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Old 04-03-2004, 07:49 AM   #16
graffitici
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Registered: Jun 2003
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Hi seidren,

It's good to hear that you got admitted to a place you wanted. I haven't been posting anything on this thread, but I was following it very meticulously. Why? Because I also have applied to US universities in order to study "Electrical and Computer Engineering" and "Computer Science".

Another interesting fact is that one of my friends too has been accepted from VirginiaTech. I do not know if he has visited the place yet, but I'll ask him.

On my part, I got accepted to Brown, Duke, Carnegie-Mellon, WPI and MichiganTech, and still waiting an answer from Princeton (I'm not hopeful though). Can anybody who knows the universities give me some directions about which one to choose? I think Worcester Polytechnic might be the more reasonable choice?

Good Luck!
BB

Last edited by graffitici; 04-03-2004 at 07:52 AM.
 
Old 04-03-2004, 07:53 AM   #17
LinuXP
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Not another Techie! Just kidding . Good luck down at Tech, I know a few people there.

I don't go to Tech, but here's a page where you find some AMD Athlon laptops in any case.
 
Old 04-03-2004, 07:57 AM   #18
LinuXP
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Quote:
Originally posted by graffitici
Hi seidren,

It's good to hear that you got admitted to a place you wanted. I haven't been posting anything on this thread, but I was following it very meticulously. Why? Because I also have applied to US universities in order to study "Electrical and Computer Engineering" and "Computer Science".

Another interesting fact is that one of my friends too has been accepted from VirginiaTech. I do not know if he has visited the place yet, but I'll ask him.

On my part, I got accepted to Brown, Duke, Carnegie-Mellon, WPI and MichiganTech, and still waiting an answer from Princeton (I'm not hopeful though). Can anybody who knows the universities give me some directions about which one to choose? I think Worcester Polytechnic might be the more reasonable choice?

Good Luck!
BB
Out of all of those, I would say that Carnegie-Mellon is the probably the best choice for a technical university. I'm guessing that you wouldn't qualify for in-state tuition for any of those that might be public universities, so in that case, there wouldn't be too significant of a difference in tuition between a public and a private institution.
 
Old 04-03-2004, 11:07 AM   #19
jailbait
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"I am hoping to get a reply from a VT student on this forum."

Both I and my sister graduated from Virginia Tech.

------------------------
Steve Stites
Class of 66
 
Old 04-03-2004, 08:01 PM   #20
vincebs
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If you are short on money you can go to a Canadian university. Tuition is rarely over US$8000 /year even for international students. The University of Waterloo is known nationally for its engineering programs.

Try:
www.uwaterloo.ca (University of Waterloo)
www.utoronto.ca (University of Toronto)

I wouldn't be concerned that these universities are in Canada and not in the U.S. Canadian culture is the same as the U.S. so I wouldn't worry about missing out on "American life". Toronto, the center of a metropolitan area of 6.5 million, is only 1.5 hours drive from Buffalo, New York. And the temperatures in Toronto are rarely more than 3 degrees Celsius colder than Boston, MA (Harvard, MIT) so if you are going to a cold city anyway, why not save some bucks and go to U of T?
 
Old 04-03-2004, 08:10 PM   #21
seidren
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Wow! glad to hear that !!!
One silly question for you jailbait, is it really cold there?
I live in a very hot country and I think getting used to a cold one would be a tough challenge.

Quote:
Originally posted by LinuXP
I'm guessing that you wouldn't qualify for in-state tuition for any of those that might be public universities, so in that case, there wouldn't be too significant of a difference in tuition between a public and a private institution.
It is possible to qualify for in-state tuition fees. Atleast for the second or third year. One of my friends has done it in New York. So I guess that will not be a problem, as far as I can pay for the first year. And I am hoping to apply for loans and scholarships and do some part time job to cover most of the expenses. Hopefully it will all go smooth.
 
Old 04-03-2004, 10:38 PM   #22
jailbait
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"One silly question for you jailbait, is it really cold there?
I live in a very hot country and I think getting used to a cold one would be a tough challenge."

I lived for two years in northern Thailand which has a climate similar to Sri Lanka. The temperature is relatively constant all year round. The two seasons are the dry season and the monsoon. For seven months there is not a cloud in the sky. Then for five months is rains continuously.

Virginia is a temperate climate. It rains or snows at erratic times all year round. The coldest time of the year is January. The temperature gradually rises to reach its hottest point in July. Then the temperature gradually cools to the January lows. When the temperature is below 0 (all temperatures are Centigrade although the U.S. actually uses Fahrenheit) it snows instead of raining. From about May 1 to about September 30 the temperature is about the same as what you would experience in Sri Lanka. During January and February the average temperature is about 4. The coldest temperature you will see at Virginia Tech is about -8 on a very cold day. The average temperature during July and August is about 30. The highest temperature that you will see at Virginia Tech is about 40 on an extremely hot day.

When it snows the ratio of snow to rain is about 12 to 1. If a storm would rain 1 centimeter then it will snow 12 centimeters if the temperature is below 0. The combination of rain and the temperature being below 0 results in about 30 to 60 centimeters of snow a winter at Blacksburg. When it snows the snow will melt in a week or so whenever the temperature climbs back above 0. The day to day temperature varience is greater in the temperate zone than in the tropics.

If you arrive here in September then you will not need any jacket or coat immediately. You can buy winter clothing in Blacksburg. There is no need to try to bring it from Sri Lanka.

Buildings in the temperate zone are not open to the weather like buildings in the tropics. A combination of heating and air conditioning keeps all buildings at about 21 degrees all year round. Similarly for automobiles. Personally I like the heating but dispense with the air conditioning whenever I can.

Yes getting used to the cold can be a challenge. I moved from Thailand to Toronto, Canada on January 2, 1970. My first week in Toronto the highest temperature was -17. I shivered so much while waiting for buses that I had back spasms. Within a few years my favorite recreation was hunting in the Canadian boreal forests in the dead of winter.



---------------------------------
Steve Stites
 
Old 04-04-2004, 03:50 PM   #23
vincebs
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Quote:
Originally posted by jailbait

Yes getting used to the cold can be a challenge. I moved from Thailand to Toronto, Canada on January 2, 1970. My first week in Toronto the highest temperature was -17. I shivered so much while waiting for buses that I had back spasms. Within a few years my favorite recreation was hunting in the Canadian boreal forests in the dead of winter.
---------------------------------
Steve Stites
That's cold, even for Canada. The average high in January is -1 C here. It can get as low as -24 and as high as +12 in January. In July highs are around 27 degrees and often up to 34 degrees.
 
  


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