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Old 03-05-2012, 12:24 PM   #91
k3lt01
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In response to the non directed post above that was prompted by another thread.

http://thyroid.about.com/od/newscont...muchiodine.htm

Quote:
"The Iodine Controversy"
The New England Journal of Medicine published research from China that looks at the relationship between iodine intake and thyroid disease. Reporting in the June of 2006 issue, the researchers concluded that "more than adequate or excessive iodine intake may lead to hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroiditis."

These findings were accompanied by an editorial by Dr. Robert Utiger, who said that "the small risks of chronic iodine excess are outweighed by the substantial hazards of iodine deficiency," adding to the controversy over iodine, in particular, the iodization of salt, and iodine supplementation,

Iodine Deficiency
On one side of the controversy is the serious issue of iodine deficiency. Iodine is obtained through food, water, iodized salt, and supplementation. The thyroid uses iodine to produce thyroid hormone, making iodine an essential, necessary nutrient.

Iodine is particularly critical for pregnant women and fetuses, as well as young children. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), an estimated 2 billion people, including 285 million school-age children, are iodine deficient. And among them, iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) affect some 740 million -- with almost 50 million of them suffer from some form of brain damage resulting from the iodine deficiency.

According to the International Council for the Control of Iodine Deficiency Disorders (INCCIDD):

Iodine deficiency is the single most common cause of preventable mental retardation and brain damage in the world. It also decreases child survival, causes goiters, and impairs growth and development. Iodine deficiency disorders in pregnant women causes miscarriages, stillbirths, and other complications. Children with IDD can grow up stunted, apathetic, mentally retarded, and incapable of normal movements, speech, or hearing.

There are many areas of the world where iodine deficiency is a severe health crisis. The INCCIDD has a map online that shows iodine nutrition worldwide. This map reveals that while most areas of the Western Hemisphere tend to be sufficient in iodine, Europe, Russia, Asia, Australia and Africa, have areas at varying risk of deficiency.

Iodine Excess
On the other side of the controversy is the recognition that excessive iodine can trigger autoimmune thyroid disease and hypothyroidism.


According to animal studies, high iodine intake can initiate and worsen infiltration of the thyroid by lymphocytes. Lymphocytes are white blood cells that accumulate due to chronic injury or irritation. In addition, large amounts of iodine block the thyroid's ability to make hormone.

In this New England Journal study, researchers, led by Dr. Weiping Teng, of China Medical University in Shenyang, looked at the thyroid effects of giving supplemental to three separate groups: people who were mildly iodine-deficient, those with adequate iodine intake, and those with excessive iodine intake. They found that giving iodine to people who had adequate or excessive iodine intake could lead to hypothyroidism autoimmune thyroiditis.

In the study, researchers found that the primary risk factors for continuing subclinical hypothyroidism included:

TSH above 6
High levels of antithyroid antibody (thyroid peroxidase antibody or thyroglobulin antibody)
A shift in iodine intake from mildly deficient to more than adequate

They also found that the key risk factors for new subclinical hypothyroidism in people who started with normal thyroid function included:

TSH level greater than 2
High antithyroid antibody levels
A shift in iodine intake from mildly deficient to more than adequate, or excessive iodine intake

The researchers concluded:

...although iodine supplementation should be implemented to prevent and treat iodine-deficiency disorders, supplementation should be maintained at a safe level. Levels that are more than adequate (median urinary iodine excretion, 200 to 299 µg per liter) or excessive (median urinary iodine excretion, >300 µg per liter) do not appear to be safe, especially for susceptible populations with either potential autoimmune thyroid diseases or iodine deficiency. Supplementation programs should be tailored to the particular region. No iodine supplementation should be provided for regions in which iodine intake is sufficient, whereas salt in regions in which iodine intake is deficient should be supplemented with iodine according to the degree of iodine deficiency.
Quote:
But, unless you are planning to get pregnant, are currently pregnant or you're breastfeeding, you'll want to be very careful about taking iodine unless you and your practitioner have some very strong evidence that you are deficient. If your practitioner recommends iodine supplementation as a thyroid treatment, you may wish to ask for a more specific test that can measure iodine levels -- the "urinary excretion" test. This test which evaluates the iodine excreted in the urine, and gives an indirect but fairly accurate assessment of iodine levels, and can document deficiency.
http://www.thyroid.org/patients/pati...eficiency.html

Quote:
Are there problems with taking too much iodine?
Taking too much iodine can also cause problems. This is especially true in individuals that already have thyroid problems, such as nodules, hyperthyroidism and autoimmune thyroid disease. Administration of large amounts of iodine through medications (ie Amiodarone), radiology procedures (iodinated intravenous dye) and dietary excess (Dulce, kelp) can cause or worsen hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism.

In addition, individuals who move from an iodine-deficient region (for example, parts of Europe) to a region with adequate iodine intake (for example, the United States) may also develop thyroid problems since their thyroids have become very good at taking up and using small amounts of iodine. In particular, these patients may develop iodine-induced hyperthyroidism (see Hyperthyroidism brochure).
http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?t...trient&dbid=69

Quote:
However, in certain circumstances, excessive consumption of iodine can actually inhibit the synthesis of thyroid hormones, thereby leading to the development of goiter (enlargement of the thyroid gland) and hypothyroidism. Excessive iodine intake may also cause hyperthyroidism, thyroid papillary cancer, and/or iodermia (a serious skin reaction).

In an attempt to prevent these symptoms of iodine toxicity, the Institute of Medicine established the following Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (TUL) for iodine:

1-3 years: 900 mcg
4-8 years: 300 mcg
9-13 years: 600 mcg
14-18 years: 900 mcg
19 years and older: 1,100 mcg
Pregnant women 14-18 years: 900 mcg
Pregnant women 19 years and older: 1,100 mcg
Lactating women 14-18 years: 900 mcg
Lactating women 19 years and older: 1,100 mcg

It is important to note that if you have an autoimmune thyroid disease (for example, Grave's disease or Hashimoto's disease) or if you have experienced an iodine deficiency at some point in your life, you may be more susceptible to the dangers of excessive iodine consumption, and may, therefore, need to monitor your intake of iodine more carefully.
http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/iodine12345/

Quote:
Should I test my iodine levels before supplementing with it? Yes. It’s often advised to order an Iodine Loading Test, which is easy enough to do in your own home. You then send back your specimen, and wait for the results. These results can be important in revealing whether you might need to supplement or not. Some have chosen to do an iodine patch test on the skin, but results vary so widely that the loading test is the preferred and most accurate determination.
Quote:
–> Iodine and the autoimmune Hashimotos: Patients have reported an aggravation of their Hashimotos symptoms after using iodine. In fact, some European and Asian countries have an explosion of Hashimoto’s cases due to immense iodine supplementation in food. On the other side the coin, certain studies and intelligent analysis report that autoimmune problems associated with iodine use actually are the result of low selenium levels, as well as low copper or low zinc. This underscores the need for supporting nutrients. To read interesting details about the association between the aggravation of Hashimotos and the rise of antibodies, go here. Part II is here.-
http://www.sensible-alternative.com....hyroid-article

Quote:
Common Causes of Thyroid problems

Why is thyroid disease so common? Like many other hormone imbalances, under-active thyroid is due, in part, to our modern lifestyle. Causes include:

Autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto's) is the most common reason for under-active thyroid. In this condition, the immune system attacks the thyroid gland, and it also as interferes with the action of thyroid hormone in the body. Thyroid hormone tablets are not adequate treatment. The immune problem must also be addressed. Thyroid autoimmunity affects 1 in 4 women. It is the result of environmental toxins and widespread vitamin D deficiency. It is also caused by wheat gluten, which has been shown to be a trigger for Hashimoto's(8) (See Autoimmune article.)
Selenium deficiency (a serious problem in Australia due to low soil levels). Selenium is necessary for the conversion of T4 to T3. (Incomplete conversion results in high levels of reverse T3, an inactive hormone.) Selenium has also been shown to reduce autoimmunity against the thyroid (ie. to treat the underlying cause of Hashimoto's thyroid disease.) (9)
Oestrogen dominance caused by stress and pollution. Oestrogen suppresses thyroid function.
Environmental toxins affecting the thyroid gland, such as mercury (10), bromine, chlorine, fluoride, PCBs and others. According to new research presented at the American Thyroid Association meeting, "environmental factors account for about 30% of the risk for autoimmune thyroid disease". (11) Of concern are certain pharmaceutical medications, cigarette smoking, stress, selenium deficiency, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and bisphenol A (BPA).
Adrenal insufficiency. A deficiency in the adrenal hormones DHEA or cortisol is a common underlying issue in thyroid disorders. If it is not corrected, patients may find that they cannot tolerate thyroid replacement treatment. Cortisol deficiency may suppress TSH. Read about Low Blood Pressure Syndrome for more information on adrenal insufficiency.
Iodine deficiency. Deficiency is very common in Australia. Get your iodine level checked with a urine test, and then use a proper iodine supplement, not kelp. Kelp is not effective because it also contains bromine which inhibits thyroid function. Hashimoto's patients should use iodine with caution, as large doses may aggravate your condition. That said, if an iodine deficiency has been established with a urine test, then a small dose of iodine is certainly indicated, even in Hashimoto's patients. Iodine is not the solution for every thyroid problem, but a deficiency should be corrected. If not for the thyroid alone, then for the other tissues, such as brain, breasts and uterus, that require iodine. If the iodine deficiency is not corrected, then the body will harvest iodine from the thyroid hormone medication.
Iron deficiency
http://www.vitalhealthzone.com/nutri.../iodine.html#9

Quote:
CAUTIONS

People taking lithium carbonate for manic depressive illness should NOT take iodine as it suppresses the thyroid gland and can produce abnormally low thyroid activity.

Be careful when taking extra iodine supplements as excessive amounts can cause hyperthyroidism, a condition where the thyroid overreacts and this can cause another set of problems.
Please note, these articles do not come from one source.
 
Old 03-07-2012, 10:12 AM   #92
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Lots of very low quality sources.

The only exception is that other halogens do affect the thyroid, mostly bromine, but also chlorine and fluoride.

Iodine is essential for normal thyroid function, and is in no way the direct cause of hyperthyroidism.

There are two cases in which it can trigger thyrotoxicosis, both of them are manifested as goiter.

One is goiter caused by Iodine deficiency. Lots of colloid / thyroglobulin is produced and stored, but cannot be converted to T3 and T4, because there is no Iodine. This causes the goiter in this case.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thyroid

The second is autoimmune, usually post-viral.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2654877/#
In this case the anomaly is caused by viruses or autoimmune reactions. A similar over-production of colloid occurs and when Iodine in added, it can cause thyrotoxicosis.

If it were a real threat, they would stop iodizing salt. In the qualities they put in salt and supplements, it is unlikely to cause thyrotoxicosis, although it can't be ruled out.

I would also like to add that I have not given any bad advice, and that you are the one who have given bad advice. You have a disease, and you look for it in others as well, yet you don't understand it. I'm sure you would ban all iodine, and then I suppose everyone would have goiter, right ?

I think you have completely overreacted on this subject, and I will try to find and report all your offensive posts.
 
Old 03-07-2012, 11:34 AM   #93
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Oh Boy!!!! You two still arguing about thyroid and iodine? Do we have a certified medical practitioner who can take charge and explain?
 
Old 03-07-2012, 11:37 AM   #94
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linuxlover.chaitanya View Post
Oh Boy!!!! You two still arguing about thyroid and iodine? Do we have a certified medical practitioner who can take charge and explain?
That would be nice.
 
Old 03-07-2012, 11:42 AM   #95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by H_TeXMeX_H View Post
That would be nice.
Then he would have to give a "proof" that he's indeed
a medical practitioner, and on the top of that we'll
have to "prove" that his "proof" is valid!
 
Old 03-07-2012, 12:40 PM   #96
k3lt01
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Quote:
Originally Posted by H_TeXMeX_H View Post
Lots of very low quality sources.
Says someone who uses wikipedia 99% of the time. My sources are from, and have references named, sources that are verifiable. If you truly believe thyroid.org is a low quality source then there is a problem.

Yes I have a thyroid condition, no I don't look for it in others. What I do look for is proof of what people are saying. You never give any except for wikipedia and even then people have to ask for it. You make statements like k3lt01 is on my block list yet you reply to everything, and my new favourite "I don't like posting in General" yet you have a phenomenal amount of posts in General. You have now started a thread about General and even suggested shutting it down. I have read a post from you saying people shouldn't let their children have certain vaccines and you then go on a scare campaign about it. I find this to be very concerning, this isn't just about thyroid or iodine, it is about your actual posts and assumed knowledge.

My questions for you would be, considering you are a medical expert with many courses to your credit, what is your real issue with people seeing doctors? what is your problem with using sources other than wikipedia if you have such sources at your disposal why don't you use them? Why do you make such open statements like "don't take any notice of him etc etc etc" trying to indicate you are the leading expert on anything medical? We have no idea about your qualifications and you are giving advice which I have shown, with credible resources that also state iodine is an important trace element needed for proper functioning of the body, is fundamentally flawed. I don't even know why you are saying I would ban iodine, I know it is needed, but I also know to much is just as bad as not enough and I also know you need more than just iodine for it to be taken up and this is something you have not mentioned. So please if you state something at least give us, without anyone having to ask, some credible medical (not just wikipedia) evidence for your theory. Otherwise someone like me is easily going to be able to show the other side of the equation (to which you will ultimately claim is from very bad sources).

Last edited by k3lt01; 03-07-2012 at 12:49 PM.
 
Old 03-07-2012, 12:51 PM   #97
k3lt01
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
Then he would have to give a "proof" that he's indeed
a medical practitioner, and on the top of that we'll
have to "prove" that his "proof" is valid!
I haven't claimed I have medical expertise. I'm just someone who can think for myself and is able to locate sources than do not originate at wikipedia.
 
Old 03-07-2012, 02:01 PM   #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
Then he would have to give a "proof" that he's indeed
a medical practitioner, and on the top of that we'll
have to "prove" that his "proof" is valid!
Yeah, so it's best to take advice from someone in real life ...
 
Old 03-07-2012, 02:05 PM   #99
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You posted a very small quote from thyroid.org, but I agree with everything posted on there. It is a good resource. Read the entire page if you want to understand it tho. It mentions clearly "large quantities".

Last edited by H_TeXMeX_H; 03-07-2012 at 02:06 PM.
 
Old 03-07-2012, 07:20 PM   #100
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As I have said before in this thread there are things you post and the links you post to support you don't actually agree with you.

If you know anything about the human body you would know there is a limit to how much iodine it actually needs, taking iodine supplements (not as in iodised salt but in supplements like tablets the same as taking iron tablets, you also mentioned iron) you would realise without knowing the current level of iodine intake is 1 worthless as it wont help anything at all because it cannot be used or 2 it is dangerous because it can cause other undesired side effects. Advising someone to take anything without knowing what their current levels are is something I would expect a layman to do and that is because they have no idea about what they are talking about or 2 a medical professional who is having a bad day or doesn't know what they are talking about.

"Large quantities" as you should know take in what is already part of the individuals dietary intake. You have no idea what someones dietary intake is unless you ask about it, forgive me if I missed that post but even with my glasses (which I don't need with a computer) on I cannot find it.

Let me ask you, do you really believe the New England Journal of Medicine is a low quality source? What do you have to say about the highlighted sections in that article? do you refute them totally? are you really saying they are wrong and you are right?
 
Old 03-08-2012, 11:54 PM   #101
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anisha Kaul View Post
Then he would have to give a "proof" that he's indeed
a medical practitioner, and on the top of that we'll
have to "prove" that his "proof" is valid!
Yes you indeed need to make sure that someone who called himself a doctor is actually a one in real life. And I think a doctor would be able to explain things with much better effect, and in details without actually taking the help of Wikipedia. No one can become a doctor or medical practitioner by just reading online sources. If this would become true, there would be no medical institutes and everyone on this earth would add Dr. to their name.
And if his/her knowledge still does not make you sure, you can ask for certificates as well.

But a better idea would be to visit a Hospital near you.
 
Old 03-09-2012, 01:02 AM   #102
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linuxlover.chaitanya View Post
Yes you indeed need to make sure that someone who called himself a doctor is actually a one in real life. And I think a doctor would be able to explain things with much better effect, and in details without actually taking the help of Wikipedia. No one can become a doctor or medical practitioner by just reading online sources. If this would become true, there would be no medical institutes and everyone on this earth would add Dr. to their name.
And if his/her knowledge still does not make you sure, you can ask for certificates as well.

But a better idea would be to visit a Hospital near you.
Quote:
Originally Posted by H_TeXMeX_H
We finally know the truth.

It has been said many times in many places, you'd be nuts to take advice on medicines or medical issues from people on an online forum. You don't know them and they don't know you or your situation. You are much better off going to see a real doctor in person so they can talk to you about your medical history, family history, take tests and monitor the situation. Not only that, they can give you good advice on what to do because they are actually qualified and licensed.

I have said my piece and made my point.
Live long and prosper
 
Old 03-09-2012, 01:21 AM   #103
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Exactly, LinuxQuestions.org is not a place where jeremy expects doctors to come around and help others with their medical issues. Even though this is a /General forum, it would be nice if we ourselves prevented from helping others on medical conditions when we are not Doctors ourselves. And Anisha did not start this thread to ask advice for her medical condition. On the contrary she wanted to know what kind of doctor she should be seeing for her medical condition. The thread went far too off topic.
 
Old 03-15-2012, 06:35 AM   #104
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linuxlover.chaitanya View Post
And if his/her knowledge still does not make you sure, you can ask for certificates as well.
I think if I try this where I live, I'll be shown the door!
 
  


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