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johnnyxxxcakes 11-27-2008 10:18 PM

A few questions about Fedora
 
I was running Ubuntu 8.04, then I upgraded to 8.10, and noticed it to be extremely slower. I heard that Canonical has made Ubuntu Intrepid a bit more bloated, and I didn't like that. Then I switched to Linux Mint 5 Elyssa, and now I'm thinking of switching over to Fedora. I've tried Fedora for about an hour, but I just wanted to get settled with a distro that night and quit "hopping". This time I'm thinking of giving Fedora a whirl again, considering the new version 10 just came out.

I hear a lot about Fedora being "bleeding/cutting edge". What exactly do they mean by this?

ronlau9 11-27-2008 11:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by johnnyxxxcakes (Post 3357335)
I was running Ubuntu 8.04, then I upgraded to 8.10, and noticed it to be extremely slower. I heard that Canonical has made Ubuntu Intrepid a bit more bloated, and I didn't like that. Then I switched to Linux Mint 5 Elyssa, and now I'm thinking of switching over to Fedora. I've tried Fedora for about an hour, but I just wanted to get settled with a distro that night and quit "hopping". This time I'm thinking of giving Fedora a whirl again, considering the new version 10 just came out.

I hear a lot about Fedora being "bleeding/cutting edge". What exactly do they mean by this?

Is not better to realize what you expect from the distro you are going to use ?
What kind of stuff did you like to run ?
Which distro support you're hard ware best ?
And than make you're final choice.

billymayday 11-27-2008 11:55 PM

Bleeding edge means it has very recent versions of software included (not necessarily the most stable versions).

Fedora is a testbed for RedHat releases, so much of what we see in Fedora 10 and Fedora 11 will appear in RHEL6 when is comes out later next year. RHEL5 is largely based on Fedora Core 6.

What this means is that Fedora has a short release cycle - 2 versions per year, and each is only formally supported for around 13 months.


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