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Paxmaster 01-19-2005 03:21 PM

just got ubuntu live cd and install cd
 
i want to know what is the password for the root for the live cd

i want to apt-get it complain i need to be in root in order to do that

thnks

XavierP 01-19-2005 03:52 PM

root is disabled on ubuntu. Use sudo apt-get <program> followed by your password to run it.

JerryMcFarts 03-18-2005 06:45 PM

Why did they take out the root account? Isn't this a security line of defense that they took out?

just wondering,

thanks.

Greyweather 03-18-2005 09:17 PM

https://www.ubuntulinux.org/wiki/RootSudo

Isn't sudo less secure than su?

The basic security model is the same, and therefore these two systems share their primary weaknesses. Any user who uses su or sudo must be considered to be a privileged user. If that user's account is compromised by an attacker, the attacker can also gain root privileges the next time the user does so. The user account is the weak link in this chain, and so must be protected with the same care as root. On a more esoteric level, sudo provides some features which encourage different work habits, which can positively impact the security of the system. sudo is commonly used to execute only a single command, while su is generally used to open a shell and execute multiple commands. The sudo approach reduces the likelihood of a root shell being left open indefinitely, and encourages the user to minimize their use of root privileges.



While there are various advantages and disadvantages to this approach, compared with the traditional superuser model, neither is clearly superior overall.

By encouraging the execution of single commands with root privileges, rather than opening a shell, sudo:

-Reduces the amount of time spent with root privileges, and thus the risk of inadvertently executing a command as root

-Provides a more useful audit trail

Having a separate root password provides an extra layer of protection if an administrative user's password is compromised

In either case, if the administrative user (who uses sudo or su to become root) is compromised, the attacker can generally gain root through an indirect attack

trinikrono 05-06-2008 12:52 AM

sorry for being really late
 
so i was searching for answer for the same question raised here. Which i still found wasnt answered but then i remebered something and decided too post.
Run the following command too change the root user's password
sudo passwd root

and it will ask you for the new password you can put it as 1 or something:
just something for you guys who love su instead of sudo

aeb1 06-05-2010 06:20 PM

Using a 10.04 LIVE CD as ROOT
 
I needed to fix an existing Linux 8.04 LTS system that crashed because of an upgrade ( the AUTOMOUNT system somehow had the /auto directory deleted on the existing system )

To edit the ORIGINAL boot drive, I brought up a ubuntu 10.04 LIVE CD in the system.

The key command: sudo su in a Terminal Window.

This allowed me to replace the missing /auto directory on the original drive. The system now boots normally.

mellor 03-02-2012 05:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trinikrono (Post 3144138)
so i was searching for answer for the same question raised here. Which i still found wasnt answered but then i remebered something and decided too post.
Run the following command too change the root user's password
sudo passwd root

and it will ask you for the new password you can put it as 1 or something:
just something for you guys who love su instead of sudo

Thank You!!
Worked like a charm....

Here is why I NEDDED the su/root password.
Customers Ubuntu OS crapped out. I needed to pull the db, but couldn't access the directory unless I was root or su.
I couldn't sudo cd.

So thank you for posting an easy work around to an OS oversight.


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