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Old 11-29-2012, 04:57 AM   #1
sunveer
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Root Login


Do Company persons login as root or a regular user? If they login as regular user, then how do they manage their operations which can only be performed by root.

I am doing root user operations using sudo but its very frustrating.
 
Old 11-29-2012, 05:11 AM   #2
snowpine
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Hi, can you explain the frustration of using 'sudo'? I'm not sure I understand the question; which tasks specifically you are having trouble accomplishing with 'sudo'? Also, which distribution are you using, and have you read your distro's documentation about sudo/root user?
 
Old 11-29-2012, 05:55 AM   #3
sunveer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowpine View Post
Hi, can you explain the frustration of using 'sudo'? I'm not sure I understand the question; which tasks specifically you are having trouble accomplishing with 'sudo'? Also, which distribution are you using, and have you read your distro's documentation about sudo/root user?
Means I have habit of directly entering commands, and with sudo every command has to be prefixed with sudo. I am using RHEL.
 
Old 11-29-2012, 06:00 AM   #4
steelneck
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The only ones who login as root should be system admins, not regular users.

You have to give us examples of the "root-operations" you have in mind. Normally a regular user can use all programs on the system, with the exception of those installed under sbin and those programs are restricted for very good reasons. If you talk about accessing CDs, scanners and so on, this can usually be solved by having users with the right group permissions.
 
Old 11-29-2012, 06:06 AM   #5
sunveer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steelneck View Post
The only ones who login as root should be system admins, not regular users.

You have to give us examples of the "root-operations" you have in mind. Normally a regular user can use all programs on the system, with the exception of those installed under sbin and those programs are restricted for very good reasons. If you talk about accessing CDs, scanners and so on, this can usually be solved by having users with the right group permissions.
Like installing packages using yum or configuring any services.
 
Old 11-29-2012, 06:09 AM   #6
snowpine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunveer View Post
Means I have habit of directly entering commands, and with sudo every command has to be prefixed with sudo. I am using RHEL.
Which is bad why? You really aren't giving enough details to help us answer your question. So far in this thread you have typed 417 characters, which is equivalent to typing 'sudo<space>' 83 times, in your quest to avoid 5 keystrokes.

Anyway if you know the root password you can get a root shell with:

Code:
su -
If you don't know the root password and your admin has asked you to use 'sudo' you'll have to discuss it with him/her.

Last edited by snowpine; 11-29-2012 at 06:25 AM.
 
Old 11-29-2012, 06:18 AM   #7
druuna
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As stated before by others: do not become root unless you really, really need to.

If typing 5 extra characters is a problem or you are prone to forget the sudo<space> part: Why don't you alias those commands?
Code:
alias xyx='sudo xyz'
 
Old 11-29-2012, 06:19 AM   #8
sunveer
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I am the admin and since it is advised to login as regular user instead of root user for security reasons, that's why I want to ask how can I manage my work while logged in as regular user. Or I have to login as root to perform the day to day work.
 
Old 11-29-2012, 06:24 AM   #9
snowpine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunveer View Post
I am the admin and since it is advised to login as regular user instead of root user for security reasons, that's why I want to ask how can I manage my work while logged in as regular user. Or I have to login as root to perform the day to day work.
My recommendation is to log in as regular user for everyday tasks and use 'sudo' or 'su -' to perform only those tasks which require root priv's.

You haven't given any specific examples of which tasks are problematic, it is hard to discuss this in the abstract.
 
Old 11-29-2012, 06:35 AM   #10
sunveer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowpine View Post
My recommendation is to log in as regular user for everyday tasks and use 'sudo' or 'su -' to perform only those tasks which require root priv's.

You haven't given any specific examples of which tasks are problematic, it is hard to discuss this in the abstract.
It is no hard but since its my first time using sudo so I forget to enter sudo every first time. But thanks to tell me that I am doing the things the right way.
 
Old 12-06-2012, 08:29 PM   #11
Adickel
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I work in an enterprise Linux environment, I have root access to all our Linux environments and regularly login as root, a lot of my work just can't be done as a regular user.
 
Old 12-19-2012, 03:39 AM   #12
solarisguy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adickel View Post
I work in an enterprise Linux environment, I have root access to all our Linux environments and regularly login as root, a lot of my work just can't be done as a regular user.
Use "sudo su -" to become root. It leaves an audit trail for activities of your user account, yet allows you to operate without prepending "sudo" to every command.
 
Old 12-19-2012, 07:24 AM   #13
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by solarisguy View Post
Use "sudo su -" to become root. It leaves an audit trail for activities of your user account, yet allows you to operate without prepending "sudo" to every command.
The correct way to get a root shell using sudo is
Code:
sudo -i
 
Old 12-20-2012, 01:13 AM   #14
wstewart
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
The correct way to get a root shell using sudo is
Code:
sudo -i
That's just one way of doing it unless you can think of a reason why one souldn't use "sudo su". It works just as well and is probably a little easier to type.
 
Old 12-20-2012, 01:45 AM   #15
druuna
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wstewart View Post
That's just one way of doing it unless you can think of a reason why one souldn't use "sudo su". It works just as well and is probably a little easier to type.
No, it doesn't work the same/just as well.

sudo -i simulates a login shell and sets environment accordingly.
sudo su a partial environment is set (no .profile/.login is read).

Have a look at the sudo man page.
 
  


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