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-   -   Why not Ubuntu? (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-desktop-74/why-not-ubuntu-4175477415/)

ilesterg 09-17-2013 04:23 AM

Why not Ubuntu?
 
Hi all,

This is a very straighforward question :) What reasons do I have NOT to use Ubuntu Linux as my desktop OS?

I would like to see only the DISADVANTAGES of the mentioned OS please. :)

Cheers!

descendant_command 09-17-2013 04:47 AM

All your friends will point and laugh ...

Randicus Draco Albus 09-17-2013 05:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ilesterg (Post 5029050)
This is a very straighforward question

Intended to start a flame-fest?
A quick look around the various Linux boards, including this one, will provide all the many reasons to not use Ubuntu.

cynwulf 09-17-2013 05:51 AM

I can't think of any disadvantages. As far as distros go, it's horses for courses and there are always pros and cons...

Anything else is just rampant fanboyism in some form or other...

eSelix 09-17-2013 06:04 AM

For common user Ubuntu is as good as any other distribution. What is good for you, or not, depends on what you want from your system. It is highly individual. Things that one people consider as disadvantages, other people can treat as benefits. For example some likes system with newest packages available (they choose rolling-release), other rather prefer stable, even with cost of older programs (for example Debian). Also more than distribution flaws there are specific programs. Like KDE or GNOME. These programs usually decide if you feel comfortable with system. And every other application you will be using daily. For example as I prefer KDE, also prefer GTK applications, they are usually more stable. If someone tell you about disadvantages of specific (mature) distribution, it will be rather dislikes or things not strictly tied to distribution.

cascade9 09-17-2013 06:04 AM

Very short support length on current and future 'Non-LTS' releases.

Amazon 'spyware' in current and future versions of ubuntu (yes, its removable, but by default its there...)

Canonical contributor agreement.

Quote:

2.1 Copyright License

(b) To the maximum extent permitted by the relevant law,
You grant to Us a perpetual, worldwide, non-exclusive,
transferable, royalty-free, irrevocable license under the
Copyright covering the Contribution, with the right to
sublicense such rights through multiple tiers of
sublicensees, to reproduce, modify, display, perform and
distribute the Contribution as part of the Material; provided
that this license is conditioned upon compliance with
Section 2.3.

2.3 Outbound License
Based on the grant of rights in Sections 2.1 and 2.2, if We
include Your Contribution in a Material, We may license the
Contribution under any license, including copyleft,
permissive, commercial, or proprietary licenses. As a
condition on the exercise of this right, We agree to also
license the Contribution under the terms of the license or
licenses which We are using for the Material on the
Submission Date.
http://www.canonical.com/sites/defau...-CLA-ANY-I.pdf

Unity. Canonical could have worked with gnome 3 which seems to be driven by similar ideas and goals. But rather than contribute to Gnome 3, they would rather have a version they have full control over and have the option to sell to 3rd parties if they wish.

Mir. Everybody else is planning on either staying with xorg, or moving to wayland. Like Unity/gnome 3, its another 'we want full control and the ability to sell to 3rd parties even if there is already a open source project doing pretty much the same job' project.

Using ubuntu also makes canonical look like a bigger player in the linux world than they really are, and feeds into the cult of Shuttleworth.

cynwulf 09-17-2013 10:40 AM

Ah, I didn't bother with ideological reasons as I assume that the user doesn't care - as most people don't care about those teenagers who worked long hours for little pay to produce their phone, clothes, shoes, coffee, etc... or what their bank has been investing their money in...

Lots of web based services have the same kind of spying as the unity lens thing - yet people accept it...

(But yes, I have to agree with all that...)

m.a.l.'s pa 09-17-2013 11:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by descendant_command (Post 5029061)
All your friends will point and laugh ...

That's pretty funny.

Quote:

Originally Posted by ilesterg (Post 5029050)
What reasons do I have NOT to use Ubuntu Linux as my desktop OS?

I don't know about you, but I haven't been able to come up with any reason why I shouldn't use Ubuntu... the LTS releases, at least. I don't like to bother with the non-LTS releases, though. Other than that, I don't see any disadvantages.

I run several distros here; Debian's my "primary," but all of them, including Ubuntu LTS, are fine. Whatever the distro, you can pretty much run any environment you want, turn off any default stuff you want to turn off, tweak it to your heart's desire.

TobiSGD 09-17-2013 11:32 AM

I can only tell you the reasons why I left Ubuntu after 2 years of using it:
1. General direction of Canonical's vision, with going away from the desktop OS and aiming at webservices (Ubuntu One, integration of Facebook and other social networks, ...)
2. Fixed release cycle. It took me some time to realize that the fixed release date is a serious issue. Ubuntu has to be released on that fixed day, no matter in which state the distribution is. This lead to bugs at release date that were mindboggling (like users of very widespread Intel videochips simply not being able to use it). Other bugs were not resolved for several releases. It seemed that Ubuntu simply had to few developers and that the general direction was "Add new features" when it should have been "Fix old bugs". You could see the consequences when Canonical released 12.04 LTS and explicitly recommended to the users of 10.04 LTS (so basically anyone who uses it in enterprise environments) not to upgrade until the first point release, admitting that they released their LTS version buggy and that they use their normal users as beta testers.
3. Too much automatism. At one point in my journey to learn Linux I came to the conclusion that the next step I have to learn is which automatisms are in Ubuntu and how to disable them, rather then concentrating on the topic I wanted to learn initially. It can be very confusing if you try to follow a tutorial on the web and while you are doing it some automagical wizard overwrites the config files you just changed.

This is why I changed to Debian (which fixed 1. and 2. completely and 3. partially) and ultimately to Slackware (fixed all three) as my desktop OS.

JWJones 09-17-2013 11:46 AM

Bloat. Spyware. Unity.

Having said that, a netinstall with a custom setup isn't bad.

m.a.l.'s pa 09-17-2013 11:48 AM

The point about the fixed release date is a good one. I do a fresh installation whenever the new LTS release comes out, and I tend to try to wait a while on that. If I can't wait, I know to expect that everything might not be absolutely perfect. Hasn't turned out to be a big deal for me, but it might be for others.

snowpine 09-17-2013 04:06 PM

Retracted. What's the point? :)

dugan 09-17-2013 05:13 PM

Their desktop typography is godawful. Their "Ubuntu" font looks like it's kerned all wrong.

(am I the only one who thinks this?)

ilesterg 09-17-2013 10:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TobiSGD (Post 5029295)
I can only tell you the reasons why I left Ubuntu after 2 years of using it:
1. General direction of Canonical's vision, with going away from the desktop OS and aiming at webservices (Ubuntu One, integration of Facebook and other social networks, ...)
2. Fixed release cycle. It took me some time to realize that the fixed release date is a serious issue. Ubuntu has to be released on that fixed day, no matter in which state the distribution is. This lead to bugs at release date that were mindboggling (like users of very widespread Intel videochips simply not being able to use it). Other bugs were not resolved for several releases. It seemed that Ubuntu simply had to few developers and that the general direction was "Add new features" when it should have been "Fix old bugs". You could see the consequences when Canonical released 12.04 LTS and explicitly recommended to the users of 10.04 LTS (so basically anyone who uses it in enterprise environments) not to upgrade until the first point release, admitting that they released their LTS version buggy and that they use their normal users as beta testers.
3. Too much automatism. At one point in my journey to learn Linux I came to the conclusion that the next step I have to learn is which automatisms are in Ubuntu and how to disable them, rather then concentrating on the topic I wanted to learn initially. It can be very confusing if you try to follow a tutorial on the web and while you are doing it some automagical wizard overwrites the config files you just changed.

This is why I changed to Debian (which fixed 1. and 2. completely and 3. partially) and ultimately to Slackware (fixed all three) as my desktop OS.

Interesting. Really interesting. Ubuntu was my first Linux distro, and I immediately got the impression that the company behind it has a goal other than the typical 'Open Source' idealogy. Apparently, they are headed to slowly monopolizing various Linux technologies.

m.a.l.'s pa 09-18-2013 12:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Randicus Draco Albus (Post 5029081)
Intended to start a flame-fest?

Hm.

Seems to me that with any Linux distro, there are some disadvantages and some reasons not to use it as your desktop OS. Are there similar threads about other distros here?

So what is the point of this thread? Only to elicit criticism of Ubuntu?

I heard lots of criticism about Linux, years ago, from supposedly knowledgeable people, when I was first thinking of trying Linux out. Came to find out that it was okay for me. Similarly, Ubuntu's supposed to be so awful, but for some strange reason it works out fine for many of us. And, believe it or not, some of us Ubuntu users actually know a thing or two about Linux and are quite capable of using any other distro. :rolleyes:

Might as well just install it (if you want to), use it for a while, and come to your own conclusions.


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