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gardenair 01-13-2013 10:52 AM

Gentoo iso file for installation ?
 
hi,
I want to install a linux base system on my Desktop PC to learn Linux not any distro. I choose Gentoo Linux.To download the latest version for ISO image I click on http://distfiles.gentoo.org/releases...s/current-iso/

Here I see few iso file links and some tar.bz2 extention. Kindly guide me that which one I chhose to download or there is a need to download all files in a specific way and then make an iso file ? It is a new thing for me please guide me.

2-If you sent me a link from where i download the iso file then it will be easy for me to burn the cd/dvd.

Note:- I am using Intel base system with 1 Giga Processor with 512 MB ram,80 GB Hard Disk

thanks.
gardenair

TobiSGD 01-13-2013 11:04 AM

The Gentoo handbook explains it all: http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/handbook/handbook-x86.xml

TB0ne 01-13-2013 11:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gardenair (Post 4869008)
hi,
I want to install a linux base system on my Desktop PC to learn Linux not any distro. I choose Gentoo Linux.To download the latest version for ISO image I click on http://distfiles.gentoo.org/releases...s/current-iso/

Here I see few iso file links and some tar.bz2 extention. Kindly guide me that which one I chhose to download or there is a need to download all files in a specific way and then make an iso file ? It is a new thing for me please guide me.

2-If you sent me a link from where i download the iso file then it will be easy for me to burn the cd/dvd.

You've been registered here for NINE years...from your other threads, you've installed Slackware and Debian, but now need help downloading a file??? And you need us to spoon-feed you a link? Here's some easy steps:
  • Go to the Gentoo site
  • Click Download
  • You'll see a list of processor types...next to each is a link that says "ISO".
  • Click whichever link matches your processor type
  • Then, look at that screen...it'll have a file named <something>.ISO. Amazingly, the file named ISO is the ISO file.
  • Click it.
Quote:

Note:- I am using Intel base system with 1 Giga Processor with 512 MB ram,80 GB Hard Disk
Saying "Intel system" doesn't tell us anything, since Intel makes both 32 bit and 64 bit CPU's. And with only 512MB of RAM, and (presumably) a 32bit CPU, your system is going to be fairly slow.

cchildress 01-25-2013 12:07 AM

You'll typically want to use the install-<arch>-minimal iso. You don't technically have to though; I've found it's a lot easier to PXE boot a live Debian terminal and install Gentoo from that.
The Gentoo handbook that TobiSGD does a very good job of explaining the install procedure.

Emerson 01-26-2013 06:13 PM

First. Your hardware seems rather weak for compiling. Expect long (I mean long, long) compiling times.
Second. Nothing from the install media will become a part of your installation. Feel free to use any Linux liveCD you already have or get one of popular rescue distros for installation, like SystemRescueCd, GRML or Knoppix. Generally these distros have much better hardware support than Gentoo install CD.

bloody 02-25-2013 07:41 PM

I remember those days when i maintained Gentoo on a 1.3 GHz machine, desperately using a second (1 GHz) box with distcc to reduce these compile times...

Expect a package like glibc to take at least 6-8 hours to compile on a 1 GHz machine. Yes, just that one package. Likewise with gcc, the kernel, firefox, thunderbird, QT/KDE stuff and a couple more, although most other packages are rather small and won't take very long. But then, there are hundreds of packages..

On a really fast machine, glibc builds in 15 minutes (or even less), which is where the real fun with Gentoo starts. But all the love for Gentoo won't get me again to install it on a machine which is that old. No problem with any other distro (1 GHz / 512 MB is still just fine), but a source-based one won't be much fun in the long run.

darthaxul 03-06-2013 06:25 AM

hard-wear
 
with your rig looking into sabayon may make things a lot quicker to setup

Emerson 03-06-2013 05:28 PM

I still see no reason to replace my aging laptop, IBM T23 (it does everything I need it for). Runs Gentoo - the only 32-bit OS in my household, when upgrading I force lower CPU frequency (don't want to give hard time to this veteran) and run distcc in pump mode. Compile times are reasonable.

darthaxul 03-08-2013 09:08 PM

you could try lowering optimization pipe flags in your make.conf I read it may speed up compile times but the executable will not be as fast

bloody 03-10-2013 09:11 AM

Optimization pipe flags? Has nothing to do with option -pipe btw (which can always be used to save write times). But yes, you could use -O1 or -O0 to speed up compiling, and -g0 to avoid debug infos being created in the first place when it's stripped afterwards anyhow. But still, Gentoo isn't much fun on an old solo machine if you're not having a second (faster) box to help out via distcc. Just that one machine might be fun for a couple of days but in the long run it gets annoying..

ShadowCat8 03-22-2013 02:04 PM

Greetings,

Quick question in regards to this: Is there no real difference with the -Os flag from say, -O1?

I thought -Os was supposed to be optimized for size as well, which on an older system *should* translate to some boost in speed, right? Probably not a remarkable increase, but a noticable one.

Or am I mistaken?

TIA.

bloody 03-25-2013 05:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ShadowCat8 (Post 4916646)
I thought -Os was supposed to be optimized for size as well, which on an older system *should* translate to some boost in speed, right? Probably not a remarkable increase, but a noticable one.
Or am I mistaken?

-Os does what it says, it creates a small executable, for low-memory settings, i.e., embedded stuff and the like, while -O1 might already implement optimizations which don't produce the smallest code but might well be faster than code generated with -Os. Although you'll probably very rarely ever note any difference except maybe one or two things like some video codec or stuff like that, but only if you really use a stopwatch to measure.

i92guboj 03-26-2013 07:04 AM

What any of those so-called optimization level does depends on many things, particularly the architecture. The difference between -O1 and -Os can be negligible in some settings, and very important in some others. The recommended setting is -O2, unless you-know-what-you're-doing (TM), and then you wouldn't be asking this at all. ;)

mreff555 05-06-2013 04:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Emerson (Post 4878206)
First. Your hardware seems rather weak for compiling. Expect long (I mean long, long) compiling times.
Second. Nothing from the install media will become a part of your installation. Feel free to use any Linux liveCD you already have or get one of popular rescue distros for installation, like SystemRescueCd, GRML or Knoppix. Generally these distros have much better hardware support than Gentoo install CD.

It can be done. I've installed gentoo on a 750MHz with 256MB of ram. Compilation was very slow and a good amount of swap space is required for compiling, but it works.

bloody 05-18-2013 09:21 AM

It might work, but will it be fun on that machine?


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