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Old 08-29-2005, 02:44 PM   #1
Cinematography
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Why do some always suggest the most difficult distros?


Slackware, Gentoo, Crux, Ubuntu.... wtf...

Converting and learning new programs is already hard enough. It was even hard for me and I've been using computers for almost 20 years now. But spending extra months just to learn the operating system before you can run your programs... I really don't see the point in this, nor do most of us have the time. For a newbie, or for anyone really, it would probably be better to suggest something with automation, and that doesn't take like a week to install. It's better to learn by taking baby steps, and not by getting dumped by the whole damn thing at once. They can seek "control" and "purity" on their own after they become more familiar with how Linux works.

Last edited by Cinematography; 08-29-2005 at 02:48 PM.
 
Old 08-29-2005, 02:49 PM   #2
kencaz
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Too each his own. It really boils down to how one deals with stress... If the know that water is cold do you jump in anyway and get it overwith or wade in and prolong the misary...

I am the jump right in type (as far as computers go) so I would naturally suggest the same...

KC
 
Old 08-29-2005, 03:00 PM   #3
geeman2.0
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I agree with your gripe.
Even with 3 years of UNIX based education I would of been fairly lost without automatic config tools (read: GUI based) when I first started with linux at home.

Newbies (especially windows converts) should start with something that more resembles windows, and then as they mature they can move into a more sophisticated distro.

I die a little inside everytime someone recommends gentoo to a linux neophite. What better way to scare away a newbie sending him off to spend a week installing his basic set of desktop tools. (Disclaimer: I love gentoo now, but I would of hated it as a newbie )

I started with Fedora Core. I hate it now, but I loved it back then
 
Old 08-29-2005, 03:03 PM   #4
Cinematography
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Quote:
Originally posted by kencaz
Too each his own. It really boils down to how one deals with stress... If the know that water is cold do you jump in anyway and get it overwith or wade in and prolong the misary...

I am the jump right in type (as far as computers go) so I would naturally suggest the same...

KC
If you knew you had to drive 3 hours to another city to visit someone, why would you waste time building a car if you could just get a car that was already made? Using Slackware, Ubuntu, etc are like using cars that you have to push. With my 10hr per day work schedule, I have zero time for this. I was misled by so many people during my 3 month search for the "perfect" distro. Everyone kept suggesting Slackware and Ubuntu. None of them asked me if I felt like "building my distro", or made me aware of easier distros. I had to go through about 9 distros before I found Kanotix.
 
Old 08-29-2005, 03:10 PM   #5
Cinematography
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Quote:
Originally posted by geeman2.0
[B]Newbies (especially windows converts) should start with something that more resembles windows, and then as they mature they can move into a more sophisticated distro.
Or at least something with automation. KDE and Gnome are very nice GUIs. Anyone with a basic understanding of how GUIs work will be able to catch on to them. And after they get an understanding of automated operating system like Suse or Mepis, then they could consider moving on to Slackware, Gentoo, or Ubuntu if they wanted more control and/or speed. Suggesting a distro like Slackware to a newbie is like giving someone who hasn't even taken pre-Algebra a Calculus book. It's just not fair or considerate.
 
Old 08-29-2005, 03:16 PM   #6
Nylex
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I wouldn't recommend Slack to a newbie, although it does rule . I thought Ubuntu was meant to be easy to use, at least that's what I've heard :/.
 
Old 08-29-2005, 03:17 PM   #7
phil.d.g
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Buying a car with only the basic options is fine for that 3 hour journey, but when I spend all day every day driving I would like a few extras - maybe sports seats for better back support, air conditioning, cd player. In the same way something like Ubuntu or Fedora Core would be OK for occassional use, but as I use my machine for hours at a time I would like it to be a bit more tailored to my needs so I can justify spending a few more hours at install time to install slackware and get it configured exactly how I need/want it for a better experience when doing my work that will make me more productive and give me more confidence in the system
 
Old 08-29-2005, 03:18 PM   #8
phil.d.g
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Quote:
Originally posted by Nylex
I wouldn't recommend Slack to a newbie, although it does rule . I thought Ubuntu was meant to be easy to use, at least that's what I've heard :/.
I have used Ubuntu briefly and in my opinion it is easier to use than FC, Mandrive or SUSE
 
Old 08-29-2005, 03:24 PM   #9
Cinematography
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Quote:
Originally posted by Nylex
I wouldn't recommend Slack to a newbie, although it does rule . I thought Ubuntu was meant to be easy to use, at least that's what I've heard :/.
I've been using Linux for about 3 months now. I've been trying it on and off for about 7 years though, since Suse 6.2. After I get more familar with the basics, I might give Slackware another try.

Quote:
Originally posted by phil.d.g
I have used Ubuntu briefly and in my opinion it is easier to use than FC, Mandrive or SUSE
Ubuntu is missing so much. I even wrote a tutorial on all that I had to do to it just to get basic stuff going.
http://ubuntuforums.org/showpost.php...79&postcount=1

It's a nice distro. It's just not for me though.
 
Old 08-29-2005, 03:27 PM   #10
mrcheeks
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I though you were done with the distro switching stuff and that you were happy with ubuntu? Lots of your threads looks like complains, a guy crying and angry at the same time. I hope someday, your signature will be more like : i reached nirvana

If you have a problem with a distro lots of people are willing to help you i believe.

Sure, it is posted in general, and sure fits here, but is it a useful thread like the daily "favorite distro", "which one to choose"?

You don't have to know everything about the distro you use... Some stuff is useless, there are lots of things in linux that i don't really care about like lots of basic stuff or ... kernel internals.

Everyone has a different opinion about the distro stuff. As for myself i always say start with fedora, mandrake or the kind. Still it is just my opinion.

You know everybody like james bond from kids to grandma. You could say yes, no or look for james bond on the web to see what it is about....

Some newbies find slackware great to begin, it is just another opinion and you can see for yourself if you think you could share that opinion :
*by getting more info on the distro site
*by installing the distro, if you think you could like it
 
Old 08-29-2005, 03:27 PM   #11
aysiu
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I think the real problem is that we should never make assumptions about where new users are at. I hate it when people just make unilateral recommendations. Slackware is not for everyone. Ubuntu is not for everyone. Linspire is not for everyone. Mepis is not for everyone. SuSE is not for everyone.

There is no distro that is for everyone and suits every newbie's needs. Believe it or not, some newbies do want a challenge and want to build everything up from scratch. Some newbies have modest specifications. Some newbies want a multiple-CD distro. Some newbies want a single-CD distro.

I encourage people to take quizzes and do research. I use Mepis and Ubuntu because those are the ones that work for me, but I would never just recommend them flatout to anyone.
 
Old 08-29-2005, 03:33 PM   #12
Nylex
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Quote:
Originally posted by Cinematography
I've been using Linux for about 3 months now. I've been trying it on and off for about 7 years though, since Suse 6.2. After I get more familar with the basics, I might give Slackware another try.
I think I've been using Linux properly for something like 2-3 months also. I had been trying it on and off as well, although I never tried SuSE (I used Red Hat, Mandrake, Fedora, Slackware and eventually tried Debian for a few days, but didn't like it). Anyway, as long as you're comfortable with the distro you use, that's cool .
 
Old 08-29-2005, 03:34 PM   #13
BROse
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Just because you own a computer does that mean you should? Hay, take the time to enjoy the ride....
 
Old 08-29-2005, 03:35 PM   #14
Cinematography
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Quote:
Originally posted by mrcheeks
I though you were done with the distro switching stuff and that you were happy with ubuntu?
Nah. Ubuntu was nice, but... grrr... Not my cup of tea.

Quote:
Lots of your threads looks like complains
They are. I went through a lot of crap to get to where I am now.

Quote:
I hope someday, your signature will be more like : i reached nirvana
Oh, I'm pretty content with my current distro. Mepis was great! I just switched to Kanotix because it uses a newer KDE and doesn't have the bugs that annoyed me.

Quote:
If you have a problem with a distro lots of people are willing to help you i believe.
Very true. That's why I love this forum. You've been a great teacher also. Thank you again for your help!

Quote:
Some newbies find slackware great to begin
Because they're either programmers or super geniuses!
 
Old 08-29-2005, 04:17 PM   #15
phil.d.g
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Most distro's including Slackware are reasonably easy to install and configure provided your willing to put the time in and read the documentation and have a bit of patience.
 
  


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