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Old 12-11-2012, 08:09 AM   #1
devUnix
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Registered: Oct 2010
Location: Bengaluru, India
Distribution: RHEL 5.1 on My PC, & SunOS / Sun Solaris, RHEL, SuSe, Debian, FreeBSD and other Linux flavors @ Work
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What Linux Distro are You Using at Your Workplace?


Hi All,


As we know that there is a variety of Linux distributions such as Suse, Debian, CentOS, Red Hat, to name a few. What distribution are you using at an enterprise level viz. in your organisation?

I have worked with different companies and have seen SOLARIS (UNIX) and Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and CentOS Linux mostly.

If I can make use of my existing knowledge of Red Hat / CentOS then which one should I try my hands on: OpenSUSE or Debian?

Saludos!

Dev.
 
Old 12-11-2012, 08:24 AM   #2
tronayne
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Questions: Want something rock solid, dependable, stable? Work with Solaris? Want a Linux distribution that looks and feels a whole lot like Solaris? Don't want to be bothered with weekly barrages of "updates" that make you wonder what the heck somebody was thinking? Want a server that will run for months without any attention; well, maybe a patch or two?

Answer: Slackware.

Hope this helps some.
 
Old 12-11-2012, 08:37 AM   #3
devUnix
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Registered: Oct 2010
Location: Bengaluru, India
Distribution: RHEL 5.1 on My PC, & SunOS / Sun Solaris, RHEL, SuSe, Debian, FreeBSD and other Linux flavors @ Work
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tronayne View Post
Questions: Want something rock solid, dependable, stable? Work with Solaris? Want a Linux distribution that looks and feels a whole lot like Solaris? Don't want to be bothered with weekly barrages of "updates" that make you wonder what the heck somebody was thinking? Want a server that will run for months without any attention; well, maybe a patch or two?

Answer: Slackware.

Hope this helps some.
Thanks for your comments and suggestions! I appreciate your views on SOLARIS.
 
Old 12-11-2012, 08:52 AM   #4
johnsfine
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Our Linux servers run Centos, Red Hat or Suse. Centos is the best and easiest of those (the cost of paid license Linux is insignificant, but the inconvenience during install and/or reconfiguration is significant). Unfortunately corporate policies are not necessarily sensible and require paid licenses for many types of server. Otherwise, we would have just Centos.

There are also some Linux work stations in the organization. I know those include Fedora. I'm not sure what else. Corporate IT has procedures in place to block any local (per office) IT flexibility in Windows workstations or Linux servers. They haven't yet taken the effort necessary to block local IT flexibility on Linux workstations.
 
Old 12-11-2012, 08:56 AM   #5
devUnix
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Registered: Oct 2010
Location: Bengaluru, India
Distribution: RHEL 5.1 on My PC, & SunOS / Sun Solaris, RHEL, SuSe, Debian, FreeBSD and other Linux flavors @ Work
Posts: 557

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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnsfine View Post
Our Linux servers run Centos, Red Hat or Suse. Centos is the best and easiest of those (the cost of paid license Linux is insignificant, but the inconvenience during install and/or reconfiguration is significant). Unfortunately corporate policies are not necessarily sensible and require paid licenses for many types of server. Otherwise, we would have just Centos.

There are also some Linux work stations in the organization. I know those include Fedora. I'm not sure what else. Corporate IT has procedures in place to block any local (per office) IT flexibility in Windows workstations or Linux servers. They haven't yet taken the effort necessary to block local IT flexibility on Linux workstations.
Great point to be noted down: "Corporate Policies"! Thanks!
 
  


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