LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions
User Name
Password
Linux - Distributions This forum is for Distribution specific questions.
Red Hat, Slackware, Debian, Novell, LFS, Mandriva, Ubuntu, Fedora - the list goes on and on... Note: An (*) indicates there is no official participation from that distribution here at LQ.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 09-06-2007, 08:13 PM   #1
stairwayoflight
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2006
Posts: 59

Rep: Reputation: 15
distro & gnome/kde suggestions for enterprise (windows network)


Hello,

I am interested in helping a Windows-centric company do a partial migration to linux. Recently the CEO told IT to "replace all pc's with macs." The head of accounting/finance informed the CEO of the cost of this move, and he choked and decided against the idea. But the point is, they are open to something new.

It is a small company, with a website, a corporate office, and a school. So there is an internet lounge, office workstations, macs for content creation (mostly web/print, including some video/audio resources distributed on cd/dvd and online).

Forgive me if this kind of question has been asked already, but what are the qualities of any given distribution that must be weighed in this context?

Perhaps the greatest one is "ease of use" which means which tools am I more familiar with, in that case I would lean towards Debian/Ubuntu.

I will begin with setting up a "case study" desktop workstation (or group of them if I am allowed) with either kde or gnome. If anyone has any experience locking down kde and gnome please comment on which experience was more satisfying and why. I have enjoyed both as a user, but as a beginning linux user I am hoping to understand which is more simple or even intuitive to administer.
 
Old 09-07-2007, 01:07 PM   #2
Simon Bridge
Guru
 
Registered: Oct 2003
Location: Waiheke NZ
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 9,211

Rep: Reputation: 197Reputation: 197
Once you have the interface, go specific: which tasks will the new setup be specifically suited to? Which problems are best solved?

Also: your CEO must have a reason for wanting to replace PC's with Macs.
 
Old 09-07-2007, 04:46 PM   #3
farslayer
Guru
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: Willoughby, Ohio
Distribution: linuxdebian
Posts: 7,232
Blog Entries: 5

Rep: Reputation: 189Reputation: 189
Gnome Lockdown tool is called Pessulus

And since you mention there is a school, I would spend some time researching other OS projects and implementations that have been done for schools, to see how the implemented it.

Start small
Get teacher and staff buy-in, don't just surprise them with the switch
and all those other good recommendations you will see in the articles you locate.

Some other places to start..
http://k12os.org/
http://www.schoolforge.net/

Of course by school you could have meant something a bit different... :/
 
Old 09-12-2007, 09:05 PM   #4
SilentSam
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2007
Location: Ottawa
Distribution: Arch Linux/Kubuntu/OpenSUSE
Posts: 287

Rep: Reputation: 31
As others have stated, depending on the software you're looking for, advice may change.

On the whole, however, when the network is set up, it won't really matter to the end users which distribution you set up. What matters most to the end users is the desktop environment. The applications are pretty much shared in KDE from one distro to another, and in Gnome from one distro to another. Even the menus and tools are similar (There are exceptions, such as SUSE, which completely changes KDE and Gnome's default layout). If you wish for multiple users to have admin rights then neglect what I just said.

The speed of the CPU and RAM are also big factors. I found Fedora 7 and OpenSUSE 10.2 for instance to absolutely crawl on two boxes of mine: An AMD Athlon K7 500MHz 384mb DDR RAM, and a P3 825MHz 160mb SDRAM. Gnome tended to run faster on these boxes as well, but KDE on the right distro runs fine on them.

On the administration side, however, there is a lot of difference. Since you will be controlling the package management, this will concern you much more than an end user with no root privileges.

As for myself, I found KDE much more intuitive coming from a windows background than Gnome. Everyone has different tastes when it comes to their respective DE, but KDE is much more windows-like in it's setup. I also found it easier to configure KDE's menu system than Gnome's.

Last edited by SilentSam; 09-12-2007 at 09:06 PM.
 
Old 09-13-2007, 07:15 PM   #5
stairwayoflight
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2006
Posts: 59

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Yes, I think kde will be fine. I am told Debian Sid will be more secure than Stable. Is there really a reason to attempt to stay on the "bleeding edge" with a distro? Otherwise stable it will be--with exceptions perhaps.

The network infrastructure is built around Everest-- a business operating system. Which requires windows for everything. I am told you can work on it from windows terminal services, though, so I don't have to stare at a windows desktop all day at least.

Possible applications for linux/unix:
-everywhere, of course
-but notably:
-internet access lounge (firefox+plugins & openoffice)
-network storage device ("T:\" drive on office systems, could use samba.)
-office machines?
-

Someone in the media department was amazed when I showed them md5sum could be used to verify file integrity. They found out CS3 was crashing on startup because of one corrupted font file. Fixing it requires moving all fonts to a temporary directory. Then they drag one over, try CS3, drag it back. Rinse, repeat until the crash is duplicated.

Man, mac users are such... mac users! I should find/write a script for that one. Tiger doesn't have verified copy (in Finder I suppose) so thats another idea.
 
Old 09-13-2007, 07:18 PM   #6
stairwayoflight
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2006
Posts: 59

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by farslayer View Post
Of course by school you could have meant something a bit different... :/
Yes, it is an informal training school for adults. But I suppose they can act like K-12's sometimes :-)
 
Old 09-13-2007, 09:34 PM   #7
farslayer
Guru
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: Willoughby, Ohio
Distribution: linuxdebian
Posts: 7,232
Blog Entries: 5

Rep: Reputation: 189Reputation: 189
For a production environment I would stick with Stable. Testing and unstable are for testing new packages, changes in the system and bleeding edge packages. Stable on the other hand is rock solid which is what you want in an environment in which you are supporting users. Testing and unstable are great for a PC at home or in the lab, but I wouldn't use them at work.

If you need some newer packages for your stable system look at [url=http://www.backports.org/dokuwiki/doku.php]Debian backports[url] rather than mixing the repositories on your production systems with testing or unstable packages and trying to maintain a mixed system.

Windows terminal services ? that's easy.. rdesktop straight from the Debian repositories. Works great for connecting to windows machines through terminal services from your Linux box.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:06 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration