LinuxQuestions.org
LinuxAnswers - the LQ Linux tutorial section.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - General > Linux - Certification
User Name
Password
Linux - Certification This forum is for the discussion of all topics relating to Linux certification.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 04-23-2005, 02:52 AM   #1
krunal
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Posts: 14

Rep: Reputation: 0
RHCE or LPI?


Hi,

I am planning to do certification in linux. RHCE and LPI are the two choices i am considering.

Please tell me when these certifications expire and their industry value.
 
Old 04-23-2005, 03:02 AM   #2
musicman_ace
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2001
Location: Indiana
Distribution: Gentoo, Debian, RHEL, Slack
Posts: 1,555

Rep: Reputation: 46
LPI requests that you re-certify every 10 years. Your credential isn't expired, but it showns an non-active after the 10 years.

I'd recommend LPI as it tests on Linux in general.

Last edited by musicman_ace; 04-25-2005 at 04:49 AM.
 
Old 04-23-2005, 03:32 AM   #3
krunal
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Posts: 14

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
In terms of course contents, RHCE is equivalent to LPI 1 or LPI 2 ?

If i am not wrong, is the cost of LPI 1 200$ (100$/exam) and same for LPI 2 ?
 
Old 04-23-2005, 05:41 AM   #4
musicman_ace
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2001
Location: Indiana
Distribution: Gentoo, Debian, RHEL, Slack
Posts: 1,555

Rep: Reputation: 46
I've not taken the RHCE, but I imagine content wise they are similar.
But you also have to look at "what is the company he interviews for hates redhat?". At my job, I could care less if you can build/ install RPMs, kickstart a load, or use any other redhat tool. Since I moved here, I've gotten rid of the mandrake/redhat boxes and used slackware for most things, but since I began gentoo, I've since used it instead.
Having an RHCE really wouldn't help. Yeah, you now about linux but you'd go looking for all the configs in /etc/sysconfig and then come back to me saying "I can' find this file ". Then I'd educate said person that redhat moves or links all config there so that drones can operate the machine sort of like windows.

This is all personal opinion, you can get any and all certs you like. My vote goes for LPI

: edit :
Yes, I used to be a redhat fan long ago (7.3). I understand they have a good product, but I disagree with their attitude

Last edited by musicman_ace; 04-23-2005 at 05:46 AM.
 
Old 04-24-2005, 09:21 AM   #5
tietack
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Posts: 75

Rep: Reputation: 15
Well, nominally, LPI level 2 covers a "similar" level of material as RHCE; however, the analogy is closer to:

Taking a multiple choice test on War and Peace - is to LPI (a difficult multiple choice exam)

as

Scoring a 70 on the Pebble Beach golf course with no more than a 38 on front or back 9 - is to RHCE (And you have to par the first 5 holes) (a challenging test of your skills in real life)
 
Old 04-25-2005, 12:25 AM   #6
krunal
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Posts: 14

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
That means, first LPI level 1 then LPI level 2 which is equivalent to RHCE.

Why not take RHCE directly?

Also, please tell me about expiry of RHCE?

And throw some more light on which certification has more market value (in terms of ease of getting a good job) ?
 
Old 04-25-2005, 04:46 AM   #7
musicman_ace
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2001
Location: Indiana
Distribution: Gentoo, Debian, RHEL, Slack
Posts: 1,555

Rep: Reputation: 46
Quote:
Originally posted by krunal

And throw some more light on which certification has more market value (in terms of ease of getting a good job) ?
** I'm not saying that you are one of these people, but don't think certs mean you can get a job.**

This is one that I have to deal with. Just because someone has certifications doesn't mean that they know anything. These people are known as "Paper MCSEs", fill in whatever cert you like. Someone who can memorize the answer, either from a book or cheetsheet, and pass the test but once they get hired I have to fix their errors. As I stated, it will depend of if the company you are looking into uses Redhat or a separate distribution. LPI covers a broader base since it deals with debian package management, Redhat package management, compiling from source, and the .tgz which is slackware's I think.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Quote:
5minutes searching redhat.com

19. For how long will my RHCE certification be considered current?
While evidence suggests that RHCEs who stay professionally active can evolve their skills in pace with new releases of Red Hat Linux OS technology, it is important for Red Hat to maintain a policy for determining whether an RHCE or RHCT certificate can be considered current. Thus, verification services provided for all RHCEs at Certification Central have always included which version a certificate was earned on, and whether the certificate is considered current or no longer current.

The validity period for all RHCEs and RHCTs is now officially pegged to the release of the Enterprise product commercially available at the time certification was earned, and certification shall be current until after one (1) major release of the Enterprise product. Certificates earned on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 will be current until the release of Red Hat Enterprise 5.

All RHCEs earned on Red Hat Linux 7.3 or prior will be considered current until the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4. All RHCEs and RHCTs earned on Red Hat Linux 8.0 and 9 will remain current until the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. Validity and current status of an RHCE certificate will continue to be verified at Certification Central.
 
Old 04-27-2005, 02:28 AM   #8
krunal
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2005
Posts: 14

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
** I'm not saying that you are one of these people, but don't think certs mean you can get a job.**


I understand that getting a certificate does not necessarily get you a job.
What i meant was that is it something like that a particular edition of linix(redhat or others) is more popular in the industry. That may help me decide.


I too have read the above information on expiry of RHCE from redhat.com. What i did not understand is will the certificate have no value after the next major release of redhat.
 
Old 04-27-2005, 04:13 PM   #9
musicman_ace
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2001
Location: Indiana
Distribution: Gentoo, Debian, RHEL, Slack
Posts: 1,555

Rep: Reputation: 46
Microsoft retired the NT line of certs, but many companies still use NT4. All the MCSE's I know still put the NT certs in their resume, it would look something like this

Windows NT4 MCSE
Windows 2000 MCSA (let just say he hasn't gotten that far)
70-290 Windows 2k3 server

That would let the employer know that he can break any NT4 system, most 2000 systems, and the new 2003 server if they let him touch the machine.
Any cert is better than no cert, so try to look at what the exams cover and pick the one which covers the broadest area. Possibly your employer will send you back for most certs once you get the job.
 
Old 05-12-2005, 05:57 AM   #10
galbotrix
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2005
Location: Mumbai, India
Distribution: Open SUSE, FC 4, Ubuntu 5.10
Posts: 7

Rep: Reputation: 0
My strategy

I'd recommend a combination of LPIC 1 a vendor independant certification + NCLP (Novell Cert Linux Prof) a vendor dependant but similar certification to start with. You may then proceed to LPIC 2 or NCLE 9 as you progress in knowledge and experience. And finally to the real hardcore LPIC 3 to test your guts.
 
Old 05-12-2005, 07:10 AM   #11
ravee
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: India
Distribution: Fedora Core 2
Posts: 83

Rep: Reputation: 15
Certifications are used to get your resume selected by the HRD in the firm you are applying. You still have to convince them in the technical interview that you are the right guy for the job to get the job. So don't fret over which certification to get. RHCE and LPI are both good.
And I have seen atleast quite a few RHCE's and LPI's in Job ads in newspapers.
 
Old 05-21-2005, 08:52 PM   #12
ninjaz
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Michigan
Distribution: RHEL v.4, Debian
Posts: 82

Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally posted by musicman_ace
** I'm not saying that you are one of these people, but don't think certs mean you can get a job.**

This is one that I have to deal with. Just because someone has certifications doesn't mean that they know anything. These people are known as "Paper MCSEs", fill in whatever cert you like. Someone who can memorize the answer, either from a book or cheetsheet, and pass the test but once they get hired I have to fix their errors. As I stated, it will depend of if the company you are looking into uses Redhat or a separate distribution. LPI covers a broader base since it deals with debian package management, Redhat package management, compiling from source, and the .tgz which is slackware's I think.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
How much experience are we talking about here? I have been jumping around from college to college and I have a lot of help desk experience. Right now I have about 5 years of help desk experience, a few summers doing port mapping and a little rewiring of patch panels at various companies, and a lot of on site computer work and troubleshooting. I'm hoping to get my Network+, CCNA, and some kind of Linux certificate whether it be LPI/RHCT or RHCE. Is this enough to my foot in the door of a good company?
 
Old 05-22-2005, 12:19 AM   #13
musicman_ace
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2001
Location: Indiana
Distribution: Gentoo, Debian, RHEL, Slack
Posts: 1,555

Rep: Reputation: 46
Probably as a help desk technician. Certs are often thought of as a requirement for a Server or Infrastructure team. Web Design / Application teams that we have don't need anything more than a two year degree and a portfolio of sites they've designed.
 
Old 05-22-2005, 08:40 AM   #14
ninjaz
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Michigan
Distribution: RHEL v.4, Debian
Posts: 82

Rep: Reputation: 15
Yeah, thats the type of job that I'm going after is some type of network admin position, but I'm still in college trying to go after my IT degree. What I'm wonder is, is what kind of qualifications, certifications, and job experiences do companies look for when they hire someone freash out of college?
 
Old 05-22-2005, 09:21 AM   #15
musicman_ace
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2001
Location: Indiana
Distribution: Gentoo, Debian, RHEL, Slack
Posts: 1,555

Rep: Reputation: 46
I'd say your good to go fresh out of college with your degree and a certification or two for applying for help desk stuff. Now markets are going to vary, so I don't know what its really like in your area.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
LPI question? angel115 Linux - Newbie 2 10-03-2005 11:58 AM
LPI level2 Fraudulent Linux - Certification 11 07-18-2005 08:08 PM
Lpi loadedmind Linux - Certification 5 04-16-2004 03:19 PM
LPI Certification ferreter Linux - General 3 02-20-2003 04:17 PM
LPI level 1 subnet_rx Linux - General 1 11-16-2001 06:07 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:35 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration