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Old 03-27-2007, 11:28 AM   #1
energiya
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/boot separate partition


Ok. I've read some tutorials and other "stuff" after some googling but can't really get it. Is it better to have a separate /boot partition? I'm now using one with 80MB.
 
Old 03-27-2007, 11:33 AM   #2
trickykid
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In case of system failure, it's nice to have /boot in it's own partition. Same for /home, /usr, /tmp and /var. If any of these reside in or on / and fill up for any reason, it can cause problems on your system. So if they're on their own partition, if they fill up, / isn't filled up and your system will still normally function properly.
 
Old 03-27-2007, 11:54 AM   #3
jschiwal
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If you have a separate /home partition, you can rename your home directory before installing a different distro, and not format the /home partition when installing. Then you can copy documents or whatever to your new home directory at your leisure later. I have run into the situation of my /usr partition filling up because I didn't reserve enough space for it when I installed Linux. That is the downside. You are fragmenting available space.

Another upside is that you can mount dedicated partition differently, such as using the "noexec" option for /tmp. For servers, you may have some partitions mounted read-only. The Filesystem Hierarchy Standard (on the tldp.org website) has details on which system partitions can be mounted statically.
 
Old 03-27-2007, 12:49 PM   #4
jay73
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Well, if you can spare the partition, why not? It isn't as if if you're wasting a whole lot of space, is it?

But all things well considered, having a boot partition isn't exactly vital either. I used to create one for each of my distros but now that I've gone completely SATA, I'm facing a 15 (actually 14) partitions per disk limit and I prefer to do without them. I do have one left now but only because I needed an ext3 partition to hold my GRUB ( I use XFS for all the rest, which does not go too well with GRUB).

Yes, there is always the risk of / filling up. But when it does, it's usually only because you made it too small to hold all your software. It think it's far more important to keep var on a partition of its own. And if I ever face that situation, I can always boot into one of my other distros do some cleaning up from there.
 
Old 03-27-2007, 01:51 PM   #5
energiya
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Thanks for your answers! I think I'm going to keep my existing partitions (/, /boot and /home), and will do some research about Grub and XFS. I'm currently using XFS and Lilo, but after a recent MBR failure due to lilo, i'm going back to grub.
 
Old 03-27-2007, 04:01 PM   #6
trickykid
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jay73
I used to create one for each of my distros but now that I've gone completely SATA, I'm facing a 15 (actually 14) partitions per disk limit and I prefer to do without them. I do have one left now but only because I needed an ext3 partition to hold my GRUB ( I use XFS for all the rest, which does not go too well with GRUB).
LVM would solve this problem for you on limitations.
 
Old 03-27-2007, 04:13 PM   #7
jay73
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I never considered that, I was not even aware of the possibility. So you are saying that logical volume groups count as single partitions? Or do I misunderstand?
 
Old 03-27-2007, 04:18 PM   #8
PTrenholme
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For Fedora distributions, and others that use LVM by default, having /boot on its own partition is almost required since GRUB does not "understand" LVM partitions. That may change with GRUB2, but the project seems to be moving fairly slowly.
 
  


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