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Old 10-17-2012, 11:13 AM   #16
custangro
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Quote:
Originally Posted by red.hive View Post
Hi custangro,

Some news: from what I am told here in this forum and others, the network card problem that I have cannot be solved if I continue to use the trial version of RHEL. I was advised to either move to centos or buy a RHEL license.

Since I will have to re-install the system (probably using centos), can you tell me if there is anything I can do different in the installation process to make the dual boot with two separate drives work without needing to go to the BIOS every time to change boot order?

Thanks in advance,

red.hive
After installing CentOS...follow this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m0VW9w8F53I

--C
 
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Old 10-17-2012, 04:49 PM   #17
red.hive
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million thanks!

I also found a solution for ubuntu's grub which you might like, someone in the ubuntu forum told me about it: install os-prober, run it and then run update-grub - it adds the extra system to the grub menu.

I will also follow the youtube video you sent me and let you know, very grateful for your help!

red.hive
 
Old 10-20-2012, 03:20 PM   #18
red.hive
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I watched the video and the solution I found before on an Ubuntu forum is actually ok, even without doing what the video says, reason: when the video was done, Ubuntu didn't recognize LVM volumes - now it does, you only need to use os-prober and update-grub that it works. OS is successfully added to Ubuntu's grub.

BTW, I finally decided to go with CentOS :-)

I still have a question though, regarding the dual boot. If I remember correctly, at some point in the book (or exam objectives), you are expected to interrupt the booting to study how to configure grub before it boots, and also to overcome password and selinux issues - since with dual boot it is booting with Ubuntu's grub, how will I be able to study that? Perhaps from inside the KVMs that I am still to build? What do you think?

Thanks again,

red.hive
 
Old 10-21-2012, 02:58 PM   #19
custangro
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Quote:
Originally Posted by red.hive View Post
I watched the video and the solution I found before on an Ubuntu forum is actually ok, even without doing what the video says, reason: when the video was done, Ubuntu didn't recognize LVM volumes - now it does, you only need to use os-prober and update-grub that it works. OS is successfully added to Ubuntu's grub.

BTW, I finally decided to go with CentOS :-)

I still have a question though, regarding the dual boot. If I remember correctly, at some point in the book (or exam objectives), you are expected to interrupt the booting to study how to configure grub before it boots, and also to overcome password and selinux issues - since with dual boot it is booting with Ubuntu's grub, how will I be able to study that? Perhaps from inside the KVMs that I am still to build? What do you think?

Thanks again,

red.hive
You are only using the Physical machines to run KVM...not to study. Do all your studying on the KVM Guests; not on the hardware.

HTH

--C
 
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Old 10-22-2012, 01:39 AM   #20
red.hive
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Good point, I am yet to install the KVM machines, but hope I will be doing it very very soon! Thanks!
 
Old 10-25-2012, 11:58 PM   #21
digigold
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I recently took my RHCSA exam. What Mike said is right on. CentOS & Scientific 6.x would work fine, but avoid Fedora. Fedora could confuse you as it has implemented things like SystemD, which is not in RHEL. Also when using CentOS & Scientific make sure that the "Extra Packages" repo are disabled. Good luck.
 
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Old 10-26-2012, 04:46 AM   #22
red.hive
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Hi digigold,

Thanks for the input - why do you think it is better to disable the extra packages repo?

Also - may I ask how long you studied for the exam and how many years of experience you have? It always helps to hear others' experiences, so thanks again.

red.hive
 
Old 10-26-2012, 12:33 PM   #23
digigold
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Quote:
Originally Posted by red.hive View Post
Hi digigold,
Thanks for the input - why do you think it is better to disable the extra packages repo?
Also - may I ask how long you studied for the exam and how many years of experience you have? It always helps to hear others' experiences, so thanks again.
red.hive
You want to disable epel because the "extra packages" are (mostly) not supported by RedHat; therefore, not part of the test.

I got sent to the "FastTrack" class, which is basicaly a double-paced class for four days and then the test. I have been a SysAdmin for years, but originaly a...gaagh...Windows Admin....rhetch, heave.

The class would be pretty pricey if you have to pay privately and if your a competent, experienced linux admin, it's probably not necessary. That said the class was well designed and instructed. I would recommend it to anyone that desires a refresher. The exam is so much better at gauging ones' skillset than say Linux+, LPIC and the likes which I thought were more memorization, and much, much easier. I feel like the RH Certs actually mean something, but I guess that's just MHO...anyways good luck to ya!
 
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Old 10-27-2012, 11:51 AM   #24
red.hive
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hi digigold - very interesting! i agree with you that the red hat certs stand on different ground when comparing to the other certs in the field - that's why we hear so many scare stories about how hard it is to pass - congrats for doing it!
 
Old 11-01-2012, 10:39 PM   #25
sundialsvcs
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Personally, I've never had any trouble with the idea of just giving Red Hat their honest due. They've always been very up-front about their corporate revenue model, and wise in the way that they spent it. If you're going for one of their certifications, I would suggest that to pony-up the money for one of their licenses is simply a professional-education expense. (In the US, you can certainly deduct it as-such on your tax return.)

Could you do their work on CentOS-6? Yeah, maybe. But I'd honestly be inclined to think that you'd be missing the point. Their training-program is undoubtedly going to be fairly product-specific, as one would of course expect it to be. "Pony up, then write it off."

Last edited by sundialsvcs; 11-01-2012 at 10:41 PM.
 
Old 11-02-2012, 11:08 AM   #26
custangro
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Originally Posted by sundialsvcs View Post
Personally, I've never had any trouble with the idea of just giving Red Hat their honest due. They've always been very up-front about their corporate revenue model, and wise in the way that they spent it. If you're going for one of their certifications, I would suggest that to pony-up the money for one of their licenses is simply a professional-education expense. (In the US, you can certainly deduct it as-such on your tax return.)

Could you do their work on CentOS-6? Yeah, maybe. But I'd honestly be inclined to think that you'd be missing the point. Their training-program is undoubtedly going to be fairly product-specific, as one would of course expect it to be. "Pony up, then write it off."
^ There is a thing to be said about this. Very valid point.

PLUS; you're going to spend $ on a book, $ on a computer to practice on, then $ for the test. Another $180 for a licence isn't all bad.

Always remember: "You think education is expensive? Try ignorance..."
 
Old 11-16-2012, 10:52 AM   #27
runtime_error
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Hi all,

Having been to the Red Hat Training and the Exam (RH300), I can tell you:

1. Per my instructor, Red Hat is free. The subscription and/or support is what you are paying for after the trial expires. Therefore there is no reason not to use RHEL for study.

2. As others have said, the DVD can be used as the repository.

3. The only software you need is included on the Red Hat media.

4. For driver problems, stick with the HCL and you will be fine. A VMware virtual machine may be your best bet to host your environment.

-Saul
 
Old 01-18-2013, 03:26 PM   #28
bowecho
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Quick question. I have been toying around with the idea of paying for a subscription to RHEL, however I am not completely sure which subscription I'd need to cover everything for the RHCSA and later the RHCE.

With CentOS, I installed the basic environment and have installed both desktop and server components I've needed through their repos. Unlike CentOS, RedHat seems to be separated out by Desktop, Workstation and Server. Does this mean a Workstation installation cannot install packages for a server?

Custangro mentioned a subscription is only $180. That is for Workstation. The cheapest Server price is $349. Can I get away with everything I need from a Workstation subscription? Will I still get all server functionality and server packages from the repos, just no support? Workstation says maximum virtualized guests is 1, the cheapest server subscription says 1 virtual guest. I'm guessing this means I could only have 1 RHEL VM running on my physical RHEL installation.

Thanks!

Edit: In the meantime, I think I'll install the 30 day trial server and use the DVD as the repo, until I decide on (or save up enough for) a subscription.

Last edited by bowecho; 01-18-2013 at 04:02 PM.
 
Old 01-19-2013, 02:13 PM   #29
stef80
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Every once in a while somebody asks: "Is it worth spending XYZ $ on a RHEL licence to prepare for the exam?". Short answer is ... NO. Why buy when you can download it for free from Red Hat? Register for trial license and download ISOs. Trial license will not limit you in any way since you _do_not_need_ RHN access to prepare for the exam. You need local repo, which you can create from ISO itself.

Burn money on books and equipment. Build your home RHCSA/RHCE lab ... on KVM.
 
Old 01-19-2013, 04:13 PM   #30
bowecho
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Now that I have downloaded and installed the trial and have been working through the RHCSA material, I now understand there is no need at all for a subscription. I'm not running a production system, so I don't need support or updates. I wasn't sure before if the trial was crippled in any way, however it definitely is not. Its the real thing. I have my local repo working, several RHEL KVM VMs that I'm playing with (right now toying with how much can actually be done in a kickstart file, pretty fun) and all is well.

So far I have seen several differences between CentOS and RHEL, mostly cosmetic. Still glad I'm running what will actual be used in the exam. I'm thinking I'll probably be up until 4AM tonight studying the materials like last night. Might sound crazy, but I am enjoying it. My workplace is a 100% windows shop, but linux has been a hobby of mine since I was in high school in the 90s. Figured in my free time I'd try for a certification. Could help down the line, who knows.

Thanks all!
 
  


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