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Old 11-04-2007, 08:35 PM   #1
LouArnold
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Question Help: Screen res problem -Expert help.


We could use some help from an X11 expert to solve screen resolution problems.

There are a number of posts in many forums that claim a screen resolution problem after installation.They have to do with different monitors and different video cards.

In general, the screen resolution is provided only as 800x600 or 640x480.
Changing xorg.conf for addition modes and modelines has NO effect; GUI utilities do not list these other mode options. It would appear that the xorg.conf file is NOT read when the X server is restarted. So my questions are:
1) what files are used by the X11 system when the OS starts?
2) When root logs out, does that stop the X server ? When the log in screen again appears, does that indicate that the X server has started again?

There is also some evidence that the log-in screen may change resolution while the desktop does not change resolution. How is this possible?

I also wonder if the Display configuration utility (Menu System>Administration>Display) reads and/or alters files different from the screen resolution utility. (Menu System>Preferences>Screen Resolution).

In my case I have an old monitor - not on the list of monitors. It is probably seen as a Generic CRT monitor. The video card is onboard - an SIS730. It install as 800x600 at 60 Hz. My only other option is 640x480. (MsWindows allows 1024x768 16 bit color.)

Changing xorg.conf to add new modes and new mode lines for 1024, has no effect. I see no change in options for either display configuration or screen resolution.
 
Old 11-05-2007, 07:21 AM   #2
contusion
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See log of Xorg
/var/log/X.org.log
or posst it.

SFX: http://www.spreadfirefox.com/?q=affi...211983&t=1
 
Old 11-05-2007, 08:53 AM   #3
jiml8
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Quote:
1) what files are used by the X11 system when the OS starts?
If you mean "which config files are used... then that would be xorg.conf.

Quote:
2) When root logs out, does that stop the X server ? When the log in screen again appears, does that indicate that the X server has started again?
Depends on how you started X. If root logged in to a console, then executed a startx command (or an Xsession, or any distro-specific "let's start the X server command"), X will be stopped when root logs out of X. If (as is more common these days) X logins are handled by a display manager, then X won't be stopped when root logs out. The login screen means X is running, and that a display manager is controlling it.

You need to look at /var/log/Xorg.0.log
 
Old 11-06-2007, 03:52 PM   #4
LouArnold
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jiml8 View Post
If you mean "which config files are used... then that would be xorg.conf.



Depends on how you started X. If root logged in to a console, then executed a startx command (or an Xsession, or any distro-specific "let's start the X server command"), X will be stopped when root logs out of X. If (as is more common these days) X logins are handled by a display manager, then X won't be stopped when root logs out. The login screen means X is running, and that a display manager is controlling it.

You need to look at /var/log/Xorg.0.log
Ok, I'll be more concise.
I'm using Fedora 7 on a home computer. For the moment, I only work as root; there are no other users.

There are at least 3 files involved in this problem: xorg.conf to hold the possible resolution options, and two other file - one to hold the selected resolution for the login screen, and another to hold the selected resolution for the desktop. What is the path and filename for these two files?

Below is a brief (too long, I know) explanation of what I'm getting at.

When the system boots it briefly shows a textual logon prompt. Then it starts the X server (But how? Via startx?). When the server starts it must look at xorg.conf and another file with the desired screen resolution. [This file receives the setting from the Screen Resolution Preferences window (Menu>System>Preferences>Hardware>Screen Resolution) But the xorg.conf file is not altered in this process.] What is the path and filename for this file?

From another point of view:
When one wants to select a monitor and video card, one goes to Menu>System>Administration>Display, to get the Display Settings window comes up. It has the tabs at the top: Settings, Hardware, and Dual Head. If you select the Hardware tab, you can pick a Monitor Type and a Video Card. Whatever you pick determines the range of options you get on the Settings tab for (screen) Resolution and Color Depth. Once you click the OK button, a message appears saying that the settings will take effect when you restart the X server. The xorg.conf file is modified at this time for the selected monitor and video card. But another file must also be modified to change the resolution of the login GUI. What is this file?

Logging out from the desktop should stop the X server (Does it not?)
Linux will change to a text login screen and then soon restart X to show the graphical login screen. This screen is in the Display Settings selected resolution. It is not the resolution of the desktop, however; that must be changed through the Screen Resolution Preferences, discussed above.
 
Old 11-06-2007, 04:22 PM   #5
keratos
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Did you try:

dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg

as root?


Login manager:

Depending on distro, config files can be in slightly different locations.

For me, I use the GDM login manager and config files are in /etc/gdm/...

Last edited by keratos; 11-06-2007 at 04:27 PM.
 
Old 11-06-2007, 10:19 PM   #6
LouArnold
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Unhappy

Quote:
Originally Posted by keratos View Post
1) dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg......as root?

2) Login manager:
Depending on distro, config files can be in slightly different locations.
For me, I use the GDM login manager and config files are in /etc/gdm/...
(1) I'm using Yum with Fedora 7. Considering how many people have the same problem, I don't think a re-install of the X server will help. All updates have already been installed.

(2) I am using gdm as well. I looked in every file. I cannot see anything that would indicate a user selected screen resolution.
 
Old 11-06-2007, 11:37 PM   #7
LouArnold
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I found part of the answer: The selection made in the Screen Resolution Preferences dialog window (System>Preferences>Hardware>Screen Resolution) is placed into an xml file with this filespec:
/root/.gconf/desktop/gnome/screen/default/0/%gconf.xml
If you change between 800x600 and 640x480 screen resolution, time stamp and content in this file will change as per the selection. Somehow this setting is mapped to an option in the xorg.conf file.

Now the other end of this...where is the file that holds the screen resolution selected for the login GUI? This is selected by System>Administration>Display to get the Display Settings window.
 
Old 11-08-2007, 08:25 AM   #8
keratos
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You did not succeed in making your request clear, to to myself anyway.

Once logged in, I'm not sure you cna have a "global" desktop screen setting. Its set at the user level.

In terms of the login screen, if you are using GDM (Gnome Display Manager) login, then the files (as I said above) are in /etc/gdm.

The file /etc/gdm/gdm.conf has several sections starting [server-] like [server-Standard]. In these sections are a "command" lines. You need to add, to the end of the command lines, " -geometry 800x600" if for example you wanted 800x600 login screen.

This config file is for gdm only.

I have never tweaked this but believe you may need to execute "gdmflexiserver --command="UPDATE CONFIG <key>" for the X system to grab the manual updates to the file. Key is like "server-Standard/command".

In terms of your question "what are the X configuration files read" then this is not a trivial question and warrants a detailed response, more than I have the time or inclination to provide here. Why not purchase a book on the subject. If on the other hand you have SPECIFIC problems, then I'm sure you will find answers on a case by cases basis.
 
Old 11-08-2007, 07:56 PM   #9
LouArnold
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I didn't say that the screen resolution setting was global. The setting is for "root" since I logged in as root. This setting is in the file that I stated. The evidence is right there. I've verified that it changes when I select different resolutions.

The login screen - the one that everyone sees when they want to log in - must have a global setting. That setting has to be stored somewhere. The question is: Where?

There is no file gdm.conf in the folder /etc/gdm. You must have a different distro. This is an Fedora v7 OS with a Gnome desktop. However, there is a custom.conf file that clearly effects the login screen, but contains no resolution setting.

This is an important question for me because the log-in screen is never correctly displayed. Without knowing where that setting is stored, I can't tell what the server is trying to display and so I can't diagnose the problem.

Note that the desktop screen IS properly displayed, which makes the improper display of the login screen more of a mystery.

I'm not just interested in a method to a solution, because that may not help me next time, or other people that have a similar problem. I want to know WHAT is going wrong so I can stop blindly trying solutions.

Documentation on the X server doesn't go into where these settings are stored. Its probably to esoteric for most, so we (all of those with this problem) need an expert's help. At least the expert will be able to narrow down the field of possibilities.

Last edited by LouArnold; 11-08-2007 at 08:11 PM.
 
Old 11-09-2007, 03:23 AM   #10
keratos
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I have advised you as to WHAT is going wrong.

I do find your attitude and frustration not agreeable, if it continues I will vacate this thread and leave you to your own devices.

I am TRYING to assist you.

For the LAST TIME, you need to change the GDM login resolution by adding a "-geometry" command to the command that starts X in the GDM config scripts.

These are always in /etc/gdm. Names and format should not differ I would have thought. Examine the files looking for lines that execute/start X.

I dont use Fedora because of bugs like this !!!!! We ditched in in favour of ubuntu which I have to say is nowhere near as poor.

However, we are where we are, and you use Fedora.

Another option is to delete (comment!) the ModeLines from your /etc/X11/xorg.cong file that you DO NOT want X to use (i.e low resolution like 800x600 and 640x480 etc). This will force X not to use these resolutions. Generally this file should only contain resolutions you intend to use.

Once again, this is NOT and X problem. It is a GDM config issue however, the above fix will eliminate unnecessary resolutions and, as a side issue, may help you.

I dont know how Fedora names the GDM config files. I wouldnt have thought it should be different unless Fedora team have modified it.

Why not post that conf file in /etc/gdm you refer to above.
 
Old 11-09-2007, 02:33 PM   #11
LouArnold
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Keratos:
The fact that you are using Ubuntu explains a great deal. Simply put: what you suggest is not possible for me to carry out because the files and keywords you point me to do not exist. The two systems must be significantly different after all. And some of your suggestions just don't address the problem. Thank you for your time.

Last edited by LouArnold; 11-09-2007 at 03:50 PM.
 
Old 01-03-2008, 12:18 AM   #12
Drakeo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LouArnold View Post
We could use some help from an X11 expert to solve screen resolution problems.

There are a number of posts in many forums that claim a screen resolution problem after installation.They have to do with different monitors and different video cards.

In general, the screen resolution is provided only as 800x600 or 640x480.
Changing xorg.conf for addition modes and modelines has NO effect; GUI utilities do not list these other mode options. It would appear that the xorg.conf file is NOT read when the X server is restarted. So my questions are:
1) what files are used by the X11 system when the OS starts?
2) When root logs out, does that stop the X server ? When the log in screen again appears, does that indicate that the X server has started again?

There is also some evidence that the log-in screen may change resolution while the desktop does not change resolution. How is this possible?

I also wonder if the Display configuration utility (Menu System>Administration>Display) reads and/or alters files different from the screen resolution utility. (Menu System>Preferences>Screen Resolution).

In my case I have an old monitor - not on the list of monitors. It is probably seen as a Generic CRT monitor. The video card is onboard - an SIS730. It install as 800x600 at 60 Hz. My only other option is 640x480. (MsWindows allows 1024x768 16 bit color.)

Changing xorg.conf to add new modes and new mode lines for 1024, has no effect. I see no change in options for either display configuration or screen resolution.
let pretend you have slackware. at the root # type xorgconfig. there you will be asked question about your mouse key board and video card and monitor. the card is the old sis savage3 is a generic module in there you dont have to pic the card xorgcofig will find it. but if you know it for sure the chip sis then pic it out. the big issue is the monitor settings make sure you choose one that can do 1024X X768. if you have a old svga that can do 1024X768 then choose that. you will get it after you save to file then type starx if it fails then go back and tweak some more. after you done if your scroll mouse dosnt work then let us know.mouse is auto or ps2 etc etc.
 
Old 01-03-2008, 12:20 AM   #13
Drakeo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drakeo View Post
let pretend you have slackware. at the root # type xorgconfig. there you will be asked question about your mouse key board and video card and monitor. the card is the old sis savage3 is a generic module in there you dont have to pic the card xorgcofig will find it. but if you know it for sure the chip sis then pic it out. the big issue is the monitor settings make sure you choose one that can do 1024X X768. if you have a old svga that can do 1024X768 then choose that. you will get it after you save to file then type starx if it fails then go back and tweak some more. after you done if your scroll mouse dosnt work then let us know.mouse is auto or ps2 etc etc.
the config file is at /etc/x11/fileis xorg.conf
 
Old 01-03-2008, 12:28 AM   #14
Drakeo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LouArnold View Post
Ok, I'll be more concise.
I'm using Fedora 7 on a home computer. For the moment, I only work as root; there are no other users.

There are at least 3 files involved in this problem: xorg.conf to hold the possible resolution options, and two other file - one to hold the selected resolution for the login screen, and another to hold the selected resolution for the desktop. What is the path and filename for these two files?

Below is a brief (too long, I know) explanation of what I'm getting at.

When the system boots it briefly shows a textual logon prompt. Then it starts the X server (But how? Via startx?). When the server starts it must look at xorg.conf and another file with the desired screen resolution. [This file receives the setting from the Screen Resolution Preferences window (Menu>System>Preferences>Hardware>Screen Resolution) But the xorg.conf file is not altered in this process.] What is the path and filename for this file?

From another point of view:
When one wants to select a monitor and video card, one goes to Menu>System>Administration>Display, to get the Display Settings window comes up. It has the tabs at the top: Settings, Hardware, and Dual Head. If you select the Hardware tab, you can pick a Monitor Type and a Video Card. Whatever you pick determines the range of options you get on the Settings tab for (screen) Resolution and Color Depth. Once you click the OK button, a message appears saying that the settings will take effect when you restart the X server. The xorg.conf file is modified at this time for the selected monitor and video card. But another file must also be modified to change the resolution of the login GUI. What is this file?

Logging out from the desktop should stop the X server (Does it not?)
Linux will change to a text login screen and then soon restart X to show the graphical login screen. This screen is in the Display Settings selected resolution. It is not the resolution of the desktop, however; that must be changed through the Screen Resolution Preferences, discussed above.
file path is /etc/X11/ your -xorg.conf file
 
Old 06-07-2009, 09:33 AM   #15
leilton
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Thumbs down screen resolution

Fairly new to this forum,until three days ago using SUSE, but on advice of expert changed to Unbutu. Big mistake,

Have tried, admittedly to my own low ability, to get out of the 1600x1200 res. only thing you see on screen is the header panel. I need to set res.to 1024x768, yes know there is a section under preferences,but when I do this I get a screen full of nothing,unless you call flashing bits of screen an improvement.

Also, can I ask,how do you install a menu master on the desktop?

Should it help, I am using this on my old Fujitsu Siemens AMILO Pro, prior to using another os on my main system
 
  


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