the myth
that it is not possible to dow ntfs r/w under linux.

Note that it is still true that you cannot do this
with full GPLled tools (currently).



Happy hacking!

Pankrat

Nic-MDKman 02-04-2004 03:19 AM

Quote:

*writes down fdisk -l in small linux command reference notebook*
Might want to write that down in your DOS command reference notebook instead. ;) fdisk isnt a linux command. (at least not in any distro I have used)

snacky 02-04-2004 05:00 AM

fdisk came with every linux distro I ever used. It might not come with distros that aren't x86-specific, though.

Better to use cfdisk.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:27 PM.