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Linux From Scratch This Forum is for the discussion of LFS.
LFS is a project that provides you with the steps necessary to build your own custom Linux system.

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Old 03-20-2013, 04:45 PM   #1
c129084
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Installing software


I have a couple of questions concerning the installation of new software in a LFS system.

(btw, I have not started an installation yet, I was just reading trough the manuals)

Because I have no package manager (or automated installation system like apt or yum) I assume any new software needs to be compiled from source. Is there any way to determine which dependencies need to be installed first. Is there like a trial run to see what's missing, or do I need to make (software), make (dependency1), make (dependency2), make (dependency3) until I give up?

Second question:
To use gedit (for instance) I need a lot more programs to actually compile this software, then to just run it. Meaning, after compiling gedit I could remove a whole lot of programs, and still be able to use gedit (like for instance GCC, which should not be needed to run most software). After compiling all my favorite software it would we impossible to know which programs can be removed to keep my system as clean (and low on disk usage) as possible.
How is this normally done? Is software compiled in a different (lets say livecd kinda) environment before it is installed in the 'chroot' environment? Or do normal linux users don't care about these sort of things.

Thanks in advance
 
Old 03-20-2013, 04:56 PM   #2
spiky0011
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Hi the 1st place to start is read the manuel
Next check this page You must make sure your host is compliant.
If unsure post the output of the script.
Yes all the packages are compiled from source.
Follow the book all will go well
 
Old 03-20-2013, 06:15 PM   #3
TobiSGD
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Removing GCC wouldn't be a smart move, since you will need it to install new software (or possible security updates, drivers, ...).
I would not remove any software, disk space is cheap and software that isn't running doesn't need any other resources.

Having said that, while LFS is a nice learning experience I wouldn't recommend it for everyday use (though it actually is possible), especially if you aren't using a package management system. Keeping your system up-to-date can be quite cumbersome on such a system.
I would rather recommend to go through LFS but use a different distro for your everyday purposes, one that comes with package management and software updates. If you want to use LFS because of the great control you have over the system you might want to look at Slackware, Gentoo or Arch.
 
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Old 03-21-2013, 01:44 AM   #4
c129084
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Thanks for the answer Tobi. That clears up some things for me. (any why, for everyday use I will not be using LFS)
But for the sake of argument, do you still have an answer to my first question? How does one determine what dependencies need to be met before installing something from source?

---------- Post added 03-21-13 at 07:44 AM ----------

Thanks for the answer Tobi. That clears up some things for me. (any why, for everyday use I will not be using LFS)
But for the sake of argument, do you still have an answer to my first question? How does one determine what dependencies need to be met before installing something from source?
 
Old 03-21-2013, 03:39 AM   #5
spiky0011
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Hi

When you install a package and the dependencies
are not met it will tell you what is missing
You can also google a package and ot.s dependencies
 
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Old 03-21-2013, 03:55 AM   #6
spiky0011
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this might help this is the follow on from lfs
http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/blfs/view/svn/
 
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Old 03-21-2013, 04:19 AM   #7
Keith Hedger
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
... I wouldn't recommend it for everyday use (though it actually is possible), especially if you aren't using a package management system. Keeping your system up-to-date can be quite cumbersome on such a system. ...
I have been using a full xfce based desktop LFS system EXCLUSIVELY for about a year now, it is no more difficult to keep updated than any other system and if you don't want/need to update a piece of software you don't have to, compare this with say debian that installs/updates lots of dependencies whenever you you decide to update or install a new piece of software, in fact I used various debian based distros when I first started using linux and frankly the package manager was a nightmare and frequently mucked up the system.

Updating and installing your own dependencies is much more sensible especially as most software comes with a number of optional functions which you may or may not decide to use.

There are a number of package manager solutions available for LFS like this:http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...7/#post4857864
for instance ( shameless plug ).
 
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Old 03-21-2013, 11:09 AM   #8
c129084
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Thanks for all your answers,

Marked as SOLVED
 
  


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