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Linux - Embedded & Single-board computer This forum is for the discussion of Linux on both embedded devices and single-board computers (such as the Raspberry Pi, BeagleBoard and PandaBoard). Discussions involving Arduino, plug computers and other micro-controller like devices are also welcome.

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Old 06-10-2008, 05:55 AM   #1
raedbenz
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How to make my life easier with embedded Linux??????????


HI,,,,
why Embedded Linux is complicated???? i have been mad with tool chain , kernel, installing procedures , etc...

Is there a graphical IDE like in Windows to be installed in Linux??
just by double clicking the installation package and run the IDE then just click new project and select target, add the appropriate header and here we go.....

how can make life easier with embedded Linux??? i am really desperate.
help..
tanks
 
Old 06-10-2008, 06:18 AM   #2
pixellany
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I have no experience with this, but here are some suggestions to get better help here:
First, describe exactly what you are doing.--e.g. I infer that you are trying to compile something to install in a device. Tell us what the device is, what "tool chain" you are using, etc.
Second, tell us exactly what the problems are. "i have been mad with tool chain ... etc." does not tell us anything.
Third, try searching Google for--e.g.--"IDE for Linux" or "IDE for embedded Linux development"
 
Old 06-10-2008, 06:45 AM   #3
raedbenz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany View Post
I have no experience with this, but here are some suggestions to get better help here:
First, describe exactly what you are doing.--e.g. I infer that you are trying to compile something to install in a device. Tell us what the device is, what "tool chain" you are using, etc.
Second, tell us exactly what the problems are. "i have been mad with tool chain ... etc." does not tell us anything.
Third, try searching Google for--e.g.--"IDE for Linux" or "IDE for embedded Linux development"
HI,,,
i have been working on embedded systems for 3 years now.
all my job is on Windows with many IDE's (like Keil, MikroC, etc...)
Quote:
First, describe exactly what you are doing.
I want to develop code for ARM target form a Linx x86 host.
Quote:
Second, tell us exactly what the problems are. "i have been mad with tool chain ...
i mean installing a toolchain is much tough for new users to Linux.
why it is not easy things like in Windows, just double click the .exe and a couple of Nexts then ready to go.
the toolchain was shipped by the board i use , (Olimex Cs-E9302, ARM9 )
Quote:
Third, try searching Google for--e.g.--"IDE for Linux" or "IDE for embedded Linux development"
i have searched some IDEs but i want to get some recommendations from some one already has experienced ceratin IDEs.

thanks
 
Old 06-10-2008, 07:13 AM   #4
pixellany
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Quote:
why it is not easy things like in Windows, just double click the .exe and a couple of Nexts then ready to go.
I now use Windows only when I have no choice---eg at the office in certain environments. While I find MANY things that are easier and more straightforward in Linux, it IS true that some things are easier in Windows.
 
Old 06-10-2008, 07:35 AM   #5
pinniped
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If you want the absolute smallest memory/storage 'footprint' it takes a lot of work. I set up my system something like this:

directory for base system
--directory for source code
--directory for patches
--directory for build scripts

directory for test/setup tools
--source code
--patches
--build scripts

various directories for software on different projects
--source code
--patches
--build scripts

Now the project directories have build scripts that invoke any number of build scripts from the base and 'essential tools' directories; the project directories also contain the kernel configuration files for that specific project. (After all, one project may use ARM/XScale while another uses x86 and so on...)

The source/version tracking for each system is another interesting exercise.

Once I've sorted out everything on a particular project, I find the build time is usually under 30 minutes. So I just start a script before walking out to get my coffee. Personally I don't like the graphical "click here, click there, and you have a magic solution". With those tools there is so much not in your control and so much hidden from you. Sure they're 'quick', but you end up with a pig of a system rather than a well-designed system; you may as well just get a Debian CD for ARM and install a base system then go from there - that's about the equivalent of those GUI toys.
 
Old 06-10-2008, 07:43 AM   #6
raedbenz
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toolchain

hi pinniped.
plz check this thread,
regarding installing the toolchain if u can help me:

http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/ubu...urce-code.html

thanks
 
Old 06-11-2008, 01:36 AM   #7
pinniped
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"plz check this thread, regarding installing the toolchain if u can help me"

I followed the link and I have no idea what that has to do with your question.
What board have you got? What build environment are you trying to set up - was it provided by the board manufacturer or are you trying to set up an embedded development environment on your own?
 
Old 06-11-2008, 11:48 AM   #8
theNbomr
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There are development tools for embedded systems which have lots of fancy GUIs and so on. These tend to be 'fee-ware', and not inexpensive. Windriver makes the vxWorks OS, and their product line includes a graphical development suite. I'm fairly certain it can be run on some flavor of Linux. There are others. I think the Eclipse platform is intended to permit integration of cross development tools in some generic way. Maybe someone has developed plugins that will increase your comfort level.
Many embedded systems programmers are quite comfortable with the commandline, scripting, and a GUI in the form of a waveform on an oscilloscope or logic analyzer. There is almost by definition a target-specific element to configuring a build system for an embedded system. It is helpful to be able to embed comments in Makefiles and other scripted tools that explain the reasons why, for example, certain compiler switches are necessary. Often, in GUI tools, configurations are buried in proprietary binary format files, and these do not fit in well with things like revision control systems, nor do they promote commenting or other crucial explanatory documentation.
I find GUI development suites most helpful when the target environment is the build environment. The edit-compile-run cycle can be significantly compressed in this setting. When the target CPU boots from a ROM or over the network, there is a natural interruption of that cycle, so the benefit of the GUI toolchain is lost anyway. Also, many embedded systems have little or no standard IO system which can be captured in the 'run' window of the GUI. Often, the console is a serial port, which one commonly accesses with a standalone terminal emulator. I like to use C-Kermit for this, and usually develop some kind of script to automate the testing process, and these scripts become part of the test and development tool set, and is archived in a code management system.
It is probably a truth that embedded systems work isn't for everyone...
--- rod.
 
  


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