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Old 09-12-2007, 03:35 PM   #1
alice_neo
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how to install any game using wine


hey can any1 tell me how to install games designed 4 windows using wine
 
Old 09-12-2007, 04:09 PM   #2
Brian1
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Not everything will work in wine. Wine is terrible over all. To see what others may have gotten to work check this link I found from a quick google search. http://appdb.winehq.org/appbrowse.php?catId=0

Your better option is vmware and run windows as a guset os. But here you are limited to the generic virtual display it can do. Does not matter if you have a $600 video card you only have a basic video card option in a guest OS setup. If you really want to play a high res gl based game run it on the distro it is meant to run it under.

Brian
 
Old 09-12-2007, 04:39 PM   #3
Nighthawk4
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I run Neverwinter Nights (using the Linux client), plus World of Warcraft (using Cedega or just Wine). Both run faster than in XP.

World of Warcraft is sometimes a little troublesome in Wine, although it is usually OK. In Cedega, it runs better than in Windows. Since it is a Windows game and requires an emulator in order to run on Linux, that doesn't say a lot for the overhead caused by using Windows.

I have had it running successfully in Kubuntu, PCLinuxOS, Slackware 12, CentOS and SuSE 10.1.

I also tried Crossover, which was not as successful. Although it may be good for office systems, with games I found it no better than the free version of Wine. In fact, the only program which ran flawlessly in Crossover was the Palm Books eReader - which Crossover do not support. Oddly enough, this runs flawlessly in Wine as well - so it is probably just a very well-behaved application.

I am not trying to put Crossover down. From the applications they list, it is clear they are aiming for the office market. Cedega always have aimed more for games support (since back when they were called WineX). That just happens to be what I was looking for.

For games support, I would say Cedega seems well worth the money. Nonetheless, the free version of Wine is pretty amazing as well. To see a Windows application running on a Linux system better and faster than on Windows is still pretty amazing. It would be much better if developers released Linux versions of their games (as Bioware did for NWN - although not for NWN2). Until they do, Wine and the various commercial flavours of it are the best we can hope for. Perhaps Apple might actually have done us a favour - after all, MacOS X is essentially Linux as far as I can see. Maybe Games developers will produce Mac versions of their games - which might lead to Linux ones as well. I admit I don't know much about games availability for the Mac - nor much about the Macs themselves unfortunately - so this might not be much help in reality.

As for how to install a game in Wine - just type 'wine setup.exe', or whatever the installation executable is, in a console session. For Cedega, you run the Gui and click 'Install'. In each case, the Installer runs (if you are lucky), just as in Windows. Some games have minor issues, either when installing or running them. For example, in WoW, you need to select the OSS sound option rather than ALSA, or the Installer crashes. It seems to work if you go back to ALSA after it has installed, although OSS also works and gives sound in the game. WoW seems to prefer that you do not use the Launcher, especially in Wine - although Cedega usually copes even with the Launcher. You can turn off the Launcher option in the WoW login screen, even though it now defaults to 'on' rather than 'off' as it used to do.

Hope that helps - happy gaming in Linux. Many thanks to the guys behind Wine.

Last edited by Nighthawk4; 09-12-2007 at 04:42 PM.
 
Old 09-13-2007, 06:09 PM   #4
oskar
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The best way is to just tell us which ones you want to install. Nothing is more difficult to install in linux than games... because they all have different issues.

And cut the l33t crap... it just makes your posts harder to read.

Last edited by oskar; 09-13-2007 at 06:11 PM.
 
Old 09-14-2007, 01:59 AM   #5
vmelkon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nighthawk4 View Post
I run Neverwinter Nights (using the Linux client), plus World of Warcraft (using Cedega or just Wine). Both run faster than in XP.
How could it run faster than in Win XP? What FPS are your getting?
 
Old 09-14-2007, 11:16 AM   #6
Spinlock
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vmelkon View Post
How could it run faster than in Win XP?
Well, it's pretty simple, really. From the Wine website:
Quote:
Originally Posted by http://www.winehq.org/site/myths
Myth 1: "Wine is slow because it is an emulator"
Some people mean by that that Wine must emulate each processor instruction of the Windows application. This is plain wrong. As Wine's name says: "Wine Is Not an Emulator": Wine does not emulate the Intel x86 processor. It will thus not be as slow as Wabi which, since it is not running on a x86 Intel processor, also has to emulate the processor. Windows applications that do not make system calls will run just as fast as on Windows (no more no less).

Some people argue that since Wine introduces an extra layer above the system a Windows application will run slowly. It is true that, in theory, Windows applications that run in Wine or are recompiled with Winelib will not be able to achieve the same performance as native Unix applications. But that's theory. In practice you will find that a well written Windows application can beat a badly written Unix application at any time. The efficiency of the algorithms used by the application will have a greater impact on its performance than Wine.

Also, and that's what people are usually interested in, the combination Wine+Unix may be more efficient that Windows. Just as before it's just how good/bad their respective algorithms are. Now to be frank, performance is not yet a Wine priority. Getting more applications to actually work in Wine is much more important right now. For instance most benchmarks do not work yet in Wine and getting them to work at all should obviously have a higher priority than getting them to perform well.

But for those applications that do work and from a purely subjective point of view, performance is good. There is no obvious performance loss, except for some slow graphics due to unoptimized Wine code and X11 driver translation performance loss (which can be a problem sometimes, though).
Quote:
Originally Posted by http://www.winehq.org/site/myths
Myth 3: "Emulators like VMware are better"
Sure they're better.. if you like purchasing a full copy of an operating system just to run it under a virtual machine. Not to mention you need to purchase a copy of VMware to make it work.

Oh, and don't forget the huge performance hit you take to run an application on a full-blown operating system running on top of an operating system.

However, having said that there are instances where emulators are quite useful. Developers can create sandboxes to run applications in, test other operating systems without rebooting, etc. But having a full-blown emulator just to run a word processor probably isn't the best solution.
Quote:
Originally Posted by "http://www.winehq.org/site/myths"[B
Myth 6: "Wine will always be playing catch up to Windows and can't possibly succeed at running new applications"[/B]
The architecture of Wine makes adding new APIs (or DLLs) fairly easy. Wine developers rapidly add functions as needed, even applications requiring the latest functionality are usually reported working within a few months of release. Examples of this include Office XP and Max Payne (a DirectX 8.0 game) - both of which were fairly new as of this writing (5/2002.)

In addition, Wine supports using native DLLs when the built-in versions don't function properly. In many cases, it's possible to use native DLL versions to gain access to 100% of the functions an application requires.
The most important of those quotes is the first one. In cases where Linux has implemented a function more efficiently than Windows, execution of that function can and will be faster when accessed through Wine.

In the case of World of Warcraft, I'm going to assume that network performance is somewhat more important than in some other games. As long as your graphic performance is in good standing (read: Nvidia or Intel card, for now), then the bottleneck is the network performance.

The TCP stack and associated such things are being constantly worked on in Linux. I should know; I had to patch it when I compiled my most recent kernel, due to a change made by somebody (not that it matters.) The Windows TCP stack? They might update it every six months, MAYBE.

I fully believe that World of Warcraft performance can be better on Linux than in Windows, given certain conditions. Will it always be? Probably not, no. But sometimes is still pretty good for weekend hackers.
 
Old 09-14-2007, 09:59 PM   #7
oskar
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The few games that I run in wine are adjusted exactly the same as I had them in windows (all effects to max and 1028x768)... So I would say they are equally fast. Who cares for +/- 10 frames?
 
Old 09-15-2007, 02:05 PM   #8
vmelkon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oskar View Post
The few games that I run in wine are adjusted exactly the same as I had them in windows (all effects to max and 1028x768)... So I would say they are equally fast. Who cares for +/- 10 frames?
It really depends on the game but if you are running a recent game (ie: something that stresses the graphics a lot), it is pretty much likely running with lower FPS.

It's not necessarily a Wine issue.
TCP/IP stack????

So, I was surprised to hear it runs faster than on Win XP.
 
Old 09-15-2007, 07:56 PM   #9
oskar
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I doubt that too, but I couldn't care less. Everything above 24 fps is good enough for a human, right.
The most recent one I'm running is Prey. No problems whatsoever. Everything to max - as I said.
3100+ Sempron (1x 1.8Ghz), 1gig Ram and a 7600GT.

Last edited by oskar; 09-15-2007 at 08:00 PM.
 
Old 03-22-2010, 08:33 AM   #10
elsevier
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age of empires 3

Can anyone tell me if there is anything specific to keep in mind when installing Age of Empires 3 on wine?
 
Old 03-25-2010, 11:00 AM   #11
oskar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elsevier View Post
Can anyone tell me if there is anything specific to keep in mind when installing Age of Empires 3 on wine?
Your best bet is to bump a couple more 3+ year old threads imo.
 
Old 03-28-2010, 06:01 PM   #12
Hammett
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nighthawk4 View Post
Perhaps Apple might actually have done us a favour - after all, MacOS X is essentially Linux as far as I can see. Maybe Games developers will produce Mac versions of their games - which might lead to Linux ones as well.
I have to disagree with that. Linux comes from Unix and Mac OS comes from BSD that at the same time comes from Unix. Unfortunately, BDS and Linux share little things. You cannot take a Mac application and run it with Linux neither the other way around.

I do not think Apple is making us any kind of favor. I see no increment in Mac games nor in Linux games. Developers just don't care about other platforms besides PC, and as times goes by, less games are released for PC in favor to consoles, so... the future is not quite bright when it comes to games for PC and even less bright when it comes to Linux.

I hate to say this, but not even Cedega, Crossover or wine is helping Linux OS to get more games. From a developer's point of view, why they have to provide a Linux version of the game and waste money, resources and support when they know wine's developers will take care to make it run under Linux at a more or less good quality? Don't get me wrong, i LOVE wine exists and they are doing an amazing work and I honestly won't thank them enough for the rest of my life, but I also think it's a bad thing for Linux platform because of the exposed above.

Last edited by Hammett; 03-28-2010 at 06:03 PM.
 
Old 03-31-2010, 09:14 AM   #13
vmelkon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammett View Post
I hate to say this, but not even Cedega, Crossover or wine is helping Linux OS to get more games. From a developer's point of view, why they have to provide a Linux version of the game and waste money, resources and support when they know wine's developers will take care to make it run under Linux at a more or less good quality? Don't get me wrong, i LOVE wine exists and they are doing an amazing work and I honestly won't thank them enough for the rest of my life, but I also think it's a bad thing for Linux platform because of the exposed above.
I agree. That's something that I have said a long time ago but other people have disagreed with me. Ironically, those other Linux users are not gamers

The interesting news is that Steam will be coming to Linux. Perhaps a few companies will make Linux games and make a profit.
 
  


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