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Old 05-29-2006, 04:19 AM   #1
wanna13e
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Talking Revert glibc to a earlier version


Hi Gurus,

I was doing installing glibc-2.2.4-26.src.rpm using the command "rpm --rpmbuild" and it started installing. Suddenly, user kept calling in that they can't access the website host on this server. I got no choice but to "ctrl-C" and it's stopped. My question is ; Can I revert to earlier version? Or can I continue to install the src.rpm using the same command? Or if I reboot the server, will it hanged?

Plse help me here...

Thanks alot.
 
Old 05-30-2006, 02:58 AM   #2
xode
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You most likely will need to do a complete reinstall of your linux system. Even if your machine reboots without hanging, can you consider it reliable at this point? If you can, you want to save all of your data on that server without rebooting. In any case, while reinstalling your linux, be sure to preserve /var and /home, since that is where your data is going to be.

In general, you do not want to upgrade across linux distribution boundaries. You want to save your data and do a complete wipe of the old distribution and clean install of the new distribution instead. I have found distribution boundaries to be defined by glibc and initscripts needing to be upgraded.

Last edited by xode; 05-30-2006 at 03:01 AM.
 
Old 05-31-2006, 01:21 AM   #3
wanna13e
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xode
You most likely will need to do a complete reinstall of your linux system. Even if your machine reboots without hanging, can you consider it reliable at this point? If you can, you want to save all of your data on that server without rebooting. In any case, while reinstalling your linux, be sure to preserve /var and /home, since that is where your data is going to be.

In general, you do not want to upgrade across linux distribution boundaries. You want to save your data and do a complete wipe of the old distribution and clean install of the new distribution instead. I have found distribution boundaries to be defined by glibc and initscripts needing to be upgraded.

Xode, thanks a million for the advice.
 
Old 05-31-2006, 02:38 AM   #4
xode
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Did you get your problem fixed?
 
Old 06-04-2006, 09:34 PM   #5
wanna13e
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xode
Did you get your problem fixed?
Hi xode,

Need yr help here...

I search the net and found out that the command "rpm --rebuild" only build but do not install? Am I correct or wrong? Plse correct me.

I did a reboot and found the following error...

Jun 4 07:33:14 xfs: ignoring font path element /usr/X11R6/lib/X11/fonts/local (unreadable)
Jun 4 07:33:14 xfs: ignoring font path element /usr/X11R6/lib/X11/fonts/latin2/Type1 (unreadable)
Jun 4 07:33:14 xfs: ignoring font path element /usr/share/AbiSuite/fonts (unreadable)

I remember I stopped the rpm command when it's running some kind of UTF fonts process.

Nevertheless, I was able to reboot but I will keep an eye on it.
 
Old 06-05-2006, 07:42 PM   #6
xode
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Quote:
From wanna13e

I search the net and found out that the command "rpm --rebuild" only build but do not install? Am I correct or wrong? Plse correct me.
My understanding, according to what the RPM package descriptions for RPM and RPMbuild say, is that is correct. One of the tools that I have found to be most useful is a GUI frontend for RPM, such as kpackage. With that, at a glance, I can see what is on my system, who depends on what, what each RPM contains and where it is installed on my system, a summary description of what each RPM does, and more.

Quote:
From wanna13e

Jun 4 07:33:14 xfs: ignoring font path element /usr/X11R6/lib/X11/fonts/local (unreadable)
Jun 4 07:33:14 xfs: ignoring font path element /usr/X11R6/lib/X11/fonts/latin2/Type1 (unreadable)
Jun 4 07:33:14 xfs: ignoring font path element /usr/share/AbiSuite/fonts (unreadable)
If you can find out what package those files are supposed to belong to, you can try to uninstall and reinstall the package, if it won't crash your system. Based on the closest match to what your errors show, the package on my system that contains similar files is Xfree. If that is the case with your system, then you don't want to try to uninstall and reinstall that package. You want to do the complete system reinstall as I originally suggested.

Quote:
From wanna13e

Nevertheless, I was able to reboot but I will keep an eye on it.
This simply means that you got a reprieve from total disaster that you would do well to take advantage of by reinstalling your system in an orderly manner instead of the panic that you would otherwise be in. If you have a second computer, you might want to build up a new system on it while this one still functions. There is no telling when other errors might crop up or when your system suddenly becomes unbootable. Further, it will probably take you less time to do a complete system reinstall than to try to figure out how to correct these errors. By the way, did you save your data?

Last edited by xode; 06-05-2006 at 07:43 PM.
 
Old 06-12-2006, 05:40 AM   #7
wanna13e
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xode
My understanding, according to what the RPM package descriptions for RPM and RPMbuild say, is that is correct. One of the tools that I have found to be most useful is a GUI frontend for RPM, such as kpackage. With that, at a glance, I can see what is on my system, who depends on what, what each RPM contains and where it is installed on my system, a summary description of what each RPM does, and more.



If you can find out what package those files are supposed to belong to, you can try to uninstall and reinstall the package, if it won't crash your system. Based on the closest match to what your errors show, the package on my system that contains similar files is Xfree. If that is the case with your system, then you don't want to try to uninstall and reinstall that package. You want to do the complete system reinstall as I originally suggested.



This simply means that you got a reprieve from total disaster that you would do well to take advantage of by reinstalling your system in an orderly manner instead of the panic that you would otherwise be in. If you have a second computer, you might want to build up a new system on it while this one still functions. There is no telling when other errors might crop up or when your system suddenly becomes unbootable. Further, it will probably take you less time to do a complete system reinstall than to try to figure out how to correct these errors. By the way, did you save your data?
Oic.... Thanks alot man. I'm trying out mondorescue to backup my data. Do you know which mount point should I save in order to make a bootable restore Linux CD? Beside, /var, /usr, /dev and /home? Did I miss anything out?


Thanks a million.
 
Old 06-12-2006, 11:24 AM   #8
xode
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You probably want to save /var and /home first, since that is where most of your data is going to be, and you don't need to save them to a bootable CD, since you will need to reinstall your system before you can again use that data. Beyond that, you want to save whatever other changes to your system that you manually made, typically /etc. Unless you manually created a device or link in /dev, you don't need to save anything in /dev since your system reinstall will recreate /dev. The same applies to /usr. It would be nice, but not necessary to have a bootable rescue CD. Your priority should be to get your data saved. All of the above assumes that you have the install CDs for your system.
 
Old 06-13-2006, 01:21 AM   #9
wanna13e
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Revert glibc to a earlier version

Quote:
Originally Posted by xode
You probably want to save /var and /home first, since that is where most of your data is going to be, and you don't need to save them to a bootable CD, since you will need to reinstall your system before you can again use that data. Beyond that, you want to save whatever other changes to your system that you manually made, typically /etc. Unless you manually created a device or link in /dev, you don't need to save anything in /dev since your system reinstall will recreate /dev. The same applies to /usr. It would be nice, but not necessary to have a bootable rescue CD. Your priority should be to get your data saved. All of the above assumes that you have the install CDs for your system.
Great man... Thanks so much guru xode.
 
Old 06-13-2006, 03:24 AM   #10
xode
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Quote:
From wanna13e

Great man... Thanks so much guru xode.
You're welcome. By the way, you might also want to save /root also. Further, I have found it useful to document in detail all of the changes that I have made to my system since the time that I (re)installed it, such changes being what packages I have added, what configuration files I have changed and where they are located, and what I used to change them, and more. I keep all of those changes in a subdirectory under /root, so /root is also a directory that I include when I do my periodic backup.
 
  


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