LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Non-*NIX Forums > General
User Name
Password
General This forum is for non-technical general discussion which can include both Linux and non-Linux topics. Have fun!

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 04-03-2014, 11:15 AM   #1
jamison20000e
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: infinity; (randomly born:) Milwaukee, WI, US, Earth
Distribution: any UNIXish that works well on my cheapest with mostly KDE, Xfce, JWM or CLI but open ;-)
Posts: 1,362
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 358Reputation: 358Reputation: 358Reputation: 358
Cool "Wanna Build a ...? NASA’s About to Give Away a Mountain of Its Code"


Cool: http://www.wired.com/2014/04/nasa-gu...mbid=social_fb
Quote:
Forty years after Apollo 11 landed on the moon, NASA open sourced the software code that ran the guidance systems on the lunar module.

By that time, the code was little more than a novelty. But in recent years, the space agency has built all sorts of other software that is still on the cutting edge. And as it turns out, like the Apollo 11 code, much of this NASA software is available for public use, meaning anyone can download it and run it and adapt it for free. You can even use it in commercial products.

But don’t take our word for it. Next Thursday, NASA will release a master list of software projects it has cooked up over the years. This is more than just stuff than runs on a personal computer. Think robots and cryogenic systems and climate simulators. There’s even code for running rocket guidance systems.

This NASA software catalog will list more than 1,000 projects, and it will show you how to actually obtain the code you want. The idea to help hackers and entrepreneurs push these ideas in new directions — and help them dream up new ideas. Some code is only available to certain people — the rocket guidance system, for instance — but if you can get it, you can use it without paying royalties or copyright fees. Within a few weeks of publishing the list, NASA says, it will also offer a searchable database of projects, and then, by next year, it will host the actual software code in its own online repository, ...
Yay NASA!
 
Old 04-03-2014, 02:11 PM   #2
John VV
Guru
 
Registered: Aug 2005
Posts: 12,956

Rep: Reputation: 1722Reputation: 1722Reputation: 1722Reputation: 1722Reputation: 1722Reputation: 1722Reputation: 1722Reputation: 1722Reputation: 1722Reputation: 1722Reputation: 1722
this has been up for a few years already

http://code.nasa.gov/project/
 
Old 04-03-2014, 02:23 PM   #3
jamison20000e
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: infinity; (randomly born:) Milwaukee, WI, US, Earth
Distribution: any UNIXish that works well on my cheapest with mostly KDE, Xfce, JWM or CLI but open ;-)
Posts: 1,362
Blog Entries: 2

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 358Reputation: 358Reputation: 358Reputation: 358
Cool.
I've only been toying as a hobbyist with Ruby, on and off, for a few years now. No time.

It makes sense NASA (like opining sources) is smart and it's about to expand (at lest the free code.)
 
Old 04-04-2014, 12:34 AM   #4
kooru
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2012
Location: Italy
Distribution: Slackware, NetBSD
Posts: 1,323
Blog Entries: 5

Rep: Reputation: 261Reputation: 261Reputation: 261
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamison20000e View Post
Cool..I've only been toying as a hobbyist with Ruby
Great Ruby!
 
Old 04-04-2014, 12:44 AM   #5
jamison20000e
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: infinity; (randomly born:) Milwaukee, WI, US, Earth
Distribution: any UNIXish that works well on my cheapest with mostly KDE, Xfce, JWM or CLI but open ;-)
Posts: 1,362
Blog Entries: 2

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 358Reputation: 358Reputation: 358Reputation: 358
I should really make time!
 
Old 04-04-2014, 09:27 AM   #6
sundialsvcs
Guru
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: SE Tennessee, USA
Distribution: Gentoo, LFS
Posts: 5,382

Rep: Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109
There basically wasn't any software on those systems that (supposedly ...) went to the moon. Ostensibly, they did it with slide rules.
 
Old 04-04-2014, 10:35 AM   #7
Spect73
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2013
Distribution: Slackware 14.1
Posts: 128

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
If you are really interested in Apollo Guidance Computers and their software check out:
http://agcreplica.outel.org/
 
Old 04-04-2014, 11:41 AM   #8
John VV
Guru
 
Registered: Aug 2005
Posts: 12,956

Rep: Reputation: 1722Reputation: 1722Reputation: 1722Reputation: 1722Reputation: 1722Reputation: 1722Reputation: 1722Reputation: 1722Reputation: 1722Reputation: 1722Reputation: 1722
the LEM's landing computer had " rope" program storage

and almost all of the old Apollo era NASA code is for a CRAY mainframe
and most of the shuttle code is also for a then OLD and almost ancient cray mainframe that the cape was still using .

one that kept CRASHING during a shuttle launch

now there is a ton of new and newish code .
i use a few NASA/JPL and JPL/USGS programs

there are also many many tons of ancient f77 code

and a lot of code wrote for RH3 to rh9 ( pre RHEL days )
 
Old 04-04-2014, 12:58 PM   #9
jlinkels
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2003
Location: Bonaire
Distribution: Debian Lenny/Squeeze/Wheezy/Sid
Posts: 4,105

Rep: Reputation: 495Reputation: 495Reputation: 495Reputation: 495Reputation: 495
Quote:
Originally Posted by sundialsvcs View Post
There basically wasn't any software on those systems that (supposedly ...) went to the moon. Ostensibly, they did it with slide rules.
Oh yes, there was. Aldrin even carried the complete hex dump for the program on rice paper (for the weight) in case he had to re-enter the code into that computer. If you google you'll find accurate descriptions for those computers, including details like memory capacity and word size.

jlinkels
 
Old 04-04-2014, 01:08 PM   #10
sundialsvcs
Guru
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: SE Tennessee, USA
Distribution: Gentoo, LFS
Posts: 5,382

Rep: Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109
Ahh, yes. The rice paper story. There would have been no time to re-enter that program with switches during the very critical time any such thing would have been needed.

I think that the movie, Capricorn One, says all that there needs to be said about the Apollo project, and about how easily it could be accepted by a population that had never seen special effects before. A much-beloved and recently-assassinated President had made a promise that technologically couldn't (and, still can't) be kept, but NASA was determined to make the wish come true anyway. (And, yeah, I was there then. I watched it too.) It was a time when people wanted to believe that technology, and the US Government, could do anything, and that if you saw it on television it must be true. But even today sattelites get burned to a crisp by solar radiation and by the concentrated power of the belts which deflect that fury away from us. (All of the "space walks" that we do are inside some of those belts, as are the majority of satellites, which are "not geosynchronous" for a good reason.) Two men in a capsule with the shielding of a telephone booth, or standing on the surface of an entirely unshielded planetoid, would have been similarly fried. But we just didn't know to think about such things, then. And who knows, maybe it was a good thing to seem to make JFK's wish come true.

Last edited by sundialsvcs; 04-04-2014 at 01:11 PM.
 
Old 04-04-2014, 02:09 PM   #11
michaelk
Moderator
 
Registered: Aug 2002
Posts: 11,925

Rep: Reputation: 747Reputation: 747Reputation: 747Reputation: 747Reputation: 747Reputation: 747Reputation: 747
Quote:
Originally Posted by John VV View Post
the LEM's landing computer had " rope" program storage

and almost all of the old Apollo era NASA code is for a CRAY mainframe
and most of the shuttle code is also for a then OLD and almost ancient cray mainframe that the cape was still using .

one that kept CRASHING during a shuttle launch

now there is a ton of new and newish code .
i use a few NASA/JPL and JPL/USGS programs
The shuttle's used an IBM AP101 avionics computer which are based upon the 360s. I'm not sure what NASA used to compile the code.
 
Old 04-04-2014, 02:34 PM   #12
xyzone
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Posts: 10

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by sundialsvcs View Post
Ahh, yes. The rice paper story. There would have been no time to re-enter that program with switches during the very critical time any such thing would have been needed.

I think that the movie, Capricorn One, says all that there needs to be said about the Apollo project, and about how easily it could be accepted by a population that had never seen special effects before. A much-beloved and recently-assassinated President had made a promise that technologically couldn't (and, still can't) be kept, but NASA was determined to make the wish come true anyway. (And, yeah, I was there then. I watched it too.) It was a time when people wanted to believe that technology, and the US Government, could do anything, and that if you saw it on television it must be true. But even today sattelites get burned to a crisp by solar radiation and by the concentrated power of the belts which deflect that fury away from us. (All of the "space walks" that we do are inside some of those belts, as are the majority of satellites, which are "not geosynchronous" for a good reason.) Two men in a capsule with the shielding of a telephone booth, or standing on the surface of an entirely unshielded planetoid, would have been similarly fried. But we just didn't know to think about such things, then. And who knows, maybe it was a good thing to seem to make JFK's wish come true.
lol
 
Old 04-04-2014, 03:39 PM   #13
jlinkels
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2003
Location: Bonaire
Distribution: Debian Lenny/Squeeze/Wheezy/Sid
Posts: 4,105

Rep: Reputation: 495Reputation: 495Reputation: 495Reputation: 495Reputation: 495
Quote:
Originally Posted by sundialsvcs View Post
Ahh, yes. The rice paper story. There would have been no time to re-enter that program with switches during the very critical time any such thing would have been needed.

I think that the movie, Capricorn One, says all that there needs to be said about the Apollo project, and about how easily it could be accepted by a population that had never seen special effects before. A much-beloved and recently-assassinated President had made a promise that technologically couldn't (and, still can't) be kept, but NASA was determined to make the wish come true anyway. (And, yeah, I was there then.
<snip>
maybe it was a good thing to seem to make JFK's wish come true.
Well it was a nice era anyway. The Cold War wasn't nice, but you knew who was good and who was bad. No terrorism yet, and the muslims stayed home.

What keeps on amazing me is the unbelievable amount of research, development and production has been achieved in those years between 1961 and 1969. All those projects which were outsourced by NASA, all the specifications, procurement, testing, acceptance, trainings, whatnot and that in only 8 years time. And this was not simple product development, this was highly unknown territory. In 1961 or 1962 they only decided on the rendez-vouz model and knew they would need a capsule, an LM and a 3-men crew. So from that point on development started. In that time it took 7 years to develop a new car, and that was by a single company. Incredible to manage a project like this and have everyting fit in time and space. (Pun intended)

And I often quote JFK if someone complains something is too difficult: "We are not doing this because it is easy, we are doing this because it is hard. Because we want to demonstrate we can do better than others"

jlinkels

Last edited by jlinkels; 04-04-2014 at 03:43 PM.
 
Old 04-07-2014, 11:43 AM   #14
sundialsvcs
Guru
 
Registered: Feb 2004
Location: SE Tennessee, USA
Distribution: Gentoo, LFS
Posts: 5,382

Rep: Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109Reputation: 1109
It was, indeed, an ... improbably ... amazing bit of progress, which was never matched by any other engineering team before or since.

Think about it: nothing ever went wrong for the Apollo space program, except for one mission that somehow also had a storybook ending. JFK's promise was fulfilled to the national glory-ment of all. Right on time. All on television. It was too good to be true . . .

But, sometimes a good cover-story is what the public wants, and so it is what you should be careful to give them. No one wants to think about "a right-hand man coup d'etat" occurring in America. No one wants to consider that what a young, energetic President promised the world could not actually be achieved, let alone "by 1969." No one wanted to consider that three (not just two) buildings in downtown New York were successfully demolitioned. No, these are not palatable stories to millions of people. Therefore, these are not the stories that you tell them. And, there is something to be said for that approach.
 
Old 04-07-2014, 11:53 AM   #15
michaelk
Moderator
 
Registered: Aug 2002
Posts: 11,925

Rep: Reputation: 747Reputation: 747Reputation: 747Reputation: 747Reputation: 747Reputation: 747Reputation: 747
Yes, something did go wrong... What About Apollo 1?
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Find me source code for "iwlist" & "iwconfig" Angela Wu Linux - Kernel 2 09-15-2013 08:44 PM
Hey! I wanna set up "Linux Live Help Desk" for Newbies,etc linus72 Linux - Newbie 4 05-22-2009 07:57 AM
Can someone give me the definition of "Kernel Symbol" and "EXPORT_SYMBOL" ?? Raynus Programming 2 08-30-2008 07:19 PM
Standard commands give "-bash: open: command not found" even in "su -" and "su root" mibo12 Linux - General 4 11-11-2007 10:18 PM
the "nasa mountain" :D ungua General 1 11-04-2005 01:15 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:36 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration