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newbiesforever 04-26-2013 12:37 PM

what is a -5 power connector?
 
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I'm going to buy a power supply tester to see whether my five-year-old power supply is anywhere near failure (though I've seen no obvious signs). Some testers mention that, by design, they do not light up for the -5 connector (because it apparently has been phased out). What does a -5 connector look like?--I googled it but couldn't find a picture (the search results were giving me pictures of different cables and connectors), and don't know whether my motherboard has one.

(There is a stock photo of my board; I hope it's helpful.) All I know is that -5 is not the smaller, square white connector to the upper left of the CPU, because that one says +5 on the board, not -5.
Is -5 part of the larger, rectangular cable connection to the right of the RAM slots? I shined my flashlight around it for a -5 marking (looking on the board, because that's where the +5 for the other cable is), but didn't see one (though it may be covered by all the cables). Finally I shut everything down (was trying to avoid doing that) to examine the cables. It's been so long since I unplugged the motherboard power cables that I'd forgotten this one was two separate cables in the same port. I guess the larger one can't be -5, because it's labeled +20; what about the smaller one (same size and shape as the +5 connector)? I can't read what it says, because the paint is partly obliterated, but it has a three-letter word, not numbers.

smallpond 04-26-2013 02:24 PM

-5V does not have a separate connector, it is part of the old ATX power connector and not supplied on the new ones. See this pic:

http://pcpowersupply.files.wordpress...ply-pinout.jpg

newbiesforever 04-26-2013 04:35 PM

Yes, but I have the 20-pin connector with a four-pin connector that is separate but plugs into the same port. My motherboard dates back to 2008.

rknichols 04-26-2013 08:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by newbiesforever (Post 4939579)
Yes, but I have the 20-pin connector with a four-pin connector that is separate but plugs into the same port. My motherboard dates back to 2008.

Then your motherboard has a 24-pin connector and does not use -5V. The power supply is provided with what is called a "20+4" connector, allowing it to be used with either a 20-pin or 24-pin motherboard, and probably does provide -5V on pin 18 of its 20-pin connector (which would mate with the unused pin 20 of the motherboard's 24-pin connector).

newbiesforever 04-26-2013 08:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rknichols (Post 4939672)
Then your motherboard has a 24-pin connector and does not use -5V. The power supply is provided with what is called a "20+4" connector, allowing it to be used with either a 20-pin or 24-pin motherboard, and probably does provide -5V on pin 18 of its 20-pin connector (which would mate with the unused pin 20 of the motherboard's 24-pin connector).

Thank you; that's what I needed to know.

teckk 04-28-2013 11:05 AM

http://www.hardwarebook.info/Category:Connector
http://www.hardwarebook.info/ATX_12V_Power_Supply
http://www.hardwarebook.info/ATX_Power_Supply
http://www.hardwarebook.info/ATX_v2.2_Power_Supply
http://www.hardwarebook.info/ATX_Optional_Power
http://www.hardwarebook.info/ATX_Aux_Power_Supply

http://www.hardwarebook.info/IDE_Internal
http://www.hardwarebook.info/Serial_ATA
http://www.hardwarebook.info/ATA_Internal
http://www.hardwarebook.info/Universal_Serial_Bus_(USB)


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