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Old 02-17-2010, 07:42 AM   #1
rovf
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KDE Clock settings in rc file


I have a question regarding the file

~/.kde/share/config/clock*rc

Could someone explain to me the meaning of the settings
Initial_TZ and RemoteZones, i.e. what values are permitted
and what is the effect of setting the values?

Background of this question:

I would like to have Clock showing another timezone than the local time (UTC). But when I use the "configure
timezone" menu entry of KDE Clock, I get only one choice,
i.e. UTC.

Looking at the clock*rc file, I found that it is set up
like this:

Initial_TZ=1
RemoteZones=UTC

My guess is that I need to add the desired timezone to
RemoteZones, but I'm not sure, and don't know the syntax.
I googled for this, but without success.
 
Old 02-17-2010, 09:00 AM   #2
smoker
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I don't run suse or KDE, but on my system, as root, I can run /usr/sbin/timeconfig which allows me to set whether the system uses UTC and lets me set the zone.

You could also try setting Initial_TZ=0 and RemoteZones=
You need to be root and kde must not be running for those settings to stick.

regards

Alan
 
Old 02-17-2010, 09:06 AM   #3
rovf
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Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by smoker View Post
I don't run suse or KDE, but on my system, as root, I can run /usr/sbin/timeconfig which allows me to set whether the system uses UTC and lets me set the zone.
First, I don't have the root password. Second, I'm perfectly happy that my *system* is using UTC. My question was about the time shown in the *KDE clock*.

Quote:
Originally Posted by smoker View Post
You could also try setting Initial_TZ=0 and RemoteZones=
But what, exactly, is the *meaning* of these settings?
Where are they documented?


Quote:
Originally Posted by smoker View Post
You need to be root and kde must not be running for those settings to stick.
Why do I need to be root? I am the owner of the file, and its permissions are 0600.

regards

Alan
 
Old 02-17-2010, 09:09 AM   #4
rovf
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Forgot to add: It's KDE 3.5.8 (in case this matters).
 
Old 02-17-2010, 09:38 AM   #5
smoker
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rovf View Post
First, I don't have the root password. Second, I'm perfectly happy that my *system* is using UTC. My question was about the time shown in the *KDE clock*.
the kde clock gets its settings from the system. To change system settings you must be root.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rovf View Post
But what, exactly, is the *meaning* of these settings?
Where are they documented?
The settings are gained from data supplied by the NTP server.


Quote:
Originally Posted by rovf View Post
Why do I need to be root? I am the owner of the file, and its permissions are 0600.
Because kde will reset the file to defaults when you exit/start kde.

I'm sorry I don't have all your answers, in fact I don't even run kde but those were the options I could find. Most people want their clocks set to local time. Whatever you do, you will have to disable the UTC option, which needs root privileges.

Maybe *you* could do some work now ...

Sorry I disturbed you.
 
Old 02-17-2010, 09:46 AM   #6
rovf
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smoker View Post
the kde clock gets its settings from the system. To change system settings you must be root.
And, I guess, settings here means also which timezones I am allowed to display? This is weird. If there is already the possibility for the user of selecting between timezones, why can't I configure which time I would like to see?

Quote:
Originally Posted by smoker View Post
The settings are gained from data supplied by the NTP server.
This is unlikely the reason, for
the NTP server only provides the time. From this, in principle, every time offset could be calculated.

Quote:
Originally Posted by smoker View Post
Because kde will reset the file to defaults when you exit/start kde.
Files in my own configuration directory? I had not expected this. So, it means I have to live with it :-/

Thanks for the explanation.
 
  


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