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SlowCoder 03-09-2009 02:55 PM

Spicy Food
 
We have a restaurant that will sell a very spicy slice of pizza as a contest. If you eat all of it you get a shirt and free food. Many people have thrown up during/after eating it, and I've heard it tastes like it should be "coming out the other end". The proprietors won't divulge the ingredients.

Just for fun, I'm considering trying it out. Maybe at least give my son and friends a laugh in the mean time. :)

But I would like to know what might be available to curb the spicy taste before I eat the pizza? I was thinking maybe a tablespoon of olive oil to coat my mouth and throat.

What do you think?

repo 03-09-2009 02:59 PM

Do it the Homer way => candle grease

SlowCoder 03-09-2009 03:21 PM

Yeah, I read about that ... but we're talking about a cartoon here ... who knows what would happen if someone did that in real life?

XavierP 03-09-2009 03:37 PM

Milk is the way to go. In the UK we're big vindaloo fans, and (to quote Lister from Red Dwarf), what's the only thing that can kill a vindaloo? A lager!

brianL 03-09-2009 05:48 PM

Condolences in advance to your family.

esteeven 03-09-2009 05:54 PM

I tend to agree with XavierP's lager suggestion thought I would be cautious and drink at least 6 pints before touching the food.

I do not condone binge drinking.

cloud9repo 03-09-2009 07:10 PM

Kaopektate is good. It's alkaloid nature prevents the acid binding effect of the spice. Has to be done about 15 minutes before consumption.

SlowCoder 03-10-2009 08:43 AM

It's not what it does to my stomach that I'm worried about. It's the burn as it goes down. Need to coat my mouth with something.

Further research says that peppers have a chemical that excites the nerves. It's not an acid that does it. And fatty drinks react to the chemical, breaking it down.

If I *ever* do it (I haven't quite worked myself up to it), I'll let you guys know how it works out! :)

brianL 03-10-2009 08:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SlowCoder (Post 3470697)
If I *ever* do it (I haven't quite worked myself up to it), I'll let you guys know how it works out! :)

Yes, please send us a message from your hospital bed. Or, if the worst comes to the worst, we can hold a seance. :D
P.S.
We will miss you. :cry:

PTrenholme 03-10-2009 10:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SlowCoder (Post 3470697)
It's not what it does to my stomach that I'm worried about. It's the burn as it goes down. Need to coat my mouth with something.

Sugar is fairly effective for this, but, unfortunately, only briefly.
Quote:

Further research says that peppers have a chemical that excites the nerves. It's not an acid that does it.
Quite true, and also the chemical is not at all harmful, so the nerve excitement is only that, doing you no harm.
Quote:

And fatty drinks react to the chemical, breaking it down.
I doubt this. Consider typical Indian food - spices simmered in ghee (clarified butterfat). If fat broke down the chemical, would Indian food still taste spicy?
Quote:

If I *ever* do it (I haven't quite worked myself up to it), I'll let you guys know how it works out! :)
Yes, do. Good luck. (And American soft drinks are loaded with sugar.)

Oh, one other thing: Caspian does not stimulate the nerves in the gut, only the those in the skin, so you only feel the burn as it goes in and comes out. The "vomiting" you report is probably either from actually harmful substances in the food or a psychological reaction.

Su-Shee 03-10-2009 10:55 AM

Fat doesn't break down the capsaicinoids - they are as many chemical compounds of spices and herbs are - just very good soluble in oily/fatty substances.

Because of that you slightly fry peppers and chilis and all other spicy stuff to unleash the perfect hotness (can I say "heat" here?!). The same princible applies to adding fresh salvia into butter or olive oil for pasta sauces. Or for vanilla in butter for cakes and cookies.

The best way to deal with food too hot is to chew on something dry like rice or bread for example. And don't breathe it in. ;)

Or just train in advance - the ability to eat really spicy food can be trained.

H_TeXMeX_H 03-10-2009 02:57 PM

If you don't know what they put in there, I don't recommend you try it. I read the contents of everything before I eat it, because you really are what you eat.

tredegar 03-10-2009 03:22 PM

Quote:

Or just train in advance - the ability to eat really spicy food can be trained.
Very true. I really like those tiny little Thai chilis (พริกขี้หนู)* literal translation "Mouse sh?t chili", according to here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thai_pepper

They are very hot, but the more I eat them, the more I want MORE of them. I used to tolerate the heat for the aroma and flavour, but now I just like them too much and don't care about the heat. I used to put three in a curry-for-two, now it's twelve, and soon it'll be twenty, but the acidity of fresh lime juice is essential to balance the flavour and heat.

So, SlowCoder, maybe take some fresh limes to squeeze onto your hot pizza. I am salivating at the thought. Go for it!

*[No, I cannot read Thai either, but I love the way linux handles strange fonts perfectly]

jay73 03-10-2009 08:17 PM

Miracle berry (Synsepalum dulcificum). Efficient but rather expensive (could cost $2.5 a piece).

manwithaplan 03-10-2009 09:09 PM

How about staying away from pizza as much as you can... stuff makes me gag... :tisk:


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