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Old 03-26-2004, 06:30 PM   #1
ptesone
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Three kinds of Linux users: an observation


First of don't be offended! This is not my intention! -I had originally posted this on justlinux and got some interesting feedback.
(But it was two kinds of Linux users, here I've decided to expand it to three)- Remember, it's just an observation and my opinion. . !


Three kinds of Linux users:

1. Windows users turned Linux:
-These are users who are used to doing things via GUI, by graphical user interface.
-these are users who, for the most part, first learned how to use a computer using microsoft windows.
-they are more comfortable using GUI interfaces as opposed to DOS command prompts. This means if they want to change a monitor resolution for instance, they're used to right clicking on the desktop, going to properties, etc. . .
-some of them don't even know what a command prompt is.
-I would say the majority of NEW Linux users today are coming from this group. . .(my opinion of course)


2. Old school Users turned Linux:
-this would include people who started on VIC20's Commedore 64,s, Tandys, XT's & AT's, 8086-88, etc. . .
-These are users who have kinda been around since before there where windows and therefore kinda have an understanding of CLI (command line interface) and DOS prompts, and even Basic Programming (this is where I come from, btw).
-They aren't afraid to dive headfirst into something that could be considered difficult to pick up and may not get it right the first time.
-These users may have been 'stuck' with an older machine (not by choice) and have had to survive with what they get their hands on and what they could get working.


3. Programers:
-This could be anyone associated with programming be it C++, perl, etc. . .
-They are more comfortable using things like VI or VIM and prefer the CLI over the GUI
-They are used to compiling, writing code and know what the heck a, -put your term here- is/does. . .
-Are sometimes more or less tolerant of the 'windows' users


My point is:
I feel that Linux could be a better, more stable, more configurable, more customizable OS than something like Windows (which it already is), especially if there we're more programers out there to support and write programs for it. . .
Now I'm not saying they should try to make Linux more like windows, on the contrary. There should be more programs written for Linux that could compete with windows programs. . .
I realize the whole Open Source Community is just that- to provide us with good, free and support for Linux. . .I also realize that money,or lack thereof has someting to do with it as well. . .
What windows DOES provide however is a very robust, easy to use, straightforward approach with 'higher end' programs and games (including blue screens, too).


In my opinion:
If Linux had the programmers that Windows had, it would be and could be far better in performance, stability and more secure. . .
(Did you know things like Philips TV recording units are already running linux?)
my question is, where are all the cool programers ?
 
Old 03-26-2004, 06:38 PM   #2
ryeman
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Re: Three kinds of Linux users: an observation

Quote:
Originally posted by ptesone


In my opinion:
If Linux had the programmers that Windows had, it would be and could be far better in performance, stability and more secure. . .
(Did you know things like Philips TV recording units are already running linux?)
my question is, where are all the cool programers ?
Don't forget that IBM is a strong supporter of Linux (and Novell purchased SuSE) That is just the start! BTW.. there are even some cell phones that use Linux as a OS..
 
Old 03-26-2004, 06:39 PM   #3
Bruce Hill
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They're here. My question is, why can't the developers write documentation that is both correct, and not esoteric?
 
Old 03-26-2004, 06:50 PM   #4
Baldorg
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Funny, i'm in neither of these groups.
 
Old 03-26-2004, 07:19 PM   #5
vi0lat0r
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I suppose I would fit into the programming group, although I do more website programming...

It wouldn't make alot of difference to me using commands instead of GUI... but then again there -IS- KDE and it does look/run good... plus I can still have my terminal ;-) ... so I figure why not use both?
 
Old 03-26-2004, 07:27 PM   #6
ptesone
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I guess it depends on the users needs then.
If you're just using internet, checking email, writing up documents, creating multimedia, then either Linux or Windows is good for that. . .If you want to learn something new or have a challenge, or have something that is completely customizable or uses your computer hardware in a different manner than windows, then I think you should be trying out Linux. . .The disto- is up to you. . .

My Computer history:
My first computer was a commodore VIC20 (couldn't afford the 64) and I started writing basic programs on that on the school's AppleII E's. The only way to save my data was on a tape deck!
Then came the IBM AT's XT's and Qbasic, man that was a long time ago. . .I remember my first experience using a mouse and remember thinking, why?
Then came the K-pros and other 8086 machines running Kings Quest and the like. . .
My first brush with Linux was back in the late 90's with Red Hat 5, and then Mandrake, I forget what version. . But I was used to 'windows' thinking: how do I access the hardrive? Where is the floppy? Where are all the cool programs and how do I run them? Where does the desktop exist? Etc. . .
I couldn't believe that you could play Descent in Linux, I thought that was the coolest. . .
I have installed Debian from scratch, it was woody I believe, but prefer using something like knoppix to put on my HD. . .It's just quicker and easier for me. . .I really like the look of SuSE, but if you're gonna use KDE windows what's the point, they're all pretty much the same. . .
 
Old 03-26-2004, 07:27 PM   #7
SciYro
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i think I'm stuck in #2, as one of the first computers i used was a commodore 64 (or was it the old hondya (i think its spelled Wong, but all it was good for was chess, and ASCII art ), .. i think thats kinda sad as I'm stuck in the "Old school Users turned Linux" spot when I'm only 16 (yea, i guess i do feel very old, but most people don't think 16 is that old), but anyway, thats were i got into programing, and thus loved linux when i first got used to it, (THE COMMAND LINE!!, the long lost command line!, ah, how i missed it)

i tried programing in windows, not very fun, theres like 100 different compilers, its just soo confusing, (except assembly programing, that was the only fun stuff to do in windows),, in linux its almost as easy as it was in the commodore 64, just type the program, (then pass it to gcc, and your set)

and why must number 2 have almost everything in common with what i do!! (I'm not that old!) (but i guess it doesn't help that i have a Pentium laptop (old by computers standards these days, and that the first distro i tried and eventually got stuck with was supposed to be for experienced linux users (just goes to show even newbies can use "hard" linux software and get along just fine)

now back to trying to find any way out of that "old" group, cause i don't got gray hair (yet), and I'm not all wrinkly! (i hope)
 
Old 03-26-2004, 07:29 PM   #8
Kovacs
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I think all the open source programmers are "cool", much more so than any of their corporate wage slave counterparts.

You're putting an arbitrary value on a certain type of (GUI) app, over CLI apps. Different strokes for different folks. The other thing is that a lot of the super-apps in windows (take dreamweaver for example) are an enormous amount of work that requires dozens if not hundreds of full time developers - although open source is catching up (eg with quanta), there just aren't the resources to match them. Open source developers have to eat and pay the rent too.
 
Old 03-26-2004, 07:29 PM   #9
Joey.Dale
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I am:
I first learned how to use a computer using microsoft windows.

I am not afraid to dive headfirst into something that could be considered difficult to pick up and may not get it right the first time.

I have been 'stuck' with an older machine (not by choice) and have had to survive with what they get their hands on and what they could get working.

I am associated with programming be it C++, perl, etc. . .

-They are more comfortable using things like VI or VIM and prefer the CLI over the GUI

Just my

-Joey
 
Old 03-26-2004, 08:37 PM   #10
mikshaw
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I've come from the first group...using Windows for several years with no prior computer experience. Since using Linux, however, I've begun to learn how much more useful and powerful the commandline and scripting can be, and now see a GUI as a nice optional addition on top of a great system rather than a inseparable necessity.
 
Old 03-26-2004, 08:42 PM   #11
dizzy_vee
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I started with a VIC 20 as well, programming in BASIC, then the Commodore 64 (man, they had some great games, didn't they?? So little technology, but they were soooo fun!! The new Defender of the Crown is nothing compared to the old one). Anyway, then started using the BBS and internet (this was pre browser). Moved on to a 386, and up and up and up. Anyway, I use Windows for games/music production, Linux for everything else and Mac at work.

Guess I fit in number 2. As a side note, Linux users have often been accused of elitism, and I have to admit, I know alot of Linux users like that (less now that I am older). Anyway, from what I can see on this board, there is refreshingly little of that elitism coming through, which is great. Mac users, however, drive me nuts at work and the ones I deal with. They still have a case of elite-itis. I love all 3 platforms for what they can do for me. They all have their strengths and weaknesses, and if you can learn them all, why the heck not?

Cheers,
Dizzy V
 
Old 03-26-2004, 08:51 PM   #12
twilli227
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I thought there were only two kinds of linux users
 
Old 03-26-2004, 09:39 PM   #13
e1000
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Re: Three kinds of Linux users: an observation

Quote:
Originally posted by ptesone
therefore kinda have an understanding of CLI (command line interface) and DOS prompts, and even Basic Programming (this is where I come from, btw).
-They aren't afraid to dive headfirst into something that could be considered difficult to pick up and may not get it right the first time.
-These users may have been 'stuck' with an older machine (not by choice) and have had to survive with what they get their hands on and what they could get working.
this post seems to eager to clasify people, I came from windows, but i am by no means a GUI kiddie, and im just as comfortable in the CLI as i am in Xwindows (even when im in X, im using a terminal more than half the time anyways). Iv found that 99% of problems have a solution thats CLI based (the other 1% cant be solved). I compile my own kernel, run a cluster with my newly built machine & my old one. and I am a avid slackware user.

the only real reason to use X for me is games, mozilla, and XMMS. prety good for a 'windows convert'.

im just saying that you shouldnt judge a book by its cover.
 
Old 03-26-2004, 11:04 PM   #14
SciYro
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i think what he means is
1) GUI only people
2) people that work with and use the command line (not use GUI based stuff to do everything that a CLI can do)
3) wtf is this?, umm ill say both, but programing usually uses the CLI (at least it used to), so for simplicity ill just keep it form 1-2 and leave 3 out (as its kinda like a combo, nothing more then people who are either 1 or 2 that know how to make computer softwareish thingyies

Last edited by SciYro; 03-26-2004 at 11:05 PM.
 
Old 03-26-2004, 11:30 PM   #15
JaseP
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I don't agree with the classification.

I like a good GUI as much as the next guy...
But I first started using experimental one-board computers in the 1970s and then Unix based maninframes.
I then started using various other computers, but still always liked the graphical user interface. It just looked nicer and made a lot of things easier. I will create ways to do things with a mouse click even if it means writing a simple script... than can be launched as an icon.

It think Linux users defy stratification. There are all kinds; IT professionals, developers, hobbyists, people who are anti-establishment, those just fed up with M$, those who like to be able to customize, those who just want to be different, those who see it as the future and want to be ahead of the curve, etc., etc., etc.
 
  


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